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Full text of "Undergraduate catalog"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/undergr241925west 



West Virginia University 



FIFTY-EIGHTH YEAR 

CATALOGUE AND 
ANNOUNCEMENTS 



1924 



1925 




MORGANTOWN, WEST VIRGINIA 

PUBLISHED BY THE UNIVERSITY 



CONTENTS 



Calendar 3 

Board of Control and Board of Education 4 

Officers of Administration and Instruction 5 

Description of the Institution 25 

University fees and expenses - 31 

Admission to the University 3:2 

Degrees 39 

General Information 41 

Scope of Entrance Requirements 50 

Accredited Preparatory Schools 56 

Graduate Courses and Degrees 61 

College of Arts and Sciences 97 

College of Engineering and Mechanic Arts 177 

College of Agriculture 229 

College of Law _ 275 

School of Medicine 295 

Courses in Medicine 295 

Courses in Pharmacy .'.... 309 

School of Music 325 

Summer School 343 

Division of Military Science and Tactics 355 

Degrees Conferred in 1924 361 

Address List of Faculty and Staff 373 

List of Students 387 

Summary of Enrollment 439 

Index 440 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 



1925 

June 15, Monday _ Summer School begins 

July 4, Saturday A holiday 

July 24, Friday First half of Summer School closes 

August 29, Saturday Second half of Summer School closes 

September 21, Monday Opening of first semester 

September 21, 22, 23 Registration of Students 

September 24, Thursday First recitations of first semester 

November 20, Friday Day for mid-semester reports 

November 26-29, Thursday to Sunday, inclusive 

Thanksgiving Recess 

December 19, Saturday to January 4, 1926, Monday, inclusive 

Christmas Recess 

1926 

January 30, Saturday Last recitation of first semester 

January 30, Saturday to February 6, Saturday, inclusive 

Final examinations of first semester 

February 9, Tuesday Opening of second semester 

February 9, 10, Tuesday and Wednesday Registration of students 

February 11, Thursday First recitations of second semester 

April 3-5, Saturday to Monday, inclusive Easter Recess 

April 9, Saturday , Day for mid-semester reports 

June 8, Tuesday Last recitations of second semester 

June 9, Wednesday to June 17, Thursday, inclusive 

Final examinations of second semester 

June 13, Sunday Baccalaureate sermon 

June 15, Tuesday Commencement exercise* 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 

Morgantown 



Established February 7, 1867. 



THE STATE BOARD OF CONTROL. 

TERM EXPIRES 

JAMES S. LAKIN, President, Charleston June 30, 1927 

J. WALTER BARNES, Treasurer, Charleston— June 30, 1926 

CLARENCE J. JACKSON, Charleston June 30, 1929 

The State Board of Control has the direction of the financial and 
business affairs of the state educational institutions. 



THE STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION. 

term expires 
GEORGE M. FORD, State Superintendent of Schools, 

President, Charleston-- March 4, 1929 

L. W. BURNS, Martinsburg June 30, 1925 

MRS. LENNA LOWE YOST, Charleston June 30, 1927 

BERNARD McCLAUGHERTY, Blue fie Id June 30, 1928 

EARL W. OGLEBAY, Wheeling June 30, 1929 

W. C. COOK, Welch June 30, 1930 

The State Board of Education has charge of all matters of a 
purely scholastic nature concerning the state educational institutions. 



NOTICE. 

West Virginia University publishes a catalogue of over 400 
paj,'es as well as smaller bulletins descriptive of each of the various 
colleges and schools. Requests for copies of these publications and 
inquiries for information about the University and its work should 
be addressed to 

The President's Office, 

West Virginia University, 
Morgantown, West Va. 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS. 

FRANK BUTLER TROTTER, A.M., LL.D., President of the Uni- 
versity 

ROBERT ALLEN ARMSTRONG, A.M., Litt.D., University Chap- 
lain 

ALFRED JARRETT HARE, A.M., Secretary of the Faculty and 
University Registrar 

HARRY EVERETT STONE, A.M., Dean of Men 

MARTHA THEODA FULTON, A.M., Dean of Women 

JAMES MORTON CALLAHAN, Ph.D., Dean of the College of 

■ Arts and Sciences 

CLEMENT ROSS JONES, M.M.E., Dean of the College of En- 
gineering 

CHARLES ELMER LAWALL, M.S., Director of Mining Extension 

GEORGE RICHARD LYMAN, Ph.D., Dean of the College of Ag- 
riculture 

HENRY GRANGER KNIGHT, Ph.D., Director of the Agricultur- 
al Experiment Station 

NAT TERRY FRAME, A.B., Director of Agricultural Extension 

JOSEPH WARREN MADDEN, A.B., J.D., Dean of the College of 
Law 

JOHN NATHAN SIMPSON, M.D., Dean of the School of Med- 
icine 

LOUIS BLACK, Director of the School of Music 

LLOYD LOWNDES FRIEND, A.M., Director of the Summer 
School and University Examiner 

THE COUNCIL OF ADMINISTRATION. 

The President of the University and the Deans of the various 
colleges. 

THE UNIVERSITY FACULTY. 

The President, Deans of the various colleges, Professors, Asso- 
ciate Professors and Assistant Professors in all divisions of the Uni- 
versity, the Dean of Men, the Dean of Women, the Commandant of 
Cadets, the Director of the School of Music and the Librarian of the 
University. 



8 West Virginia University 

SAMUEL MORRIS, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry 

FRED A. MOLBY, Ph.D., Professor of Physics 

EDWARD SILVER MACLIN, B.S.Edu., Professor of Industrial 
Education 

JOSEPH WARREN MADDEN, B.A., J.D., Professor of Law 

EDMUND CHARLES DICKINSON, A.B., J.D., Professor of Law 

EDWARD JERALD VAN LIERE, M.S., M.D., Professor of Physic 

ology 
MAXWELL JAY DORSEY, Ph.D., Professor of Horticulture 
IRVIN HARDY, M.D., Clinical Professor of Medicine 
CLIFFORD RAYMOND SNIDER, A.B., S.J.D., Professor of Law 
LOUIS AUGUST RUFENER, Ph.D., Professor of Economics 
WILSON PORTER SHORTRIDGE, Ph.D., Professor of History 
FLOYD EARLE CHIDESTER, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology 
GORDON ALGER BERGY, Ph.C, B.S, Professor of Pharmacy 
JOHN LITTLEFIELD TILTON, Ph.D., Professor of Geology 
RALPH JOHN GARBER, Ph.D., Professor of Agronomy 
THOMAS LUTHER HARRIS, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology 
JOHN E. WINTER, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology 

ARTHUR ADAMS HALL, B.S.M.E., Professor of Electrical Engi- 
neering 
PERRY DANIEL STRAUSBAUGH, Ph.D., Professor of Botany 

LELAND S. DEVORE, Major, United States Army, Professor of 
Military Science and Tactics 

HOLLY ESTIL CUNNINGHAM, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy 

WILLIAM ADAMS SMITH, M.D., Professor of Bacteriology and 
Pathology 

ANDREW JACKSON DADISMAN, Ph.D., Professor of Farm 

Economics 
GEORGE RUSSELL BANCROFT, Ph.D., Professor of Physiological 

Chemistry 

ALLEN WILSON PORTERFIELD, Ph.D., Professor of German 

ROBERT CAMERON COLWELL, Ph.D., Professor of Physics 

LONNA DENNIS ARNETT, Ph.D., Librarian and Instructor in 
Library Science 



The College of Arts and Sciences 9 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS. 

EDGAR LEWIS ANDREWS, M.S., Associate Professor of Poultry 
Husbandry 

HUBERT HILL, M.S., Associate Professor of Chemistry 

GIDEON STANHOPE DODDS, Ph.D., Associate Professor of His- 
tology and Embryology 

HARRY EDWARD KNOWLTON, Ph.D., Associate Professor of 
Horticulture 

HARLEY LUCIUS CRANE, M.S.Agr., Associate Professor of Hor- 
ticulture 

EARL CLAUDIUS HAMILTON DAVIES, Ph.D., Associate Profes- 
sor of Chemistry 

EUGENE PEYTON DEATRICK, Ph.D., Associate Professor of 
Soils 

PERLEY ISAAC REED, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English 

ENOCH FRANKLIN GEORGE, Ph.D., Associate Professor of 
Physics 

CLAUDE CARL SPIKER, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Romance 
Languages 

ROBERT CLIFTON SPANGLER, A.M., Associate Professor of 
Botany 

IRA WELLBORN SMITHEY, Ph.D.,2 Associate Professor of Chem- 
istry 

ROBB SPALDING SPRAY, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Pathology 
and Bacteriology 

EARL READ SCHEFFEL, M.S., Associate Professor of Geology 

HARRY ORAM HENDERSON, M.S., 3 Associate Professor of Dairy 
Husbandry 

HOWARD BUSHNELL ALLEN, M.S., Associate Professor of Agri- 
cultural Education 

THEODORE EUGENE ODLAND, M.S., Associate Professor of 
Agronomy 

HARRY CHRISTOPHER HUMPHREYS, Ph.D., Associate Profes- 
sor of Education 



2(3n leave of ab&ence, 1924-25. 

SOn leave of absence 1924-25, studying at University of Minnesota. 

4 



10 West Virginia University 

CHARLES ELMER LAWALL, E.M., M.S., Associate Professor of 
Mining Engineering and Director of Mining Extension 

LAKIN FISKE ROBERTS, A.M., Associate Professor of Education 

JOHN FRANK PEARCY, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physiology 

ELIZABETH MATTINGLY STALNAKER, Ph.D., Associate Pro- 
fessor of Education 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

BENJAMIN WALTER KING, A.M., Assistant Professor of Eco- 
nomics 

GEORGE WALTER GROW, B.S.M.E., M.S., Assistant Professor of 
Drawing and Machine Design 

HARVEY CARSON GRUMBINE Ph.D.," Assistant Professor of 

English 
REBECCA LUELLA POLLOCK, A.M., 4 Assistant Professor of 

Education 
LILY BELL SEFTON DEATRICK, Ph.D., 5 Assistant Professor of 

Chemistry 

KYLE CHESTER WESTOVER, M.S.Agr., 6 Assistant Professor of 
Drawing and Machine Design 

BENNETT SEXTON WHITE, B.S.M.E., Assistant Professor of 
Drawing and Machine Design 

CLARENCE NEWTON REYNOLDS, Jr., Ph.D., Assistant Professor 
of Mathematics 

EDMUND DANIEL McGARRY, A.B., M.B.A., Assistant Professor 
of Pharmacy 

JAMES LESTER HAYMAN, B.S., Ph.C, Assistant Professor of 
Pharmacy 

MARGARET BUCHANAN, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathe- 
matics 

JOHN RICHARDSON MILLER, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 
Romance Languages 

ARTHUR R. WHITNER, Captain, U. S. Infantry, (D. 0. L.) 
Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics 

LEON H. LEONIAN, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Plant Pathology 



40n leave of absence, 1924-25, studying at University of Iowa. 
5 On leave of absence, 1924-5. 

60n leave of absence, 1924-5, studying at Cornell University. 
lOResigned, April 1, 1925. 



The College of Arts and Sciences H 

CHARLES MITRANI, A.M., 7 Assistant Professor of Romance Lan- 
guages 

BIRD MARGARET TURNER, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathe- 
matics 

ROY A. OLNEY, B.S., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Education 

HUGH C. GILCHRIST, Captain Infantry, U. S. Army, Assistant 
Professor of Military Science and Tactics 

THOMAS F. KERN, First Lieutenant, U. S. Army, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Military Science and Tactics 

ADAM CRAWFORD, Assistant Director of Mining Extension 

CARL HENRY CATHER, M.S., Assistant Professor of Mechanics 

WERNER CASPER MICHEL, D.P.S., Assistant Professor of Ger- 

■ man 

JACOB SAPOSNEKOW, A.M., Assistant Professor of Sociology 

ROBERT BARCLAY DUSTMAN, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 
Chemistry 

LESTER COLLINS FARRIS, A.M., Assistant Professor of English 

LELAND HART TAYLOR, S.D., Assistant Professor of Zoology 

HARRY CURTIS MITCHELL, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History 

CHARLES VINYARD WILSON, M.S., Assistant Professor of Animal 
Husbandry 

ERWIN COVERDALE STILLWELL, M.S., Assistant Professor of 
Animal Husbandry 

NELL NESBIT, A.M., Assistant Professor of Home Economics 

JEAN ELNORA RICHMOND, A.M., Assistant Professor of Home 
Economics 

WALTER ALLOS KOEHLER, Ch.E., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 
Chemical Engineering 

THOMAS FRASER, E.M., Assistant Professor of Mining Engineer- 
ing 

HOWARD J. GORMAN, 11 Captain, Infantry U. S. Army, Assistant 
Professor of Miliary Science and Tactics 

FRANK B. HASTIE, First Lieutenant, Engineer Corps U. S. 
Army, Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics 



TOn leave of absence, 1924-25, studying at Harvard University. 
liDied, April, 1925. 



12 West Virginia University 

INSTRUCTORS. 

SUSAN MAXWELL MOORE, A.B., Instructor in Piano 

GRACE MARTIN SNEE, B.M., Instructor in Piano and Pipe Organ 

RUFUS ASA WEST, Instructor in Metalworking 

FLORA RAY HAYES, A.B., Instructor in Theory and History of 

Music 

RAYMER EGBERT SEAMAN, Instructor in Woodworking and 
Foundry Practice 

CLARA LYTLE, A.M., Instructor in English 

ELIZABETH FROST REED, A.M., Instructor in English 

MARJA STEADMAN FEAR, A.B., Instructor in Public Speaking 

HAROLD MALCOLM CATHER, B.S.M.E., Instructor in Drawing 
and Machine Design 

WILLIAM JOHN CARL, Instructor in Foundry Practice 

ERNEST ANGELO, B.S.Agr., Instructor in Horticulture 

CHARLES McCHESNEY BRAY, M.D., Instructor in Physical 
Diagnosis 

CHARLES ROYAL KESSEL, M.D., Instructor in Physical Diagnosis 

NELLIE PERRELL AMMONS, A.B., Instructor in Botany 

WILLIAM OLIVER GNAGEY, Instructor in Machine Shop Practice 

ALICE MILNER TAYLOR, B.S.H.E., Instructor in Home Economics 

ROY EZEKIEL NELSON, B.S.C.E., Instructor in Surveying 

FERRIS DEWEY CORNELL, Jr., M.S., Instructor in Farm 
Mechanics 

KARL SPANGLER QUISENBERRY, B.S.Agr., 8 Instructor in 
Agronomy 

ELMER LIONEL HAMMOND, Ph.C, B.S.Pharm., Instructor in 
Pharmacy 

LYDIA IRENE HINKEL, B.Mus., Instructor in Public School Music 

GREEK SAYRE, A.M., Instructor in English 

MARGARET ELIZABETH BUTMAN, Instructor in Piano 

HELEN PURINTON PETTIGREW, A.M., Instructor in English 



80n leave of absence, 1924-25, studying at University of Minnesota. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 13 

ETHEL BORDEN BLACK, Instructor in Piano 

LOUIS WATSON CHAPPELL, M.A., Instructor in English 

ALFRED BEVERLY SCOTT, Instructor in Drawing 

ISABELLE LOWE COCHRANE, B.S., Instructor in Home Eco- 
nomics 

JOSEPH HUNTER HASKELL, Instructor in Mining (Extension) 

JULIAN PAUL MADDEN, Instructor in Mining (Extension) 

EDWARD LEE SHAW, B.S.Agr., Instructor in Animal Husbandry 

WILLIAM ORR SWAN, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry 

ROBERT GRAHAM TURNER, M.S., Instructor in Chemistry 

ROBERT LOUIS MOLITOR, M.A., Instructor in English 

ARCHIBALD MACGREGOR GRIMES, A.M., Instructor in Spanish 

MARTHA THEODA FULTON, A.M., Instructor in English 

GRACE MARGARET GRIFFIN, A.B., Instructor in Physical Edu- 
cation for Women 

LEWIS VAN CARPENTER, B.S.C.E., Instructor in Structural and 
Hydraulic Engineering 

DICKSON WARD PARSONS, M.S., Instructor in Vocational Agri- 
culture 

WALTER W. ARMENTROUT, B.S.Agr., Instructor in Farm Eco- 
nomics 

FRANK DELLI-GATTI, Instructor in Violin and Ensemble 

HARRY NEIGHARD GRUBER, B.S.Agr., Field Instructor, U. S. 
Veterans' Bureau 

JOHN F. CAMPBELL, B.S., Field Instructor, U. S. Veterans' Bureau 
EUGENE WILLIAM BELL, Instructor in Mining (Extension) 
THOMAS JOHN BINNS, Instructor in Mining (Extension) 
RAY HEWITT MAGEE, Instructor in Mining (Extension) 

RAYMOND JONES TITTERINGTON, Instructor in Mining (Ex- 
tension) 

PAUL STUART BUCHANAN, A.B., Instructor in Public Speaking 

SIDNEY LAMONT McGEE, A.B., Instructor in Romance Languages 



90n leave of absence, 1924-25, studying at University of Wisconsin. 



14 West Virginia University 

VIRGIL ROSS HERTZOG, Ph.G., Instructor in Pharmacology 

JOSEPH BANKS RHINE, M.S., Instructor in Botany 

DUNCAN CLAIRE HARKINS, A.M., Instructor in Mathematics 

MYRON IRVING BARKER, A.B., Instructor in Romance Languages 

BETRAM DONALD BARCLAY, B.S., Instructor in Botany 

ARMAND RENE COLLETT, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry 

MORRIS JOSEPH FIELDS, M.B.A., Instructor in Economics 

CLARENCE EUGENE GARLAND, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry 

SARA ELIZABETH SLATER, B.S., Instructor in Home Economics 

WARREN GIFFORD, B.S.Agr., Instructor in Dairy Husbandry 

TROY MANSELL CURRENCE, B.S.Agr., Instructor in Horticulture 

GEORGE MALCOLM TROUT, M.S., Instructor in Dairy Husbandry 

SHERMAN SHAW WHEELER, M.S., Instructor in Animal Hus- 
bandry 

ARLO BOWLBY CARROLL, B.S.Agr., Instructor, U. S. Veterans' 
Bureau 

LEE LEONARD AMIDON, B.S.M.E., Instructor in Steam and Ex- 
perimental Engineering 

TOM COX LLOYD, B.S.E.E., Instructor in Electrical Engineering 

WINFREE LLOYD ARRINGTON, Instructor in Mining Extension 

WALTER S. MOORE, B.S.E.M., Local Instructor in Mining Exten- 
sion 

RAYMOND EVAN BAILEY, B.S., Instructor in Anatomy 

RAYMOND HAILE CURRY, B.S., Instructor in Pathology and 
Bacteriology 

JAMES STANLEY POUNDSTONE, Instructor in Mining Extension 

HERALD GLYNN YOUNG, B.S., Instructor in Physiology 

ANDREAS ELVIKEN, Cand. Mag., Instructor in History 

PAUL AXEL EKE, Ph.D., Instructor in Farm Economics 



The College op Arts and Sciences 15 

ASSISTANTS. 

WALTER ALEXANDER MESTREZAT, Assistant in Music 

HERMAN DELOSS STILLMAN, Assistant in Woodworking 

LUCY BELTZHOOVER DILLE, Assistant in Vocal Music 

HANNIBAL ALBERT DAVIS, A.B., Assistant in Mathematics 

FRANCES HARSHBARGER, A.B., Assistant in Mathematics 

WARREN SCUDDER BOURN, A.B., Assistant in Zoology 

HARRY HILL, A.B., Assistant in Physics 

BRYAN LEWELLYN WADE, B.S.Agr., Assistant in Agronomy 

HARLEY L. DEARBORN, Sergeant, U. S. A., Assistant to the Pro- 
fessor of Military Science and Tactics 

HENRY T. SCHULTZ, Staff Sergeant, U. S. A., Assistant to the 
Professor of Military Science and Tactics 

WILLIAM H. RUSSELL, Sergeant, (D.E.M.L.) U. S. A., Assistant 
to the Professor of Military Science and Tactics 

GEORGE DAVID HOTT, A.M., Assistant in History 

CAREY WOOFTER, A.B., Assistant in English 

LYNN WADDELL, A.B., Assistant in English 

PAUL WALKER EDEBURN, B.S., Assistant in Chemistry 

JOHN WILLIAM FARREN, B.S.Ch.E., Assistant in Chemistry 

ALTON BEE FORTNEY, A.B., Assistant in Chemistry 

HAZEL VANDYKE ROBERTS, A.B., Assistant in Economics 

CLARENCE FREDERIC SCHROEDER, Jr., A.B., Assistant in 
Zoology 

EVERLY CALVERT, Assistant in Machine Shop 

WAYNE ZEARLEY FRIEND, B.S.Ch.E., Student Assistant and 
Fellow in Chemical Engineering 

HAZEL MARY GODDARD, B.S., Assistant in Home Economics 

FRANK WALDO CRAIG, B.S.Agr., Assistant in Entomology 



16 West Virginia University 

ERNEST THOMAS WIGHTMAN, B.S.Agr., Assistant in Poultry 
Husbandry 

LEWIS GLENN STARK, B.S.Agr., Assistant in Horticulture 

JAMES H. WHITE, Second Lieutenant, Reserve Corps, Assistant 
to Professor of Military Science and Tactics 

EUGENE G. SMITH, Second Lieutenant, Engineer Reserve Corps, 
Assistant to the Professor of Military Science and Tactics 



STUDENT ASSISTANTS 
JOHN FRANK BARTLETT, Student Assistant in Chemistry 

WRIGHT MONTGOMERY WELTON, Student Assistant in Chem- 
istry 
LYLE KERMIT HERNDON, Student Assistant in Chemistry 

CONSTANCE JANE SHARPLESS, Student Assistant in Chemistry 

CHARLES WILLARD DRIVER, Student Assistant in Chemistry 

ALBERT B. SCOTT, Jr., Student Assistant in Chemistry 

RAY ELLIOTT BOONE, Student Assistant in Chemistry 

MAHON LUCAS HENDERSON, Student Assistant in Chemistry 

MAURICE COFFYN HOLMES, Student Assistant in Chemistry 

LUCY MALINDA WOLFE, Student Assistant in Chemistry 

DOROTHY WOODBURN, Student Assistant in Chemistry 

HUGO BLUMENBERG, Student Assistant in Economics 

JOHN VIRGIL ROACH, Student Assistant in Economics 

HAROLD FRANCIS PORTERFIELD, Student Assistant in History 

NETTIE SOUTHWORTH HERNDON, Student Assistant in History 

EULAI BROOKS CALLAGHAN, Student Assistant in Chemistry 

THOMAS STEPHEN CRAWFORD, Student Assistant in Mathe- 
matics 

THEODORE COOPER, Student Assistant in Zoology 

RICHARD CONNER HAISLIP, Student Assistant in Zoology 



The College of Arts and Sciences 17 

CHARLES LYNVILLE LEPPERT, Student Assistant in Zoology 

MILTON WOLPERT, Student Assistant in Zoology 

JOHN PIERPONT HELMICK, Student Assistant in Philosophy 

JANE COX, Student Assistant in Psychology 

GEORGE ALVIN STEIN, Student Assistant in Chemical Engineer- 
ing 

KENNETH DEAHL, Student Assistant in Surveying 

HICKMAN CHARLES MURPHY, Student Assistant in Agronomy 

GEORGE OSCAR MULLAN, Student Assistant in Poultry Hus- 
bandry 

JOSIAH WALLACE BAIRD, Jr., Student Assistant in Dairy Hus- 
bandry 

ALLEN McKINLEY ELLIOTT, Student Assistant in Dairy Hus- 
bandry 



18 West Virginia University 

THE WEST VIRGINIA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT 
STATION STAFF 

GEORGE RICHARD LYMAN, Ph.D., Dean of the College of Agri- 
culture 

HENRY GRANGER KNIGHT, Ph.D., Director and Chemist 

WILLIAM EARL RUMSEY, B.S.Agr., State Entomologist 

LEONARD MARION PEAIRS, M.S., Entomologist 

HORACE ATWOOD, M.S.Agr., Poultry Husbandman 

♦NAHUM JAMES GIDDINGS, Ph.D., Plant Pathologist 

"^ERNEST LEE ANTHONY, M.S., Dairy Husbandman 

♦EDWARD ALEXANDER LIVESAY, M.S., M.A., 5 Animal Hus- 
bandman 

♦MAXWELL JAY DORSEY, Ph.D., Horticulturist 

♦RALPH JOHN GARBER, Ph.D., Agronomist 

♦ANDREW JACKSON DADISMAN, Ph.D., Farm Economist 

♦HARRY EDWARD KNOWLTON, Ph.D., Associate Horticulturist 

♦HARLEY LUCIUS CRANE, M.S.Agr., Associate Horticulturist 

♦EUGENE PEYTON DEATRICK, Ph.D., Associate Soil Technol- 
ogist 

♦HARRY ORAM HENDERSON, M.S., 5 Associate Dairy Husband- 
man 

♦THEODORE EUGENE ODLAND, M.S., Associate Agronomist 

CHARLES EDWARD WEAKLEY, Jr., A.B., Assistant Chemist 

ANTHONY BERG, M.S., Assistant Plant Pathologist 

LUTHER FRANCIS SUTTON, B.S.Agr., 3 Assistant Horticulturist 

♦KYLE CHESTER WESTOVER, M.S.Agr., 5 Assistant Horticulturist 

fEVERETT CLIFTON SHERWOOD, M.S., Assistant Plant Pathol- 
ogist 

THEODORE CLINTON McILVAINE, Ph.D., Assistant Agronomist 

THEODORIC BRYANT LEITH, B.A., 1 Assistant Chemist 



The College of Arts and Science ; 19 

Agricultural Experiment Station Staff — (Continued) 

ROSS HOMAN TUCKWILLER, B.S.,- Assistant Animal Husband- 
man 

*LEON H. LEONIAN, Ph.D., Assistant Plant Pathologist 

*ERWIN COVERDALE STILLWELL, M.S., Assistant Animal Hus- 
bandman 

♦CHARLES VINYARD WILSON, M.S., Assista7it Animal Husband- 
man 

fCHARLES ELLSWORTH STOCKDALE, B.S.Agr., Agricultural 
Editor 

♦ERNEST ANGELO, B.S.Agr., Junior Horticulturist 

♦FERRIS DEWEY CORNELL, Jr., M.S., Junior Farm Engineer 

♦KARL SPANGLER QUISENBERRY, B.S.Agr., 5 Junior Agronomist 

THOMAS JOSEPH COCHRANE, B.S., Junior Chemist 

$W ALTER W. ARMENTROUT, B.S.Agr.,- Junior Farm Economist 

♦WARREN GIFFORD, B.S.Agr., Junior Dairy Husbandman 

♦TROY MANSELL CURRENCE, B.S.Agr., Junior Horticulturist 

♦GEORGE MALCOLM TROUT, M.S., Junior Dairy Husbandman 

JOHN CHARLES JOHNSTON, Chief Clerk 



2ln co-operation with the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

lln co-operation with the State Department of Agriculture. 

3ln charge of Reymann Memorial Farms. 

4ln charge of sub-station at Maggie, W. Va. 

sOn leave of absence, 1924-25. 

♦Member of Staff of Instruction and of Experiment Station Staff. 

tMerhber of Experiment Station Staff and Extension Staff. 

JMember of Staff of Instruction, Experiment Station Staff and Extension Staff. 



20 West Virginia University 

AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION STAFF 

GEORGE RICHARD LYMAN, Ph.D., Dean of the College of Agri- 
culture 

NAT TERRY FRAME, A.B., Director 

WILLIAM HENRY KENDRICK, B.S., Assistant Director in Charge 
of Boys' Club Work 

CHARLES HENRY HARTLEY, B.S., Assistant Director in Charge 
of Supplementary Instruction 

HAZEL HORSFALL, B.S., State 4-H Club Agent 

CHARLES ELLSWORTH STOCKDALE, B.S.Agr., Agricultural 
Editor 

EDWARD LEE SHAW, B.S.Agr., Sheep Specialist 

DAVID ROLLIN DODD, B.S.Agr., Agronomy Specialist 

HUGH WILLARD PRETTYMAN, B.S.Agr., Superintendent of the 
Packing School 

DEE CRANE, Potato Specialist 

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN CREECH, B.S.Agr., Specialist in Beef 
Cattle and Hogs 

THOMAS DAVIS GRAY, B.S., Specialist in Horticulture 

EVERETT CLIFTON SHERWOOD, M.S., Specialist in Plant Dis- 
eases 

GEORGE JAY VAN DERVEER, B.S., Assistant Poultry Specialist 

JEANNETTA WEIL, Chief Clerk in Charge of Clerks and Stenog- 
raphers 

MARY CATHRYN MORELAND, B.S.Agr., Specialist in Home In- 
dustries 

AARON H. RAPKING, B.D., Specialist in Rural Organizations 

JAMES VINCENT HOPKINS, B.S.Agr., Specialist in Dairying 

JWALTER W. ARMENTROUT, B.S.Agr., Marketing Specialist 

ORVILLE DEWEY WHITE, B.S.Agr., Poultry Specialist 



The College of Arts and Sciences 21 

LIBRARY STAFF 

LONNA DENNIS ARNETT, Ph.D., Librarian 

JENNIE DELAWDER BOUGHNER, A.B., Assistant Librarian 

EVALYN HITE, A.B., Assistant Librarian 

IDA VIRGINIA CARTER, Assistant Librarian 

ELEANOR EDDY KNUTTI, Assistant Librarian 

HELEN LOUISE EDMONDSON, A.B., Assistant Librarian 

CLYDE HAMPTON HALL, Student Assistant 

ODAS WILLIAMSON, Student Assistant 

MARY OLIVE REINER, Student Assistant 

WILLIAM CHARLES PIPER, Student Assistant 

MARY ROCAWICH, Student Assistant 

HENRY CLAY GREGORY, Student Assistant 

BENJAMIN GARNET REEDER, A.B., LL.B., Law Librarian 

KENNETH E. MICHAEL, Student Assistant in the Laiv Library 

OTHER OFFICERS 

DENNIS MARTIN WILLIS, LL.M., Financial Secretary 

DAVID DALE JOHNSON, A.M., Editor University Publications 

BERTHA BROWNING PURINTON, A.M., Assistant to the Regis- 
trar 

HARRY ADAM STANSBURY, B.S., Director of Athletics 

CHANDLER LINN BROOKS, Superintendent of Buildings and 
Grounds 

ISABEL HAYES, Preceptress of the Woman's Hall 

ELIZABETH B. ABBOTT, Assistant Preceptress at the Woman's 
Hall Annex 

WILLIAM J. JONES, Jr., B.S., Director University Y. M. C. A. 

KATHERINE BUTLER, B.A., General Secretary University Y. W. 
C. A. 



22 West Virginia University 

FRANK ROY YOKE, A.B., Alumni Secretary 

CHARLES ROYAL KESSEL, B.S., M.D., University Physician 

EMERSON CARNEY, In charge of University Book Store 

LUCY STONE KELTON, Dietitian 

EDITH W. BEYER, R.N., University Nurse 

THE ATHLETIC BOARD 

Faculty Members: Director STANSBURY (Ex-officio), Professor 
S. J. MORRIS and Mr. HARTLEY. 

Alumni Members: GILBERT B. MILLER, Morgantown, W. Va. 
(Term expires June 30, 1925), FRED B. DEEM, Clarksburg, W. 
Va. (Term expires June 30, 1926). 

Student Members: R. M. HAWLEY, (Term expires June 30, 1926), 
K. D. BOWERS, (Term expires June 30, 1925). 

STANDING COMMITTEES 

Entrance: The President and deans of the three colleges admitting 
Freshmen. 

Classification and Grades: Professors HARE, TROTTER, GRUM- 
BEIN, BONAR and Associate Professor DADISMAN. 

Graduate Work: Professors STATHERS, GIDDINGS, FORMAN, 
L. B. HILL and HARRIS. 

Public Exercises and Entertainments: Professors KAY and 
BLACK, Director Y. M. C. A., Director Y. W. C. A., President 
Student Council and Mr. HARTLEY (Secretary). 

Prizes: Professor VICKERS, Dean MADDEN, Professors COX, 
AMBLER, and CHIDESTER. 

Library: Dr. ARNETT, Professors ARMSTRONG, SIMPSON, 
HAYES, CLARK, BROWN, S. MORRIS, and DORSEY. 

Women Students: Dean FULTON, Professor R. H. COLWELL, 
Assistant Professor POLLOCK, Miss FLORA HAYES, Miss 
GRIFFIN, and Miss ISABEL HAYES. 

University Publications: Professors JOHNSON, BARBE, CAN- 
NADAY, HODGE' and DICKINSON, Mr. STOCKDALE and 

Assistant Professor KING. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 2; * 

Standing Committees — (Continued) 

Student Publications: Professors CHITWOOD, R. L. MORRIS 
and BANCROFT, and Associate Professors REED and SPAN- 
GLER. 

Summer School: President TROTTER, Mr. FRIEND, DEAN CAL- 
LAHAN, Dean LYMAN, and Professor DEAHL. 

Military and Gymnasium Board: Major DEVORE, Dean SIMP- 
SON and Director STANSBURY. 

Social Affairs: Professors DARBY and KAY, Dean STONE, Dean 
FULTON, Major DEVORE, Miss ISABEL HAYES and Miss 
GRIFFIN. 

Student and Fraternity Standings: Professors REESE, J. R. 
TROTTER and PEAIRS. 

Research: Professors REESE, COX, EIESLAND, JACOBSON, 
KNIGHT, DAVIS, DORSEY, and BISHOP. 

Fraternities: Mr. W. S. JOHN (Delta Tau Delta), Professor 
REESE (Beta Theta Pi), Mr. WILLIS (Phi Sigma Kappa), 
Professor HARDMAN (Sigma Nu), Dr. ARNETT (Sigma Chi), 
Professor VICKERS (Phi Kappa Psi), Professor ARMSTRONG 
(Kappa Alpha), Assistant Professor GROW (Sigma Phi Ep- 
silon), Associate Professor DADISMAN (Kappa Sigma), Mr. 
GLEN HUNTER (Phi Kappa Sigma), Professor COX (Theta 
Chi), Assistant Professor SPRAY (Sigma Lambda Pi), Profes- 
sor VAN LIERE (Phi Beta Pi), Dean SIMPSON (Phi Sigma 
Nu), Professor S. J. MORRIS (Kappa Psi), Mr. BENNETT, 
(Alpha Gamma Rho), Mr. BOOTH, (Tau Kappa Epsilon), and 
Dean STONE, (Pi Lambda Phi). 

Sororities: Professor COLWELL (Alpha Xi Delta), Mrs. HITE 
(Kappa Kappa Gamma), Mrs. BARBE (Chi Omega), Mrs. 
REED (Pi Beta Phi), Mrs. HUBERT HILL (Delta Gamma), 
and Mrs. I. E. ROGERS (Alpha Delta Pi). 

University Etension: Director FRAME, Professors COLWELL, 
L. B. HILL, KAY, AMBLER, HAYES, BONAR, MACLIN and 
HARRIS, Associate Professor REED, Assistant Professor Mc- 
GARRY, Dean STONE, and Mr. YOKE. 



The University 

DESCRIPTION OF THE INSTITUTION 

LOCATION. 

Morgantown, the seat of the University, is the county seat of 
Monongalia county. It is a town of twelve thousand inhabitants, 
located on the Monongahela river and on the Baltimore and Ohio Rail- 
road, the Morgantown and Kingwood Railroad, and the Monongahela 
Railway, 103 miles east of Wheeling and the same distance south of 
Pittsburgh. 

The University campus borders the Monongahela river. It com- 
prises about fifty acres. The University farms, a mile distant from 
the campus, contain in all almost seven hundred acres. 

HISTORY. 

Wes't Virginia University originated from the national land grant 
act of June 2, 1862, and from the subsequent action of the state legis- 
lature in accepting and carrying out the provisions of the act. On 
January 9, 1866, the board of trustees of the Monongalia Academy at 
Morgantown tendered to the legislature for the use of the contem- 
plated state or land grant college, all its property, including Wood- 
burn Female Seminary, on condition that the college should be located 
at Morgantown. On January 30, 1867, the legislature accepted the 
property and on February 7 passed an act permanently establishing 
"The Agricultural College of West Virginia" and authorizing the 
governor to appoint eleven suitable persons as a board of visitors. 

The eleven visitors held the first meeting on April 3, 1867, at 
which time they appointed Alexander Martin president and estab- 
lished collegiate, scientific and agricultural departments of instruc- 
tion. 

By an act of December 4, 1868, the name of the college was 
changed to ")Vest Virginia University" and the "board of visitors" 
to the "board of regents." July 1, 1919, the "board of regents" was 
merged in "the state board of education." 

The dates of the establishment of the special colleges and schools 
now comprised in the University are as follows: The College of Law, 
1878; the College of Engineering, 1887; the Agricultural Experiment 
Station, 1888; the College of Agriculture, 1897; the School of Music, 
1897; the School of Medicine, 1902. 

The University has had nine regular presidents. Alexander Mar- 



26 West Virginia University 

tin resigned in 1875. He was succeeded by John W. Scott (acting 
president), 1875-77; John Rhey Thompson, 1877-81; Daniel Boardman 
Purinton (acting president), 1881-82; William L. Wilson, 1882-83; 
Robert C. Berkeley (chairman of the faculty), 1883-85; Eli Marsh 
Turner, 1885-93; Powell Benton Reynolds (acting president), 1893-95; 
James L. Goodnight, 1895-97; Jerome Hall Raymond, 1897-01; Daniel 
Boardinan Purinton, 1901-11; Thomas Edward Hodges, 1911-14; 
Frank Butler Trotter (acting president, 1914-1916), 1916. 

GOVERNMENT AND ORGANIZATION. 

The financial and business affairs of the university and of all the 
other state educational institutions are directed by a State Board of 
Control consisting of three members appointed by the governor. This 
board also exercises a general control over the various public insti- 
tutions of the state. The academic control of the University (and also 
of the other educational institutions of the state, with the exception 
of the School for the Deaf, Dumb and Blind, The Boys' Reform School, 
and The Girls' Industrial School), is vested in The State Board of 
Education. The board is bi-partisan and consists of the state super- 
intendent of free schools (ex-officio), who is elected by the people, 
and of six other members who are appointed by the governor. 

The internal administration of the University is vested in the 
President, The Council of Administration, and the University Faculty. 
All matters of a purely administrative or executive nature are in the 
hands of the President alone or of the President and Council. The 
Faculty is the general legislative body; it fixes the requirements for 
entrance and graduation and has immediate direction of the general 
educational policy of the institution. Any proposal to change this 
policy in any respect must be made in writing at a meeting of the 
Faculty. 

Subordinate to the Faculty are a number of standing committees, 
appointed by the President. See page (?). 

The University organization embraces: 

The College of Arts and Sciences. 

The College of Engineering and Mechanic Arts. 

The College of Agriculture, including the West Virginia Agricul- 
tural experiment Station and the Division of Agricultural Ex- 
tension. 

The College of Law. 

The School of Medicine. 

The School of Music. 

The Summer School. 

The Division of Military Science and Tactics. 



The College of Aims and S iexce ; -• 

FUNDS. 

The funds for maintaining the University are derived from the 
following sources: (1) Interest on the land grant endowment of 
$115,750; (2) the Morrill fund; (3) the Hatch fund; (4) the Adams 
fund; (5) the Smith-Hughes and the Smith-Lever funds; (6) biennial 
appropriations by the state legislature; (7) fees and tuition; (8) in- 
come derived from the work of the Experiment Station and the Col- 
lege of Agriculture. 

BUILDINGS. 

There are now on the campus fourteen substantial brick and 
stone buildings. The administrative offices of the University are 
in Woodburn Hall. Funds fcr a new gymnasium, and for a new 
building for the department of chemistry, have been appropriated 
by the state legislature. 

THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY. 

The Library Building is a three-story stone structure, 135 feet 
long by 50 feet wide, with book room annex in the rear. The base- 
ment of the building is used for storage. On the first, or main floor, 
are the reading and reference rooms, rooms for the books on edu- 
cation and medicine, and the cataloguing rooms and the office of the 
librarian. On the upper floors are rooms for government docu- 
ments, for books on agriculture, engineering, and for class work. 

The University Library consists of the General and Law Libra- 
ries. The General Library is located in the Library Building and 
numbers about 74,000 volumes. The Law Library, located in the 
Law Building, numbers about 18,000 volumes. The library of the 
Agricultural Experiment Station is now shelved with and is a part 
of the General Library. About three hundred periodicals, including 
publications of societies, are received. Most of the county papers 
of the state are on file in the reading room. 



28 West Virginia University 



LABORATORIES. 



The University contains the following laboratories: 

Agronomy Oglebay Hall 

Anatomy Medical Building 

Animal Husbandry Oglebay Hall 

Bacteriology Medical Building 

Botany Oglebay Hall 

Chemistry Science Hall 

Chemical engineering ■ Mechanical Hall 

Dairy husbandry Oglebay Hall 

Educational psychology , Woodburn Hall 

Electrical engineering '_ Mechanical Hall 

Entomology Oglebay Hall 

Forging Mechanical Hall 

Foundry Mechanical Hall 

Fruit packing Inwood, W. Va. 

Geology Mechanical Hall 

Hydraulic engineering Mechanical Hall 

Histology Medical Building 

Horticulture Oglebay Hall 

Machine shop Mechanical Hall 

Metallurgy Mechanical Hall 

Mining engineering Mechanical Hall 

Mechanical drawing Mechanical Hall 

Oil and gas Mechanical Hall 

Pathology Medical Building 

Physiology 'Medical Building 

Physics Martin Hall 

Pharmacology Medical Building 

Pharmacy Woodburn Hall 

Pipe Fitting Mechanical Hall 

Plant pathology Oglebay Hall 

Poultry Husbandry Oglebay Hall 

Power Mechanical Hall 

Psychology : Library 

.Sheet metal -. Mechanical Hall 

Testing Mechanical Hall 

Road material testing Mechanical Hall 

Veterinary science Oglebay Hall 

Woodworking Mechanical Hall 

Zoology Woodburn Hall 

A detailed description of the various engineering and agricultural 
laboratories as well as of the laboratories of the School of Medicine 
will be found in connection with the announcements of these depart- 
ments on later pages of this catalogue. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 29 

MILITARY TRAINING. 

Military training- is prescribed for all regular male students in 
the University below the rank of junior unless such students are more 
than twenty-three years of age upon their entrance to the University. 
Certain exceptions to this requirement are stated in full in the de- 
tailed announcements of the Division of Military Science. 

Enrollment in the Division of Military Science or appointment 
as a state cadet does not render the student liable for military service 
either to the State or to the United States government. 

A unit of the Reserve Officers' Training Corps was established at 
the University in 1916. An Engineer Unit, Senior Division of the 
Reserve Officers' Training Corps was established in 1919. 

ATHLETICS. 

The department of athletics, as now organized, is under the 
supervision of a director. Football, baseball, basketball, wrestling, 
track, cross-country and tennis teams are organized and trained each 
season. All University athletics are under the control of the ath- 
letic board. This board is composed of the director of athletics, two 
other members of the University faculty, two alumni of the Univer- 
sity, and two students. 

The faculty members of the board are appointed by the President 
of the University and serve during his pleasure. One faculty mem- 
ber is designated as chairman of the board. He is the executive offi- 
cer of the board and has no vote except in case of a tie. 

The alumni members are elected )by the Alumni Association at 
their annual meeting at commencement for a term not exceeding two 
years. Not more than one alumni member shall be a resident of 
Monongalia County. 

The student members of the board are elected by the student 
body by ballot. One member in full standing in the junior class, a 
candidate for a degree, is elected to serve two years at a poll held 
not later than June 1 of each year. All details of these elections 
are in the hands of the Inter-Class Council in consultation with the 
President of the University. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR WOMEN. 

Physical education is required of all freshman women through- 
out the college year. Three hours a week is devoted to indoor and 
outdoor exercise and to lectures on hygiene. A credit of one hour 
for each semester is given to those who satisfactorily complete the 
work. 



30 West Virginia University 

HEALTH SERVICE. 

All students of the University pay a medical fee of $2.50 each 
semester, in return for which they receive free drug service from 
the department of pharmacy of the University, and free medical at- 
tention, including minor surgery (specialties excepted) from the Uni- 
versity physician. 

Students wishing to avail themselves of the Health Service are 
expected to call at the office of the University physician. His office 
hours are 9 to 12 and 2 to 5 daily except ^Sunday. 

If students are unable to leave their rooms the physician will 
attend them at their residences and may be summoned by telephon- 
ing 475 during office hours or 1295 at other times. 

In case the student cannot communicate with the University 
physician he is privileged to call another physician, the University 
paying for this first call, but this service 'must be terminated after 
the first call unless the student wishes to pay for further services 
himself. 

The University maintains a student infirmary, on the first floor 
of which are the waiting rooms and the offices of the physician and 
the nurse. On the second 'floor is an isolation room where students 
having contagious disease may be isolated from the other students 
and treated. 

A three-'bed ward is maintained for the treatment of any student, 
who may require only a day or two of treatment, or for any student 
needing hospital treatment w;ho is unable to pay for hospital service. 
This is mot to be construed as general hospital service for the student 
body, nor does the University render nursing service at the rooms of 
the students. The student nurse is available only for such service as 
can be rendered at the infirmary. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 31 

UNIVERSITY FEES AND EXPENSES. 

Class officers will issue class cards only on presentation of the 
receipt for the proper tuition and fees, signed by the registrar and 
the financial secretary. 
Tuition and Fees for each semester. Residents. 1 Non-residents. 

College of Arts and Sciences Free $ 50.00 

College of Engineering Free 50.00 

College of Agriculture Free 50.00 

College of Law $ 25.00 50.00 

School of Medicine 25.00 100.00 

Summer School 10.00 15.00 

Contingent fee 15.00 15.00 

Student activity fee 5.00 5.00 

Medical fee 2.50 2.50 

Registration fee 2 2.00 2.00 

Diploma fee 3 10.00 10.00 

Students' record fee 1 1.00 1.00 

REFUNDING OF TUITION AND FEES. 

Students who withdraw from the University for good and suffi- 
cient reasons during the first two weeks of the semester will have 
their fees refunded upon making application to the President. 

COST OF A YEAR'S WORK. 

Board and lodging may be obtained in Morgantown for from 
$8.00 to $10.00 a week. Furnished rooms may be obtained at from 
$2.00 to $3.50 a week for each tenant with two in a room. Board in 
private families or in students' boarding clubs costs from $6.00 to 
$7.00 a week. A student's washing will cost usually from $10.00 to 
$18.00 a year, his text books from $8.00 to $30.00 a year, and his col- 
lege fees $40.00 a year. Traveling expenses, clothing, and miscel- 
laneous expenses will depend largely upon the tastes and habits of the 
individual. In general it may be said that the legitimate cost of a 
nine months' term of residence at the University ranges from $400.00 
to $650.00, exclusive of traveling expenses. 

See page 45 for schedule of prices for rooms in the women's 
dormitories. 



iStudents are considered to be resident students if at the time of their registra- 
tion their parents or guardians have been residents and citizens of the State for* at 
least one year. No non-resident student shall gain residence entitling him to re- 
duction or exemption from tuition merely by his attendance at the University. — Order 
of the Board of Education. 

2As a reward for prompt registration this fee is remitted to all students who 
procure class cards during the first three days of the first semester, and the first 
two days of the second semester. Students whose work is exclusively in music are 
excused from payment of the $2.00 resigistration fee. 

3The diploma fee is payable by all students at the beginning of the semester in 
whch they expect to receive their degree or diploma. 

4This fee is charged for furnishing a copy of a student's record in the registrar's 
office after the regular semester reports have been issud. 



32 West Virginia University 

ADMISSION TO THE UNIVERSITY. 

METHODS OF ADMISSION. 

(Students are admitted to the University either by examination or 
on certificate from an accredited preparatory school. In the latter 
case the certificate must set forth the work of the student in detail. 
Diplomas or certificates of a general nature are not sufficient. 

Candidates for admission to the University must be at least six- 
teen years of age. They must present certificates of good moral 
character and, if from other colleges or universities, must present 
letters of honorable dismissal. 

Candidates for admission who do not present entrance certificates, 
or who come from other institutions of learning without letters of 
honorable dismissal, may, at the discretion of the registrar, be allow- 
ed to register provisionally. In every such case the registrar will 
make immediate inquiry of the institution from which the applicant 
comes and if satisfactory certificates of credit and good standing can 
not be obtained the registration will be cancelled and the fees paid by 
the applicant will be returned. A provisional registration will not 
ordinarily be continued for a longer period than one month. 

ENTRANCE CREDITS. 

The requirements for admission to the various colleges of the 
University are stated in terms of units. 

A unit in any subject represents the amount of work that may 
be done in a standard high school in a year of thirty-six weeks, with 
five recitation periods of not less than forty minutes each, per week. 
In courses where laboratory work is required, from two to three hours 
of laboratory work is considered the equivalent of one hour of recita- 
tion, according to the amount of outside preparation required in con- 
nection with such work. 

In accrediting West Virginia high schools the University follows 
the classification made by the state supervisor of high schools. Grad- 
uates of accredited schools receive credit for the work certified, with 
the understanding, however, that no student may enter any college 
of the University until he has credit for fifteen units, i. e., the work 
of a standard four-year high school course. 

Graduates of the state normal schools and of all other schools in 
good standing will receive credit for work properly certified. 

Certificates of entrance credits should be on the blank form pre- 
scribed by the University or on a similar form, so that credit values 
may be readily computed. These certificates should be sent in to the 
registrar at least two weeks before the applicant presents himself for 



The College of Arts and Sciences 33 

matriculation. Failure to do this may result in vexatious delay in 
registration and may render the student liable to the payment of the 
$2.00 registration fee. After the certificate has been considered by 
the Committee on Entrance and the credits recorded, it becomes the 
property of the University and is permanently filed in the registrar's 
office. 

PRESCRIBED AND ELECTIVE UNITS. 

A. The following groups are required: 

(1) Three or four units of English. 1 

(2) Three units of a second subject. 

(3) Two units of a third subject. 

(4) Four units elective. 

Note: In the above must be included two units of 
mathematics : one of algebra and one of plane geometry. 

B. The work indicated in A must include: For admission to the 
College of Law: 2 units of Latin. For admission to the Col- 
lege of Engineering: 1% units of algebra, 1 unit of plane 
geometry, and V2 unit of solid geometry. For admission to 
the School of Medicine: 2 units of Latin, 1 unit of history, 
1 unit of algebra, and 1 unit of plane geometry. 

C. Work in the following subjects not to exceed the number of 
units placed after each subject will be accepted: 



English 


4 units 


Physics 




1 unit 


Foreign Languages 2 




Chemistry 




1 unit 


Latin 


4 units 


Biology* 




1 unit 


Greek 


3 units 


Botany 4 




1 unit 


French 


3 units 


Geology 




1 unit 


German 


3 units 


Zoology 4 




1 unit 


Spanish 


3 units 


General science 


1 unit 


Italian 


3 units 


Physical geoj 


?raphy 


Vz unit 


Education 


2 units 


Physiology 




V2 unit 


Science 3 




Hygiene and 


sanitation 


V2 unit 



1A student entering with only three units in English must take six hours in 
college English as elective above the mnimum requirements for the degree for which 
he is a candidate. 

2Not less than two units of one foreign language will be accepted for entrance 
unfless supplemented by further work in college in the same language to complete 
a minimum equivalent of two units of entrance. Six hours of college work are ac- 
cepted as equivalent to one entrance unit in a foregn language. 

3A group of two or three units in science may be made by combining one unit 
each of any of the following : physics, chemistry, botany, biology, zoology, geology. 

4lf a student presents either botany or zoology for entrance he can not have 
credit for more than one-half unit of biology ; if he presents both botany and zoo- 
logy, no credit in biology will be allowed. 



34 



West Virginia University 



Mathematics 

Algebra 

Plane geometry- 
Solid geometry 

Trigonometry 
History and Economics 

History 

Civics and American 

history 

Economics 

'Sociology 
Music 1 (applied) 
Drawing 

Free-hand drawing 





Mechanical drawing 


1 unit 


2 units 


Commercial geography 


V2 unit 


1 unit 


Commercial law 


V2 unit 


V2 unit 


Vocational subjects (not to exceed 


V2 unit 


four units in all.) 






Agriculture 


3 units 


3 units 


Household arts 


3 units 




Manual training 


3 units 


1 unit 


Bookkeeping or book- 




1 unit 


keeping and commer- 




1 unit 


cial arithmetic 


2 units 


2 units 


Shorthand and type- 






writing 


2 units 



1 unit 



CONDITIONAL ADMISSION. 

Students who have credit for fifteen units of secondary school 
work but who can not meet the specific requirements (see A and 
B above) of the college they desire to enter may register as con- 
ditional freshmen in that college. Such students must make up all 
deficiencies before they can be classified as sophomores. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS. 



Persons who do not desire to become candidates for a degree, 
may, by permission of the Committee on Entrance and of the faculty 
or dean of the college which they wish to enter, be admitted as special 
students, subject to the following provisions: 

1. Special students must as a rule be twenty-one years of age 
or over (twenty- two in the College of law). 

2. Special students must satisfy at least nine units of the re- 
quirements for admission, including two units of English. (For aca- 
demic requirements for admission as special students in the College 
of Law see the announcements of that college). 

3. Every application for admission as a special student must be 
presented in writing to the Committee on Entrance and must set forth 
fully the applicant's reason, together with a detailed statement of 
the studies he desires to pursue. 

4. Special students are subjected in all respects to the usual rules 
relating to registration and scholarship. They may be assigned to 
classes for which they apply, it being understood, however, that ad- 
mission to any class rests entirely with the instructor in charge and 
further, that admission to any class when so granted does not neces- 
sarily imply credit for prerequisites. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 35 

ADVANCED STANDING. 

Applications for advanced standing on account of work of college 
grade done before entrance to the University should be made to the 
Committee on Entrance not later than two weeks after the applicant's 
matriculation. Certificates of college credits must be presented on a 
separate form from the entrance credits. 

If no certificates are offered or if those offered are considered by 
the Committee on Entrance to be irregular or insufficient, the com- 
mittee will arrange for an examination of the applicant. In this 
case the dean of the proper college will issue examination cards on 
which after examination the head of each department will report to 
the Committee on Entrance the numbers, names, and credit values 
of the courses, if any, for which the applicant is entitled to credit. 

CREDITS. 

A credit or semester-hour represents the amount of work done 
in one semester (eighteen weeks), in one recitation hour with two 
preparation hours a week. From two to three hours of laboratory 
work is considered equivalent to an hour of recitation, according to 
the amount of outside work assigned in connection with the laboratory 
hours. 

Fewer than ten hours in an ancient or modern language will not 
be counted toward any University degree, diploma or certificate un- 
less work in the same language has been offered for entrance. 

MAXIMUM AND MINIMUM WORK. 

A maximum and minimum number of hours of which a student 
may register in any one semester is established for each college. A 
student desiring to do irregular work, more or less than the pre- 
scribed number of hours in any college, must obtain permission from 
the committee on students' courses and hours in that college. 

Registration for more than the specified maximum work shall 
be permitted only for the removal of conditions or better adjustment 
of schedules and not in any case for the purpose of shortening the 
time regularly required for the work of the degree sought by the 
student. 

SUBSTITUTION FOR REQUIRED COURSES. 

A student who desires to substitute another course in place of 
any course prescribed in his curriculum or required for the degree 
toward which he is working, must obtain permission for such sub- 
stitution from the committee on students' courses and hours in his 
college, but there can be no substitution from group to group. 



36 West Virginia University 

WITHDRAWAL FROM THE UNIVERSITY. 

A (student desiring to withdraw from the University must apply- 
to the President, or, in his absence, to the registrar, for permission. 
When the withdrawal permit has been secured it must be presented 
by the student to his class officer, who will approve it and forward 
it to the registrar. Students who withdraw from the University with- 
out permission will have their grades reported as zero at the end of 
semester and then be indefinitely suspended. 

ABSENCES. 

Students are required to 'be present at every recitation and ex- 
amination of the courses for which they are registered. Punctuality, 
regular attendance, and attention to the work of the class room will 
ibe largely considered in determining the class grade of the student. 

Students who find it necessary to be absent from Morgantown 
while the University is in session must secure permission, in advance 
from the President or the dean of men. 

When a student has seven unexcused absences he is suspended 
until the end of the semester or until the dean of his college alone or 
in conference with the President, restores him to good standing. 

Before the final examinations the dean of men reports all the 
unexcused absences of the semester to the instructors who give these 
absences consideration in making up their final grades. 

If a student's absences in any course exceed twelve percent of 
the total number of recitations in the course he is barred from the 
final examination in that course unless special permission is given 
him to take such examination by the Committee on Classification and 
Grades on recommendation of the instructor and the dean of his col- 
lege. 

In case of absences at the beginning of either semester a deduc- 
tion of two per cent, from the final grade in every subject is made 
for each exercise missed, for all absences not more than seven in 
number, unless such absences are excused by the Committee on Clas- 
sification and Grades. If the absences are more than seven in num'ber 
full credit for the course is not given, unless such absences are 
excused by the committee and the work missed made up to the sat- 
isfaction of the instructor. Excuses for such absences must be pre- 
sented to the committee on special blanks furnished for that purpose. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 37 

EXAMINATIONS AND GRADES. 

Method of Grading. In practically all the courses offered in the 
University the student receives both a preliminary or mid-semester 
grade and a final grade. A grade of 100% is regarded as perfect and 
70% as passing. Mid-semester grades are not entered on the regis- 
trar's record. 

Final examinations are held during the last week in each semes- 
ter. 

Beginning with the year 1923-1924 no students shall be eligible 
for graduation who has not attained an average grade of 75 in all the 
courses done after that time; provided, however, that any student who 
has completed the required number of hours for graduation but whose 
average is not 75 may be allowed to offer two additional hours for 
and in satisfaction of each point below 75 but not below 73, and three 
additional hours for each point below 73 but not below 70. 

Conditions and Failures. If the final grade of any student for any 
course is below sixty, it is recorded as a 'failure," and the student 
must take the course again if he desires credit for it. If the final 
grade is sixty, or over, but below seventy, it is recorded as a "con- 
dition," and the student shall have the privilege of a second exam- 
ination. A condition not removed within the following semester be- 
comes a failure, unless special permission to postpone the examination 
is obtained from the Committee on Classification and Grades. If the 
final grade after a second examination is again below seventy it is re- 
corded as a failure. 

Reports to Parents. A report of each student's work is made at 
the close of each semester, either to the student himself or to his 
parent or guardian. A complete record is also kept in the registrar's 
office. The fee for making a copy of this record after the semester 
reports have been sent out is one dollar. 

In case where a student's work is unsatisfactory as shown by 
the mid-semester test, a mid-semester report will also be made both 
to the parent or guardian and to the student. 

SUSPENSIONS. 

1. Any student who fails either to make a standing of seventy 
per cent in courses amounting to at least half of the total number of 
semester hours for which he is registered, or to make an average 
standing of at least sixty per cent in all of his courses for any 
semester is suspended from the University for the succeeding semes- 



38 West Virginia University 

ter. If, however, the failure as above is due to the abandonment of 
any class, or' to withdrawal from the University without permission, 
or to absence from examination without reasonable excuse, the sus- 
pension becomes indefinite. 

Any student whose average standing in all studies as shown by 
the preliminary or mid-semester report is less than fifty per cent is 
suspended from the University for the remainder of the semester. 

2. If a student suspended by the operation of the above rule re- 
enters the University and again becomes subject to it, his suspension 
becomes indefinite. 



36. 



For rules governing suspension for unexcused absences, see page 



WORK DONE OUT OF RESIDENCE. 



The doing of regular residence courses in absentia is discouraged. 
In cases of courses begun at the University and not completed by 
reason of illness or otherwise, however, permission to complete the 
work in absentia under the direction of the regular University instruc- 
tors may be granted by the Committee on Classification and Grades; 
'but in such cases credit shall be given only upon report of a grade of 
not less than eighty per cent on final examination. 

The foregoing statement does not apply to University Extension 
Courses. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 39 

DEGREES. 

All University degrees are conferred by the State Board of Edu- 
cation upon recommendation of the University faculty. Dagrees are 
granted only once in each year at the annual University commence- 
ment. 

Candidates must be present in person to receive their degrees 
unless excused by the State Board of Education. 

BACCALAUREATE DEGREES. 
Credits Required. 

The various baccalaureate degrees conferred by the University 
and the number of semester hours of work required for each degree 
are as follows: 

Bachelor of Arts, (A.B.) 

Regular course 128 Hrs. 

Combined course for A.B. and LL.B. degrees.... 124 Hrs. 

(96 hours in College of Arts and Sciences and 

first year course, 28 hours, in College of Law.) 
Bachelor of Science, (B.S.). 

Combined course, preliminary to degree in 

medicine 136 Hrs. 

(64 hours in College of Arts and Sciences, and 

two years' work, 68 to 72 hours, in School of 

Medicine.) 
Combined course, preliminary to degree in 

Engineering 128 Hrs. 

Bachelor of Laws, (LL.B.) 150 Hrs. 

(64 hours in the College of Arts and Sciences 

and 86 hours in the College of Law.) 
Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering, 

(B.S.M.E.) 148 Hrs. 

Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering, 

(B.S.C.E.) 148 Hrs. 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering, 

(B.S.E.E.) 148 Hrs. 

Bachelor of Science in Engineering of Mines, 

(B.S.E.M.) 148 Hrs. 

JBachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering, 

(B.S.Chem.E.) 148 Hrs. 

Bachelor of Science in Agriculture, (B.S.Agr.) 144 Hrs. 
Bachelor of Science in Home Economics, 

(B.S.H.E.) 128 Hrs. 

Bachelor of Science in Public Health 142 Hrs. 

Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy 144 Hrs. 

Bachelor of Music 136 Hrs. 



40 West Virginia University 

Requirements as to Residence. 

Students wHo come to the University from other colleges or uni- 
versities are advised to make the transfer not later than the beginning 
of the junior year and in no case will a student who matriculates in 
the University later than October 1 in any year be permitted to receive 
a degree at the next commencement. 

In special cases students who desire to leave the University at 
the close of the junior year to enter another institution with the pur- 
pose of taking a combined course leading to two degrees or of prepar- 
ing for graduate study may, upon application beforehand to the Com- 
mittee of Classification and Grades, be permitted to do the work of 
the senior year, or a part thereof at such other institution and to 
receive the bachelor's degree from the University upon the presenta- 
tion of the proper credits. 

In no case, however, will a student be granted a bachelor's degree 
from this University who has not done either a total of ninety hours 
of his work or the last thirty hours of it in actual residence at the 
University. 

GRADUATE DEGREES. 

The University does not confer the degree, Doctor of Philosophy, 
but will certify to other institutions such graduate work as may be 
applicable toward this degree. 

The University confers the following master's degrees: Master 
of Arts (A.M.), Master of Science (M.S.), Master of Science in Me- 
chanical Engineering (M.S.M.E.), Master of Science in Civil Engi- 
neering (M.S.C.E.), Master of Science in Electrical Engineering 
(M.S.E.E.), Master of Science in Engineering of Mines (M.S.E.M.), 
and Master of Science in Agriculture (M.S.Agr.). 

For further information regarding graduate work see page 61 
of the University Catalogue. 



The College op Arts and Sciences 41 

GENERAL INFORMATION. 
DISCIPLINE. 

The rules and regulations which students are required to observe 
are few, simple and reasonable; civil and orderly conduct; punctuality 
and regularity in attendance upon all required exercises; reasonable 
diligence in the performance of the work prescribed, and abstinence 
from vices. 

Students who do not comply with these requirements will not be 
allowed to remain in the University. 

All matters of discipline are in charge of the President of the 
University in consultation with the dean of the college or head of the 
division of the University in which the student concerned is enrolled. 

THE CONVOCATION. 

The University Convocation is held every Wednesday morning at 
ten o'clock in Commencement Hall, under the direction of the Chap- 
lain of the University. No classes or other University exercises 
are held at this hour, and opportunity is afforded for all members 
of the University, both instructors and students, to attend the meet- 
ing. The hour is occupied by lectures and addresses, discussion of 
student interests and problems, and the consideration of questions 
relating to the general University welfare. 

In connection with the weekly convocation brief devotional exer- 
cises are held. The singing at these exercises is in charge of the 
Director of the School of Music. Attendance is entirely voluntary. 

CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS. 

The University Young Men's Christian Association is a voluntary 
association of college men for the purpose of promoting and directing 
widely varied student activities for a religious motive. Through its 
national and international it joins in fellowship with students around 
the world. Membership is open to all men of the University. 

The Young Women's Christian Association is an organization 
for a similar purpose. Membership is open to all women enrolled in 
the University. 

An important feature of the work of each association is the 
maintenance of an employment bureau which enables a number of 
young men and women to find sufficient work to pay their expenses in 
college. 

Each association employes a secretary, and students desiring in- 
formation regarding employment, or other activities of the associ- 
ations should address one or the other of these officers. 



42 West Virginia University 

THE ALUMNI SECRETARY. 

Under the" joint auspices of the University and the University 
Alumni Association an ahimni secretary is employed who 'gives his 
full time to the promotion of the interests of the Association and 
the furthering of closer contact and cooperation between the Uni- 
versity and its graduates and former students. Mr. Frank Roy Yoke 
of the class of 1903 is the present secretary. His office is in the 
Library. 

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF UNIVERSITY PROFESSORS. 

The West Virginia University Branch of the American Associ- 
ation of University Professors now has a membership of more than 
fifty. The present officers are: Professor R. A. Armstrong, presi- 
dent, and Professor F. E. Clark, secretary. 

HONOR SOCIETIES. 

Phi Beta Kappa. The Alpha of West Virginia Chapter of the 
Phi Beta Kappa Society is established at the University. Stated 
meetings or public exercises of the Society are held twice annually: 
the anniversary meeting on December 5, and the annual meeting 
during commencement week. The honor of membership may be con- 
ferred upon candidates for the degree of (Bachelor of Arts who have 
maintained a high scholarship rank during their college course; also 
upon members of the faculty and alumni of the University, and 
upon distinguished citizens of the state. 

Sigma Xi Club. The national organization of the Society of the 
Sigma Xi is represented in the University by the Sigma Xi Club of 
West Virginia University. The purpose of the national society and 
of the local club is the encouragement of scientific research. 

Tau Beta Pi. The West Virginia Alpha chapter of the national 
engineering honor association of Tau Beta Pi was established in the 
College of Engineering in 1922. Students who rank in scholarship 
among the upper one-eighth of their class are eligible to election in 
their junior year and all who rank among the upper one-fourth of 
the class are likewise eligible in their senior year. These together 
with alumni and honorary [members constitute the chapter. 

Alpha Zeta. The West Virginia chapter of Alpha Zeta, the na- 
tional agricultural honor fraternity, was instituted in the College of 
Agriculture in 1921. (Sophomores and upper classmen who maintain 
high standing in scholarship and rank among the upper two-fifths of 
their respctive classes are eligible to membership. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 43 

Phi Epsilon Omicron. The Lamda Chapter of Phi Epsilon Omi- 
cron, one of- the national professional organizations in home economics, 
was established at the University in November, 1923. Its purpose 
is to promote the moral and intellectual development of its members; 
to help to develop leadership; and to advance home economics. Mem- 
bership is open to juniors and seniors in home economics who rank 
in the upper two-fifths of the class in scholarship. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS. 

There are in the University various societies and clubs, devoted 
chiefly to the educational, social and athletic interests of the students. 
Several Greek letter fraternities and sororities have established chap- 
ters at the University and most of these occupy their own chapter 
houses. 

Some of the More important of these organizations are: The 
English Club, The Beowulf Gedryht, The Educational Club, The Phil- 
hellenic Club, -The West Virginia University Scientific Society, The 
Engineering Society, The University Grange, The University Dra- 
matic Club, The University Choir, and the Philharmonic Orchestra. 

UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS. 

The following publications are now issued regularly at the Uni- 
versity: 

1. The West Virginia University Bulletins, issued monthly dur- 
ing the College Year. The series includes the Catalogue of the Uni- 
versity, the Announcements of the various separate colleges and 
schools and the quarterly Alumni Bulletins. 

2. The various bulletins and circulars of the Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station. 

3. The bulletins of the College of Engineering. 

4. Circulars of the Agricultural Extension Division. These in- 
clude the Farmers' Club Series, the Farm Women's Club Series, and 
the 4-H Suggestion Series. 

5. The West Virginia Law Quarterly, the official publication of 
the West Virginia Bar Association, edited by the faculty of the Col- 
lege of Law. 

6. The West Virginia Science Bulletin, issued annually by the 
West Virginia University Scientific Society. 



44 West Virginia University 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS. 

The Athenaeum, a semi-weekly college newspaper, is published 
by the students, who elect the editorial staff. 

The College Annual, The 'Monticola, is published by the junior 
class. 

The West Virginia Agriculturist, an illustrated monthly maga- 
zine, is issued by the students of the College of Agriculture. 

All student publications are under the supervision of a faculty 
committee on student publications. 

STUDENT SOCIAL LIFE. 

The social life of the students in the University is under the 
general supervision of the faculty Committee on Social Affairs. This 
committee has supervision of every social function given by the Uni- 
versity or by any organization within it, including fraternities, so- 
rorities and other student societies. Such social functions as balls, 
dances, picnics, excursions and receptions are supervised by this com- 
mittee. The committee approves all dance programs, supervises the 
issuance of invitations for functions of a general University nature 
and sees that all social affairs held in the University are properly 
conducted. 

WOMEN'S STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION. 

All women students of the University whose homes are not in 
Morgantown, whether they live in the Women's Hall, in sorority 
houses or in rooming houses in town, are members of the Student 
Government Association. The purpose of this association is to regu- 
late all matters pertaining to the student life of its members, to fur- 
ther in every way the spirit of unity among the women of the Uni- 
versity, to increase their sense of responsibility, and to be a medium 
for maintaining a high scholastic standard. 

The officers of the association include a president, vice-president, 
secretary, and treasurer. Representatives from each class, and house- 
presidents, with the officers, constitute an executive 'board, which fixes 
all rules of the association and enforces penalties for their violation. 
The officers and members of the executive board are elected annually 
by the association. The board is responsible to the faculty advisory 
board of the association for all matters pertaining to the social life 
of the students. This advisory board consists of the dean of women 
and two other members of the faculty appointed by the President 
of the University. 

In 1921 the association was admitted to active membership in 



The College of Arts and Sciences 45 

the Intercollegiate Association of Student Government for Women 
Students. 

DEAN OF MEN. 

The dean of men is the contact officer between the administra- 
tion and the men students of the University. He exercises a friendly 
supervision over the moral, social, and intellectual life of under- 
graduates. He is responsible for the administration of the rules 
regarding absences. He is a member of the faculty committee on 
social affairs. The dean's office is in Martin Hall. 

THE DEAN OF WOMEN. 

All the interests of the women students of the University are in 
charge of a special executive officer of the University, the dean of 
women. She is a member not only of the advisory board of the 
Student Government Association but also of the faculty social com- 
mittee. The dean's office is in the Library Building. 

LIVING ACCOMMODATIONS FOR WOMEN. 

All women in the University except those living at home are 
required to live in the dormitories, in sorority houses, or in rooming 
houses approved by the Dean of Women. 

Preliminary application for rooms should be made to the Dean 
of Women. Changes in rooming places made after the beginning 
of the semester may be made only with her approval. 

The Woman's Hall has rooms for 108 students and has a dining 
room which accommodates 300. The Annex has rooms for 40. Lists 
of approved rooming houses may be secured from the dean. Rooms 
may be engaged in advance either in the main dormitory or the an- 
nex, upon payment of a retaining fee of $10. This amount is later 
deducted from the first semester's rent. A student who, for any good 
reason, desires to relinquish a room thus engaged may have the fee 
refunded if she gives notice before August 15. 

The cost of rooms in the woman's dormitories is as follows: 
Woman's Hall 

First and second floor front $90.00 per year 

First and second floor rear 85.00 per year 

Third floor front 85.00 per year 

Third floor rear 80.00 per year 

Annex 

Single room 8O.00 per year 

Double room 65.00 to $75.00 

per year 
Board in the dining hall 6.00 per week 



46 West Virginia University 

BOARDING AND ROOMING PLACES. 

The matter of furnishing information to new students regarding 
suitable boarding and rooming places is in charge of the Y. M. C. A. 
and Y. W. C. A. of the University. On their arrival in Morgantown 
new students should come directly to Woodburn Hall, where they will 
find complete lists of approved rooms and boarding places and also 
upperclassmen who will help them in finding lodgings and in matri- 
culating. During the opening days of the semester, committees from 
the two Christian Associations meet new students at trains and are 
ready to render them every assistance possible. 

Young men desiring information in advance of their arrival in 
Morgantown, may address the University Y. M. C. A., Morgantown, 
W. Va. Young women may address Miss Martha T. Fulton, Dean 
of Women. 

AID FOR STUDENTS. 

The Employment Bureau, organized by the University Christian 
Association, undertakes to assist earnest and worthy students who 
are dependent upon their own efforts for the expenses of their edu- 
cation, to obtain various forms of employment in Morgantown. Pro- 
spective students desiring such aid should write to the secretary of 
the Y. M. C. A., or of the Y. W. C. A., before entering the University, 
stating the kind of work desired and the nature of past experience 
in any occupation. The work consists largely in waiting on table, 
caring for rooms and lawns, clerking in stores, stenographic services, 
etc. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 47 

PRIZES. 

The more important prizes offered in the University are: 

The Bryan Prize in Political Science. 

The Hon. William J. Bryan has given a sum of money, the annual 
income of which is to be offered as a prize to the student in the 
University who shall write the best essay on some subject in the 
science of government. The amount of the prize for the present is 
$21.00. The subject assigned for the year 1925-26 is, "A Suitable 
Short Ballot for West Virginia." 

The Tax Commission Prize. 

The members of the State Tax Commission of 1902, W. P. Hub- 
bard, Henry G. Davis, John K. Thompson, L. J. Williams and J. H. 
Holt, gave the sum of $1,350, later increased by unawarded sums 
to $1,500, the income of which is to be used annually as a prize for 
the "best original work bearing on matters of taxation in West Vir- 
ginia." The conditions of competition are determined by the 
Council of Administration. The amount of the prize at present is 
$90.00. The subject assigned for 1925-26 is, "Desirable Changes in 
the Methods of Securing Revenue for Incorporated Towns and Cities 
in West Virginia." 

Chi Omega Sorority Prize. 

The local chapter of the Chi Omega Sorority offers an annual 
prize of $25.00 to be awarded to the woman student who achieves the 
highest standing in Economics 1. The prize is offered to encourage 
interest in the study of economics among women students. To be eli- 
gible the student must have registered for at least fourteen hours of 
work for the semester. 



Alpha Delta Pi Sorority Prize. 

Alpha Delta Pi, a local sorority, offers an annual prize of ten 
($10.00) dollars, to be awarded to the woman student who shows 
most ability in applying her knowledge of sociology to social service 
work. Success in some definite form of social service work, done 
under competent supervision, is the basis of award. The award of 
this prize is made under the supervision of the professor of sociology. 



48 West Virginia University 

The James F. Brown Prize. 

Mr. James F. Brown, an alumnus of the University, "with a de- 
sire to stimulate the young men of the State to fuller consideration 
of the 'inalienable rights' of mankind, and especially those guaranteed 
'by the Constitution of the 'State and of the United States," has con- 
tributed to the University the sum of five thousand dollars to be in- 
vested and the income is to !be "used as a prize for the best essay or 
paper each year on the subject of the individual liberties of the citi- 
zen as guaranteed by the constitution." The income may be given as 
a single prize, or it may be divided into a first and second prize. 
For the present the award will be made as a single prize, $300.00 in 
amount. Any senior or any graduate of any college of University, 
within one year after receiving any tbachelor's degree, may compete 
for this prize, but no holder of any graduate degree may become 
a competitor. The subject assigned for 1925-26 is, "Freedom of the 
Press Under Our Constitutions." 

The Cassell W. Mowrey Memorial Prize. 

In memory of Cassell W. Mowrey, a former member, Brooke's 
Inn of Phi Delta Phi offers a prize of $20.00 in gold to be awarded 
annually to the member of the first year class of the College of 
Law who attains the highest scholastic standing for the year. Only 
candidates for the LL.B. degree are eligible for this prize. 

Inter- Fraternity Scholastic Trophies. 

Arleigh Lee Darby, Professor of Romance Languages, offers a 
silver cup known as the Inter-Fratenity Scholastic Trophy. It is 
awarded at the end of the year to the fraternity having the highest 
average scholarship standing for that year and remains in the pos- 
session of that fraternity during the following year. The cup be- 
comes the permanent property of the fraternity that first wins' it five 
times. 

Aaron Arkin, formerly Professor of Pathology and Bacteriology, 
offers a silver cup to be called the "Inter-Sorority 'Scholastic Trophy." 
This prize will be awarded at the end of the academic year to the 
sorority having the highest average scholarship standing for the year. 
It will be in possession of that sorority for the following year. The 
cup will become the permanent property of the sorority that first wins 
it five times. 

The conditions upon which the awards in the several contests are 
made may 'be learned upon application at the President's office, or 
to the members of the committee on prizes. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 49 

BUREAU OF RECOMMENDATION. 

The Bureau of Recommendation, under the direction of the de- 
partment of education, has for its aim: 

1. To keep a record of the students or alumni of the University 
who wish to teach, to gather information as to their academic and 
professional qualifications and personal fitness for school work, and 
to recommend for vacancies those who seem most likely to prove 
themselves efficient. 

2. To keep a similar record of alumni who wish to be transferred 
to other positions. 

3. To assist boards of education and other school officials in 
securing teachers, and co-operate with teachers' agencies in placing 
graduates of the University. 

Students desiring recommendation for positions as teachers should 
take at least twenty hours in education. Those desiring recommenda- 
tion for a position in a normal school or as principal or superintendent 
of schools should take at least thirty hours in education. 

No student is assured of a position. General letters of recom- 
mendation are not given to students. Information obtained from 
professors and others is regarded as confidential. No charge is made 
for any services rendered. Blanks for registration will be furnished 
on application. The following is the committee on recommendation: 
President Trotter, Professors Hill and Cavins, Assistant Professors 
Pollock and Stalnaker, and Professor Deahl, secretary. 

HIGH SCHOOL AND SUPERVISOR'S CERTIFICATES. 

Graduates from the University with not fewer than twenty semes- 
ter hours in education are recommended to the State Superintendent 
of 'Schools for high school and for supervisor's certificates accord- 
ing to the following regulations: 

1. No courses in education will be counted as part of the twenty 
hours unless approved by the Department of Education. 

2. Persons who have received advanced standing in education 
must do at least ten semester hours in regular college courses. These 
courses must not repeat those taken in/another school and they must 
be advanced work. 

3. Only a limited number of hours done in the summer school 
may be counted toward certification. 

4. Candidates for certification must demonstrate their fitness 
for recommendation by successful teaching in Education 44 or 48. 

'5. For the supervisor's certificate not fewer than five hours must 
be taken in administration and supervision. 



50 West Virginia University 

SCOPE OF THE ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS. 

The following description indicates the extent of preparation 
expected in each of the several subjects offered for entrance credit for 
admission to the various colleges of the University. 

ENGLISH. 

Grammar and Elementary English. No student will receive full 
entrance credit in English whose work shows marked deficiency in 
spelling, punctuation, grammar, sentence structure, or paragraphing. 
The student should be prepared to state intelligently the essential 
principles of English grammar and to explain the syntactical struc- 
ture of any sentence encountered in his reading. An elementary text- 
book or grammar should have been completed before the student 
enters upon his high school course. For more advanced study of the 
subject and for practical review, the material presented in the ordi- 
nary high school text-books on rhetoric may be utilized. The sub- 
ject should be constantly reviewed in connection with the work in 
composition during the four years in the high school course. 

Rhetoric and Composition. Systematic practice in theme writing 
and other forms of oral and written composition with instruction in 
the principles of rhetoric and the forms of discourse must form an 
important part of each unit of English. At least one theme weekly 
should be required throughout the course. Students who are not able 
to express themselves in clear, correct, and idiomatic English will 
not be given full credit. The subjects upon which the student writes 
should not be drawn exclusively from literature. A considerable por- 
tion of them should be so distributed as to give proper training in the 
various forms of discourse. 

Literature. In addition to the reading and study of English 
classics as outlined below, the student throughout his high school 
course should have opportunity to become familiar with the best 
magazines and newspapers and with the best current fiction and 
poetry. 

The four units in English should include the following: 

(a) One unit. English Classics and English Composition. The 
study of at least five English classics selected from the list below. 
The simplest narrative classics, both prose and poetry, should be 
selected. The aim of the work should be to stimulate interest in 
good literature and to enable the student to form vivid mental pic- 
tures and to understand fully the thought expressed. The aim of the 



The College of Arts and Sciences 51 

composition work should be to secure facility and accuracy. The 
work should include letter writing, short themes in narration and 
description, and study of paragraphing and sentence structure.* 

(ib) One unit. English Classics and English Composition, Study 
of several other English classics. The work should include more 
complex forms of fiction and narrative poetry, simpler essays, and 
at least one of Shakespeare's plays. 

(c) One unit. English Classics and English Composition. Read- 
ing and study of narrative and lyric poetry, of more difficult essays, 
and of several of Shakespeare's plays. In the work for both the 
second and third units the aim should be to make a study of form, 
structure, style, and purpose of the selection; the author's life; rela- 
tion of the selection to its age and to other works of similar type. 
For both units the work in composition should include themes of mod- 
erate length in all forms of discourse; study of unity, coherence, and 
emphasis in sentences and paragraphs; kinds of sentences; diction; 
figures of speech. 

(d) One unit. Advanced study of Classics; Rhetoric. A thor- 
ough and intensive study of the form, structure, and style, of at least 
one typical example of the novel, the drama, the lyric or epic poem, 
and the essay. A study of the principles of rhetoric employing some 
good advancved high school text-book, with frequent and systematic 
theme writing, must form a part of this unit. 

The following list of classics is suggested: 

I. Longfellow's Evangeline and Courtship of Miles Standish; 
Whittier's Snowbound; Lowell's Vision of Sir Launfal; Coleridge's 
Rime of the Ancient Mariner; Macaulay's Lays of Ancient Rome; 
Goldsmith's Deserted Village; Irving's Sketch Book; Hawthorne's 
Twice Told Tales; Franklin's Autobiography; Aldrich's Story of a Bad 
Boy; Warner's Being a Boy, A Hunting of the Deer, etc.; Burrough's 
Sharp Eyes, Birds and Bees, etc.; Dickens' Christmas Carol; Steven- 
son's Treasure Island. 

II. Stories from the Bible; Scott's Lady of the Lake, Marmion, 
Ivanhoe, Quentin Durward; George Eliot's Silas Marner; Goldsmith's 
Vicar of Wakefield; Mrs. Gaskell's Cranford; Cooper's Last of the 
Mohicans, The Spy, The Pilot; Blackmore's Lorna Doone; Dickens' 
Tale of Two Cities, David Copperfleld; Arnold's Sohrab and Rustum; 
Byron's Mazeppa and the Prisoner of Chillon; Shakespeare's Mer- 
chant of Venice, As You Like It, Julius Ceasar, Twelfth Night; Ad- 
dison's De Coverly Papers; Thoreau's Succession of Forest Trees; 



♦Reading of good literature outside of class and memorizing of notable passages 
in prose and verse should be required, but outside reading accompanied by written 
reports or reviews made according to a stereotyped model, in place of a thorough 
study of assigned lessons, class instruction and discusson, will not be coruidered as 
satisfactorily fulfilling the requirement of any unit. 



52 West Virginia University 

Stevenson's An Inland Voyage and Travels with a Donkey; Kipling's 
Captains Courageous. 

III. Page's Eed Rock; Churchill's Mr. Crewe's Career; Thomp- 
son's Alice of Old Vincennes; Norris' The Pit; Jackson's Ramona; 
Smith's Calelb West, Master Diver; Johnston's To Have and to Hold; 
Van Dyke's The 'Blue Flower and Other Stories; Mitchell's Hugh 
Wynne — Free Quaker. 

IV. Novels: Thackeray's Henry Eismond; George Eliot's iSilas 
Marner or Romola; Jane Austin's Pride and Prejudice; Hawthorne's 
The House of the Seven Gables. Dramas: iShakespeare's Macbeth, 
Lear, or Henry V. Poems: Tennyson's Idylls of the King; Milton's 
Shorter IPoems; Brownings Selected IPoems; Palgrave's Golden 
Treasury. Essays: Lamb's Essays of Elia; Emerson's Essays; Rus- 
kin's iSesame and Lilies; Carlyle's Heroes and Hero Worship; Essay 
on Burns; Macaulay's Essay on Addison and Life of Johnson; Wash- 
ington's Farewell Address; Webster's Bunker Hill Oration; Lincoln's 
Gettysburg Speech, etc. 

LATIN. 

(a) One unit. iSuch knowledge of inflection and syntax as is 
given in any good preparatory Latin Book, together with the ability 
to read easy selections from Caesar. 

(b) One unit. Four books from Caesar's Gallic War, or its 
equivalent in Latin of equal difficulty. The ability to write simple 
Latin based on the text. 

(c) One unit. Six orations of Cicero. The' ability to write 
simple Latin based on the text. The simpler historical references and 
the fundamental facts of Latin syntax. 

(d) One unit. Six books of Virgil, with history and mythology. 
Scansion of hexameter verse. Either (c) or (d) may be offered for 
the third unit, (but one year of composition must be included. 



GREEK. 

(a) One unit. Introductory lessons, elements of grammar; easy 
translations form the Anabasis: translation into Greek of easy con- 
tinuous prose Ibased upon the Anabasis. 

(b) One unit. Xenophon, the first four books of the Anabasis. 

(c) One unit. Homer, the first three books of the Iliad (omit- 
ting 11-492 to end) and the Homeric constructions, forms and prosody; 
constant practice in sight and prose composition. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 53 

GERMAN. 

(a) One unit. A thorough knowledge of elementary syntax; 
constant drill in pronunciation, oral translation, and composition; 
translation of seventy-five to one hundred pages; advanced syntax; 
composition throughout the year. 

(b) One unit. Modern prose and familiar poems, two hundred 
pages; advanced syntax; intermediate composition throughout the 
year. 

(c) One unit. Advanced prose, four hundred pages; advanced 
composition throughout the year. 

FRENCH. 

(a) One unit. (1) The essential principles of French etymology 
and syntax, and especially, a thorough knowledge of the pronoun and 
of the regular and irregular verb; (2) ability to write in French 
sentences of moderate difficulty; (3) the reading of from one hun- 
dred and fifty to two hundred pages of modern French prose; (4) 
ability to pronounce the language correctly and with some fluency. 

(b) One unit. (1) Twenty pages of advanced prose composition; 
(2) at least three hundred pages of modern French prose; (3) at 
least three hundred pages of modern French plays. 

HISTORY. 

From one to three units may be offered, selected from the fol- 
lowing: 

(a) Ancient History to 800 A. D. — one unit. 

(b) Mediaeval and Modern European History — one-half to one 
unit. The amount of credit will depend upon the time given to the 
subject. 

(c) English History — one-half to one unit. The amount of 
credit will depend upon the time given. 

(d) American History, or American History and Civics — one 
unit. 

The student should be familiar with the important events and 
should have a clear knowledge of the general development of the 

period of history which he offers for credit. 

A whole year that covers the whole field of general history with 



54 West Virginia University 

a good text-book and with notes on collateral reading and prepara- 
tion of maps will ibe accepted as one unit, although it is 'believed that 
better results will 'be obtained by spending a whole year on ancient 
history and another year on the mediaeval and modern period. 

American history and civics should be preceded by English his- 
tory, and should not be given before the third year in the high school 
course, in case three years are given to history. Ancient history 
.should be followed ;by English history in case mediaeval and modern 
history are not given. 

The study of civics must not precede the study of American 
history; and, if studied as a separate branch following the course in 
American history, some advanced text such as Forman's Advanced 
Civics should be used. An outline knowledge of elementary civics, 
such as presented in Forman's First Lessons in Civics, or in Peter- 
man's Civics, is presupposed. 

MATHEMATICS. 

(a) Algebra through quadratics — one unit. The four fundamen- 
tal operations for rational algebraic expressions; factoring, highest 
common factor, lowest common multiple, complex fractions, solution 
of equations of the first degree, radicals including the extraction of 
the square root of polynomials and numbers, fractional and negative 
exponents, quadratic equations, and equations containing one or more 
quadratic equations, and problems involving the use of such equations. 

(ib) Plane geometry — one unit. The completion of any standard 
text with original exercises and problems. 

(c) Algebra — one-half unit. Review of essentials followed by 
ratio and proportion, the ibinominal theorem for positive and integral 
exponents, arithmetical and geometrical progressions. 

(d) Solid geometry — one-half unit. Properties of straight lines 
and planes, dihedral and polyhedral angles, projections, polyhedrons, 
including prisms, pyramids, and the regular solids, cylinders, cones, 
and spheres, spherical triangles, measurements of surfaces and solids. 

(e) Plane trigonometry — one-half unit. Definitions and relations 
of the six trigonometrical functions as ratios, proofs of important 
formulae, theory of logarithms and use of tables, solutions of right 
and oblique plane triangles. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 55 

SCIENCE. 

(a) Physics — one unit. Credit will 'be given for one year's work 
with any standard text-book, upon the presentation of a satisfactory 
note-book, covering at least thirty-two experiments. The note book 
should contain the student's own record of his laboratory experiments 
and a signed statement from his teacher that the book is the original 
record of the student's observations. Students deficient in laboratory 
work may make up this deficiency in the University. 

(b) Chemistry — one unit. Credit will be allowed for the com- 
pletion in a satisfactory manner of any standard elementary text in 
inorganic chemistry, accompanied by individual laboratory work. A 
full year should be given to the work. 

(c) Botany — one unit. 

(d) Zoology — one unit. 

Work in either botany or zoology, to be credited, must have been 
accompanied by individual laboratory work. The exact extent of the 
work which should be done cannot be stated here, but, for the maxi- 
mum credit, it should be as much as a competent teacher, trained in 
laboratory methods can accomplish in from one to one and one-half 
years. In estimating the time employed, two hours of laboratory 
work will be counted as the equivalent of one recitation period. It 
will 'be necessary for applicants to present their laboratory notes and 
drawings. 

In botany the class should cover the ground of Coulter's "A Text 
Book in Botany," or Bergen's "Foundation of Botany," or their equiva- 
lent. 

In zoology the class work should cover about what is represented 
in Kellogg's "Elementary Zoology" (Henry Holt), or in Parker and 
Haskell's Zoology, one-volume edition (Macmillan & Co.). The 
amount of laboratory work that should be done is somewhat less 
than is outlined in Sheffer's manual (Blakiston). 

(e) Biology. A half year of botany and a half year of zoology 
each accompanied by individual laboratory work. 

(f) Physical Geography — one-half unit. 

(g) Physiology — one-half unit. 

Credit for one-half unit each in physical geography and physi- 
ology will be allowed — as elective only — if taught in a scientific man- 
ner in an accredited or recognized secondary school. The use of a 
standard text should be supplemented by proper illustrative methods 
and proper observation. One-half year must be given to each subject. 



56 West Virginia University 

A LIST OF CLASSIFIED HIGH SCHOOLS SCHOOL YEAR 1924-25 
High Schools of the First Class. 

Adamston, Clarksburg, Coal district, Harrison county. 
Alderson (conditioned), Alderson independent district, Monroe county. 
Ansted (conditioned), Mountain Cove district, Fayette county. 
Aurora, Union district, Preston county. 

Barrackville, Fairmont district, Marion county. 

tBeckley, Town district, Raleigh county. 

Belington, Belington independent district, Barbour county. 

Benwood, Union district, Marshall county. 

Berkeley Springs, -Bath district, Morgan county. 

Berwind, Big Creek district, McDowell county. 

Blacks ville (conditioned), Clay district, Monongalia county. 

Bluefield, Beaver Pond district, Mercer county. 

Bramwell, Rock district, Mercer county. 

Bridgeport, Bridgeport-iSimpson joint high school district, Harrison 

county. 
Bristol, Ten Mile district, Harrison county. 
Bruceton Mills, Grant district, Preston county. 
Buckhannon, Buckhannon independent district, Upshur county. 
Burch, Lee district, Mingo county. 
Burns ville, Salt Lick district, Braxton county. 

Cairo, Grant district, Ritchie county. 

Cameron, Cameron district, Marshall county. 

Charleston, Charleston independent district, Kanawha county. 

Charleston (negro), Garnett High School, Charleston independent dis- 
trict, Kanawha county. 

Charles Town, Charles Town district, Jefferson county. 

Chattaroy (conditioned), Lee district, 'Mingo county. 

Chester, Chester independent district, Hancock county. 

Clarksburg, Washington-Irving High School, Clarksburg independent 
district, Harrison county. 

Clarksburg (negro), Kelly Miller High School, Clarksburg indepen- 
dent district, Harrison county. 

Clay, Clay County High School. 

Clendenin, Big 'Sandy district, Kanawha county. 

Cowen, Glade district, Webster county. 

Davis, Davis district, Tucker county. 
Dunbar, Union district, Kanawha county. 

East Bank, Cabin Creek district, Kanawha county. 
Elizabeth, Elizabeth joint high school district, Wirt county. 
Elkhorn (negro), Elkhorn district, McDowell county. 
Elkins, Elkins independent district, Randolph county. 
Elk View (conditioned), Elk district, Kanawha county. 

Fairground, Clarksburg (conditioned), Clark district, Harrison county. 

Fairmont, Fairmont independent district, Marion county. 

Fairmont, East iSide High School, Union independent district, Marion 

county. 
Fairview, Paw Paw district, Marion county. 
Farmington, Lincoln district, Marion county. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 57 

Fayetteville, Fayetteville district, Fayette county. 
Follansbee, Cross Creek district, Brooke county. 
Frankford, Frankford district, Greenbrier county. 

Gap Mills, Sweet Springs district, Monroe county. 
Gary, Adkin district, McDowell county. 
Gassaway, Otter district, Braxton county. 
Grafton, Grafton independent district, Taylor county. 
Grantsville (conditioned), Calhoun County High School. 
Greenbank, Greenbank district, Pocahontas county. 
Greenville, Springfield district, Monroe county. 
Griffithsville, Duval district, Lincoln county. 

Hamlin, Carroll district, Lincoln county. 

Harpers Ferry, Harpers Ferry district, Jefferson county. 

Harrisville, Harrisville independent district, Ritchie county. 

Hedgesville, Hedgesville district, Berkeley county. 

Hillsboro, Little Levels district, Pocahontas county. 

Hinton, Hinton independent district, Summers county. 

Hundred, Church district, Wetzel county. 

Huntington, Huntington independent district, Cabell county. 

Huntington (negro), Douglass High School, Huntington independent 

district, Cabell county. 
Hurricane, Curry district, Putnam county. 

Iaeger, Sandy River district, McDowell county. 

Jacksonburg, Grant district, Wetzel county. 

Jane Lew, Jane Lew independent district, Lewis county. 

Kenova, Ceredo-Kenova independent district, Wayne county. 
Keyser, Keyser independent district, Mineral county. 
Kimball (negro), Browns Creek district, McDowell county. 
Kingwood, Kingwood district, Preston county. 

Lewisburg (conditioned), Lewisburg independent district, Greenbrier 

county. 
Littleton, Clay district, Wetzel county. 
Logan, Logan district, Logan county. 
Lost Creek, Grant district, Harrison county. 
Lumberport, Eagle district, Harrison county. 

Maiden, Maiden district, Kanawha county. 

Man, Triadelphia district, Logan county. 

Mannington, Mannington district, Marion county. 

Marlinton, Edray district, Pocahontas county. 

Martisburg, Martinsburg independent district, Berkeley county. 

Masontown, Valley district, Preston county. 

Matewan, Magnolia district, Mingo county. 

Matoaka, Rock district, Mercer county. 

Middlebourne, Tyler County High School. 

Mill Creek (conditioned second year), Huttonsville district, Randolph 

county. 
Milton, Grant district, Cabell county. 
Montgomery, Kanawha district, Fayette county. 
Montgomery (negro), Kanawha district, Fayette county. 
Moorefield (conditioned), Moorefield district, Hardy county. 
Morgantown, Morgantown independent district, Monongalia county. 



58 West Virginia University 

Moundsville, Moundsville independent district, Marshall county. 
Mount Hope, Fayetteville district, Fayette county. 
Mullens, Slab' Fork district, Wyoming county. 

Newburg, Lyon district, Preston county. 

New Cumberland, New Cumberland independent district, Hancock 

county. 
Newell, Grant district, Hancock county. 
New Martinsville, Magnolia district, Wetzel county. 
Nitro (conditioned), Nitro independent district, Kanawha county. 
Northfork, Northfork district. McDowell county. 
Northfork (negro) (conditioned), Northfork district, McDowell 

county. 

Oak Hill, Fayetteville district, Fayette county. 

Oak Park, Wheeling, Triadelphia district, Ohio county. 

Oxley (conditioned), 'Shady 'Springs district, Raleigh county. 

Parkersburg, Parkersburg independent district, Wood county. 
Parkersburg (negro), Sumner High School, Parkersburg independent 

district, Wood county. 
Parsons, Black Fork district, Tucker county. 
Paw Paw, Cacapon district, Morgan county. 
Pennsboro, Clay district, Ritchie county. 
Petersburg (conditioned), Petersburg independent district, Grant 

county. 
Philippi, Philippi independent district, Barbour county. 
Piedmont, Piedmont district, Mineral county. 
Pine Grove, Grant district, Wetzel county. 
Pineville (conditioned), Center district, Wyoming county. 
Point Pleasant, Point Pleasant independent district, Mason county. 
Princeton, East River district, Mercer county. 
Pullman, Union district, Ritchie county. 

Rainelle (conditioned), Meadow Bluff district, Greenbrier county. 

Ravenswood, Ravenswood independent district, Jackson county. 

Reader, Green district, Wetzel county. 

Renick, Falling Spring district, Greenbrier county. 

Richwood, Richwood independent district, Nicholas county. 

Ripley, Ripley independent district, Jackson county. 

Rivesville, Paw Paw district, Marion county. 

Romney, Romney district, Hampshire county. 

Ronceverte, Fort Spring district, Greenbrier county. 

Rowlesburg, Reno district, Preston county. 

Salem, Salem independent district, Harrison county. 

>Sand Fork, Glenville district, Gilmer county. 

Sardis, Sardis district, Harrison county. 

Sherrard, Union district, Marshall county. 

Shinnston, Clay district, Harrison county. 

Sistersville, Sistersville independent district, Tyler county. 

Smithfleld, Grant district, Wetzel county. 

Spanishburg (conditioned second year), Rock district, Mercer county. 

Spencer, Spencer independent district, Roane county. 

Stotesbury, Slab Fork district, Raleigh county. 

Summersville, Nicholas County High School. 

Sutton, Sutton independent district, Braxton county. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 59 

St. Albans, St. Albans independent district, Kanawha county. 
St. Marys, Washington district, Pleasants county. 
Switchback, Elkhorn district, McDowell county. 

Terra Alta, Portland district, Preston district. 
Thomas, Fairfax district, Tucker county. 
Tunnelton, Kingwood district, Preston county. 

Union, Union district, Monroe county. 

Wadestown, Battelle district, Monongalia county. 
Walkersville, Collins Settlement district, Lewis county. 
Wallace, Sardis district, Harrison county. 
Warwood, Wheeling, Richland district, Ohio county. 
Webster Springs, Fork Lick district, Webster county. 
Weirton, Butler district, Hancock county. 
Welch, Browns Creek district, McDowell county. 
Wellsburg, Wellsburg independent district, Brooke county. 
West Liberty, Liberty district, Ohio county, 
West Milford, Union district, Harrison county. 
West Monongah, Lincoln district, Marion county. 
Weston, Weston independent district, Lewis county. 
West Union, West Union independent district, Doddridge county. 
Wheeling, Wheeling independent district, Ohio county. 
Wheeling (negro), Lincoln High School, Wheeling independent dis- 
trict, Ohio county. 
White Sulphur Springs, White Sulphur district, Greenbrier county. 
Williamsburg, Williamsburg district, Greenbrier county. 
Williamson, Williamson independent district, Mingo county. 
Williamstown, Williams district, Wood county. 

High Schools of the Second Class. 

Albright, Portland district, Preston county. 
Athens, Plymouth district, Mercer county. 

Bancroft, Poca district, Putnam county. 

Bayard, Union district, Grant county. 

Beckley (negro), Town district, Raleigh county. 

Bethany, Buffalo district, Brooke county. 

Beverly, Beverly district, Randolph county. 

Bramwell (negro), Rock district, Mercer county. 

Buckhannon (negro), Buckhannon independent district, Upshur county. 

Bunker Hill, Mill Creek district, Berkeley county. 

Burchfield, Grant district, Wetzel county. 

Danville, Scott district, Boone county. 
Dunleith, Ceredo district, Wayne county. 

Eccles, Trap Hill district:, Raleigh county. 
Elk Garden, Elk district, Mineral county. 

Fairmont (negro), Dunbar High School, Fairmont independent dis- 
trict, Marion county. 
Fellowsville, Reno district, Preston county. 
Flatwoods, Flatwoods independent district, Braxton county. 
Flemington, Flemington district, Taylor county. 
Franklin, Franklin district, Pendleton county. 



60 West Virginia University 

Gary (negro), Adkin district, McDowell county. 

Gilbert, Stafford district, Mingo county. 

Great 'Cacapon, Cacapon district, Morgan county. 

Herndon, Barkers Ridge district, Wyoming county. 

Hinton (negro), Hinton independent district, Summers county. 

Kermit, Warfield district, Mingo county. 

Macdonald (negro), Fayetteville district, Fayette county. 
Mason, Mason independent district, Mason county. 

New Haven, Graham district, Mason county. 

Oceana, Oceana district, Wyoming county. 

Peterstown, Red Sulphur district, Monroe county. 

Shepherdstown, Shepherdstown district, Jefferson county. 
Simpson, Court House district, Taylor county. 
iSmoot, Meadow Bluff district, Greenbrier county. 

Tipple, Slab Fork district, Wyoming county. 

Walton, Walton district, Roane county. 
Wayne, Wayne County High iSchool. 
Winding Gulf, Slab Fork district, Raleigh county. 
Wyatt, Eagle district, Harrison county. 

High Schools of the Third Class. 

Bluefield (negro), Beaver Pond district, Mercer county. 

Daybrook, Clay district, Monongalia county. 

Excelsior (negro), Big 'Creek district, McDowell county. 

Friendly, Union district, Tyler county. 

Harman, Dry Fork district, Randolph county. 

Leetown, Middleway district, Jefferson county. 
Lenore, Hardee district, Mingo county. 
Lester, Trap Hill district, Raleigh county. 

Morgantown (negro), Morgantown independent district, Monongalia 
county. 

Sandyville, Ravenswood district, Jackson county. 

Wardensville, Wardensville district, Hardy county. 



Graduate Courses and Degrees 



The Committee on Graduate Work. 

MADISON STATHERS, Ph.D., Chairman, Professor of Romance 

Languages 
NAHUM JAMES GIDDINGS, Ph.D., Professor of Plant Pathology 
ALEXANDER HARDIE FORMAN, M.M.E., Ph.D., Professor of 

Electrical Engineering 
LAWRENCE BENJAMIN HILL, Ph.D., Secretary, Professor of 

Education 

THOMAS LUTHER HARRIS, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology 

Purpose of Graduate Work. 

Graduate study and teaching at West Virginia University is the 
most advanced work in education undertaken by the State. Its chief 
aim is the development of independent investigation and the stimu- 
lation or promotion of the spirit of research. 

GRADUATE DEGREES. 

The University does not confer the degree, Doctor of Philosophy, 
but will certify to other institutions such graduate work as may be 
applicable toward this degree. 

The University confers the following master's degrees: Master 
of Arts (A.M.), Master of Science (M.S.), Master of Science in Me- 
chanical Engineering (M.S.M.E.), Master of Science in Civil Engin- 
eering (M.S.C.E.), Master of Science in Electrical Engineering 
(M.S.E.E.), Master of Science in Engineering of Mines (.M.S.E.M.), 
Master of Science in Chemical Engineering (M.S.Chem.E.), and Mas- 
ter of Science in Agriculture (M.S.Agr.). A Master's degree is con- 
ferred upon the following conditions: 

Candidacy. 

1. Qualifications. A candidate for a master's degree must hold 
a bachelor's degree from West Virginia University or from another 
institution in which the requirements are substantially equivalent. 

Those who wish to become candidates but lack undergraduate 
preparation will be admitted to graduate study, but must at once 
make up their deficiencies by taking the necessary undergraduate 
courses. On completion of such undergraduate courses they become 
eligible to candidacy. 



62 West Virginia University 

Those who have received their 'bachelor's degree and wish to 
broaden their education without reference to a higher degree, will 'be 
admitted to graduate study without restriction as to courses. 

Seniors in the colleges of West Virginia University who have 
completed the work for the bachelor's degree but who have not yet 
received the degree may have work credited toward the master's 
degree at the discretion of the Committee on Graduate Work. 

2. Application for Admission. Students who desire to register 
for graduate courses leading to a master's degree should submit their 
applications for admission to candidacy for the degree to the Com- 
mittee on Graduate Work, either in person or iby letter some weeks 
prior to the opening of the semester in which they desire to register. 
Blank forms can be obtained on application. The application must 
be in the hands of the Committee at the time when the student pre- 
sents himself for registration in the courses which he desires to take 
for graduate credit and not later than October 1 in the college year in 
which he desires to have the degree conferred. 

In his application the student must announce his choice of a major 
subject and must submit a general outline of his proposed course of 
study. The major subject chosen must be either the same as the 
undergraduate major or one in which the candidate has an equivalent 
undergraduate preparation. However if he is defiicient in the major 
subject chosen he may be admitted as a graduate student and may 
complete undergraduate deficiencies in that subject. 

No student will 'be admitted to graduate study until properly 
certified credentials from his college or university are filed with the 
registrar and approved by the Graduate Committee. 

Class Officer. 

If the student is accepted as a candidate for the master's degree 
the Committee on Graduate Work will appoint a class officer to have 
general direction of the candidate's work in his major subject and in 
the related subjects. The class officer shall arrange a specific course 
of study to be approved by the Committee on Graduate Work and shall 
preside at the final examination in which he shall call to his aid as 
special examiners representatives from all departments in which the 
candidate has had work. 

Not later than February 20 in each year the class officer of each 
candidate for an advanced degree at the next following commence- 
ment must make a final recommendation to the Committee on Grad- 
uate Work containing a detailed statement of the approved courses 



Graduate Work 63 

with subject, number, hours of credit and grade in each course already 
completed and a schedule of work for the remainder of the year. No 
recommendation for advanced degrees will be considered by the Com- 
mittee after that date. 

Requirements for the Degree. 

1. Term of Residence. Time and facilities are recognized as two 
important essentials for bona fide graduate work. A candidate must 
pursue graduate courses for at least thirty-six weeks' after the com- 
pletion of the work for his undergraduate degree. Graduate credit is 
not given for work done in absentia, except in case of a thesis requir- 
ing research which can be conducted to advantage elsewhere. 

2. Course of Study. The candidate must do thirty-two hours of 
graduate work, which at the discretion of the department in which 
he has chosen his major subject may or may not include a thesis. 
At least ten hours, exclusive of thesis, shall be in the candidate's 
major subject; and any remaining hours shall be in subjects related 
thereto. Courses primarily designated for graduate students and dis- 
tinctly senior courses open to graduates, are indicated in the catalogue, 
but other advanced courses and special research courses not listed in 
the catalogue may be credited with the approval of the Committee on 
Graduate Work. In rare instances advanced undergraduate courses, 
not regularly open to graduates, may be approved for graduate work 
with reduced credit; but elementary courses are never credited. 

The rule of the Committee is to approve no course for graduate 
credit unless the catalogue specifically states that it is intended for 
graduate students. 

For courses submitted for graduate credit the passing grade is 
eighty percent and no grade reported below that figure may be changed 
by a second examination. 

Courses given during the college year will not be accepted for 
graduate credit in the Summer School unless they are given such 
credit in the annual catalogue. 

No work done before the completion of the work required for the 
bachelor's degree will be credited toward the master's degree unless 
the work and courses have been regularly approved by the Committee. 

The partial or complete course of study must be presented to the 
Committee on Graduate Work for its approval within two weeks after 
the acceptance of the student's application. 

Graduate courses completed before the filing of the schedule of 



64 West Virginia University 

graduate studies will ordinarily not be counted toward the graduate 
degree. 

NOTE — Since the principal aim of graduate study is scholarly 
development, the acquisition of knowledge necessary to do independent 
work, and the promotion of the spirit of research, each candidate for 
a degree is expected to have a wide knowledge of his subject and of 
related fields of work and to pursue a course of related reading and 
study in addition to his University work. 

3. Thesis.' The thesis shall show acceptable investigation in the 
major subject. It shall be prepared under the direction of the de- 
partment in which the student has chosen his major and shall be 
submitted for approval to the class officer at least four weeks previous 
to the commencement day at which the degree is expected. The thesis 
shall be presented in such form as may be prescribed by the Commit- 
tee on Graduate Work. If the thesis is approved, two typewritten 
or printed bound copies shall be. deposited in the University Library 
at least one week before the degree is conferred. The usual credit 
for a thesis is from three to seven hours. 

4. Final Examination. The final examination of the candidate 
shall be oral and shall cover the major and related courses and thesis, 
or such part thereof as the examiners may deem desirable. This ex- 
amination shall be open to the public and shall be held at least three 
weeks before the commencement day on which the degree is expected. 
The Committee on Graduate Work shall delegate one of its members 
to attend the examination. 

The class officer shall report his opinion of the thesis and the 
result of the examination of the candidate to the Committee on Grad- 
uate Work at least ten days before commencement. 

Professional Degrees in Engineering. 

The University confers the following professional degrees: Civil 
Engineer (C.E.), Mechanical Engineer (M.E.), Electrical Engineer 
(E.E.), and Engineer of Mines (E.M.), upon graduates of the College 
of Engineering of the West Virginia University on the basis of prac- 
tical experience and study in absentia, the presentation of a thesis 
and an oral final examination. 

To be eligible a candidate for a professional degree must have 
been in active practice of his profession for at least five years since 
receiving his first degree and must have been in responsible charge 
of important work for at least two years, and must be qualified to 
design as well as direct engineering work. 

Application for registration as a candidate for a degree should be 
made not later than the first day of October in the year in which the 
degree is expected. Detailed regulations and registration blanks may 
be obtained from the Dean of the College of Engineering. 



Graduate Work 65 

COURSES OPEN TO GRADUATE STUDENTS. 
COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES. 
BOTANY. 

Course Open to Advanced Undergraduates. 

111. Morphology and Phylogeny. (4 Hrs.). 

First semester; lectures T., Th., 9:00; laboratory, M., F., 2:00. 
Associate Professor Spangler. 313 0. H. 

112. Morphology and Phylogeny. (4 Hrs.). A continuation of 
Course 111. 

Second semester; lecture and laboratory periods as in Course 
111. Professor Spangler, 313 O. H. 

114. Microtechnique and Plant Histology. (2 Hrs.). 
Second semester; W., 2:00 and S. 8:00. Professor Strausbaugh 
and Associate Professor Spangler, 307 O. H. 

122. Advanced Plant Physiology. (5 Hrs.). Three lecture periods 
and two three-hour laboratory periods each week. 

Second semester; M., W., F., 11:00; M., W., 2:00. Mr. Rhine, 
313 O. H. 

132. Forest Ecology. (4 Hrs.). Prerequisite: Botany 21 or 
Botany 31. Laboratory work mainly field study. 

Second semester; T., Th., 9:00; laboratory hours to be ararnged. 
Professor Strausbaugh, 313 O. H. 

134. Experimental Ecology. (4 Hrs.). 

Second semester; T., Th., 10:00; T., Th., 2:00. Professor Straus- 
baugh, 313 O. H. 

151. History of Botany. (2 Hrs.). 

First semester; M., F., 10.00. Professor Strausbaugh, 313 O. H. 

153. Botany Seminar. (1 Hr.). 

First semester; M., 4:00. Professor Strausbaugh and staff, 313 
O. H. 

154. Botany Seminar. (1 Hr.). 

Second semester; M., 4:00. Professor Strausbaugh and staff. 
313 O. H. 



66 West Virginia University 

Courses Open to Graduates Only. 

165. Morphological Studies. (4 Hrs.). 

First semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Strausbaugh 
and Associate Professor Spangler. 309 0. H. 

166. Morphological Studies. (4 Hrs.). 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Strausbaugh 
and Associate Professor Spangler, 309 O. H. 

171. Problems in Plant Pathology. (1-5 Hrs.). 

First semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Strausbaugh 
and Mr. Rhine, 307 O. H. 

172. Problems in Plant Pathology. (1-5 Hrs.). 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Strausbaugh 
and Mr. Rhine, 307 O. H. 

173. Microehemistry of Plant Tissues. (4 Hrs.). 

First semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Strausbaugh 
and Mr. Rhine, 307 O. H. 

181. Problems in Plant Ecology. (4 Hrs.). 

First semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Strausbaugh, 
313 O. H. 

182. Problems in Plant Ecology. (4 Hrs.). 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Strausbaugh, 
313 O. H. 

191. Research. (1-5 Hrs.). 

First semester; hours to be arranged. Botany staff, 307 O. H. 

192. Research. (1-5 Hrs.) 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. Botany staff, 307 O. H. 

CHEMISTRY. 
Courses Open Also to Advanced Undergraduates. 

107. Quantitative Analysis. (2 to 4 Hrs.) Prerequisites: course 
6 Physics 1, 2, 3, and 4, Mathematics 26 and 26. Four three-hour 
laboratory periods weekly. 

First semester; M., T., Th., F., 2:00. Professor Jacobson, 35 S. 

108. Quantitative Analysis. (2 to 5 Hrs.) Prerequisite: course 
107. Five three-hour laboratory periods weekly. 

Second semester; 2:00. Professor Jacobson, 35 S. 



Graduate Work 67 

111. Synthetic Inorganic Chemistry. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisite: 

course 7. One lecture and two three-hour laboratory periods. (11). 

First semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Morris, 35 S. 

113. Quantitative Analysis. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisites: courses 7 
and 20. One lecture and two three-hour laboratory periods weekly. 
(3). 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Morris, 35 S. 

114. Organic Quantitative Analysis. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisite: 
course 33. Two three-hour laboratory periods weekly. (14). 

Second semester; M., F., 2-5. Professor Jacobson, 35 S. 

116. Organic Quantitative Analysis. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisite or 
parallel course: course 20. Two three-hour laboratory periods week- 
ly. (23). 

Second semester. Associate Professor Smithey and Mr. Gar- 
land, 31 S. 

122. Food Analysis. (3 Hrs.) Primarily for agricultural and 
home economics students. One lecture and two three-hour laboratory 
periods weekly. 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. 

133. Organic Chemistry. (5 Hrs.) This course may be counted 
as graduate work for students in other colleges who have done a pro- 
portionate amount of work in other branches of chemistry. Prerequi- 
site: course 7; for mining engineering students, course 6. Three lec- 
tures and two three-hour laboratory periods weekly. (9). 

First semester; M., W., F., 11:00; T., Th., 2:00; Professor 
Clark, Associate Professor Smithey, and Mr. Garland, 16 M. H. 
and 33 S. 

138. Organic Chemistry. (5 Hrs.) Prerequisite: course 33. Two 
lectures and three three-hour laboratory periods weekly. (20). 

Second semester; T., Th., 11:00; M. W. F., 2:00-5:00. Professor 
Clark, Associate Professor Smithey, and Mr. Garland, 11 and 33 S. 

139. Dyes and Dye Intermediates. (2 or 4 Hrs.). Prerequisite: 
course 38. (24). 

First semester; T., Th., 9:00; laboratory, T., Th., 2:00-5:00. 
Professor Clark, US. 

140. Dyes and Dye Intermediates. (2 or 4 Hrs.) Prerequisite: 
course 39. (25). 

Second semester; T., Th., 9:00; laboratory, T., Th., 2:00-5:00. 
Professor Clark, US. 



68 West Virginia University 

151. Industrial Chemistry. (2 Hrs.). (19). 

First semester; M., F., 9:00. Professor Clark, 11 S. 

152. Industrial Chemistry. (2 or 4 Hrs.). (22). 
Second semester; W. F., 9:00. Professor Clark, 11 S. 

160. Physical Chemistry. (5 Hrs.) Prerequisites: Chemistry 
33 and Physics 4. Three lectures and two three-hour laboratory per- 
iods weekly. (21). 

Second semester; M., W., F., 9:00; T., Th., 2:00-5:00. Associate 
Professor Davies, 1 S. 

162. Chemistry of Colloids. (2 or 4 Hrs.) Two lectures and two 
three-hour laboratory periods weekly. (26). 

Second semester; T., Th., 8:00; M., F., 2:00-5:00. Associate 
Professor Davies, 1 S. - 

174. History of Chemistry. ..(2 Hrs.). 

Second semester; T., Th., 9:00. Associate Professor Hill. 

Courses Open to Graduates Only. 

183. Physical Chemistry. (5 Hrs.). An elective course for 
graduate students; seniors 'by consent. Prerequisite: Chemistry 160. 

First semester; hours to be arranged. Associate Professor 
Davies. 1 S. 

185, 186, 187, 188. Research. (Credits as arranged; not to exceed 
five hours each semester.) (28). 

Both semesters; hours to be arranged. Chemistry staff. 

189, 190, 191, 192. Journal Meeting and Seminar. (1 Hr.) (30.) 

Both semesters; M., 8:00. Professor Clark and stoff. 

196. Electro Chemistry. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisites: Courses 7, 
138, 160, and Physics 3. One lecture and two three-hour laboratory 
periods weekly. 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. 

198. Qualitative Analysis. (2 Hrs.) 

Second semester; T., Th., 9:00-12:00. Associate Professor 
Hill, 37 S. 



Graduate Work 69 

ECONOMICS. 
Courses Open Also to Advanced Undergraduates. 

111. Money, Credit and Banking. (3 Hrs.) For graduates as 
a minor. Prerequisites: Economics 1 and 2. 

First semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Professor Vickers, 27 W. 

112. Public Finance. (4 Hrs.) For graduates as a minor. Pre- 
requisites: Economics 1 and 2. 

Second semester; M., T., Th., P., 10:00. Professor Vickers, 27 W. 

113. Business Organization. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisites: Eco- 
nomics 1 and 2. 

First semester; T., Th., S., 9:00. Professor Rufener, 42 W. 

114. Business Finance. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisite: Economics 11. 
Second semester; T., Th., 9:00. Professor Rufener, 27 W. 

115. Investment and Speculation. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisites: Eco- 
nomics 11, 13 and 14. 

First semester ;*T., Th., 11:00. Professor Rufener, 42 W. 

136 Business Forecasting. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisites: Economics 
11, 13 and 31. 

Second semester; T., Th., 2:00. Professor Rufener, 42 W. 

140. Labor Problems. (3 Hrs.) By consent. Prerequisites: 
Economics 1 and 2 and consent of instructor. 

Second semester; M., W., F., 11:00. Professor Vickers, 42 W. 

141. Railroad Transportation. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisites: Eco- 
nomics 1 and 2. 

First semester; M., W., F., 8:00. Professor Rufener, 44 W. 

145. International Trade Policies. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisites: Eco- 
nomics 1 and 2. 

First semester; M., W., F., 11:00. Mr. Fields. 

146. Foreign Trade Methods. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisites: Eco- 
nomics 45. 

Second semester; T., Th., S., 8:00. Mr. Fields. 

147. Economic Development. (3 Hrs.) Special reference to the 
U. S. Prerequisites: Economics 1 and 2. 

First semester; T., Th., S., 10:00. Mr. Fields. 



70 West Virginia University 

151. History of Economic Doctrines. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisites: 
Economics 1 and 2 and consent of instructor. 

First semester; T., Th., 9:00. Professor Vickers, 28 W. 

152. Relations of Government to Economic Enterprises. (2 Hrs.) 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

Second semester; T., Th., 9:00. Professor Vickers, 42 W. 

154. Economic Principles in Practice. (2 Hrs.) A problem 
course conducted by the case method. Prerequisites: Economics 11 
and 13 and two other advanced courses in economics. 

Second semester; M., F., 10:00. Professor Rufener, 28 W. 

155. Distribution of Wealth. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisites: Economics 
51 and at least two other advanced courses. 

First semester, T., Th., 8:00. Professor Vickers, 28 W. 

156. iSeminar. Special problems in Economics. For seniors 
and graduates. Prerequisites: At least three advanced courses in 
Economics. Credit 2 to 4 hours. 

Second- semester; T., Th., 9:00. Professor Vickers, 28 W. 

Sociology. 
Courses Open Also to Advanced Undergraduates. 

131. Race Problems. ( 2 Hrs.) Prerequisites: Sociology 1 and 
consent of instructor. 

First semester; T., Th., 9:00. Professor Harris. 

133. Crime and Punishment. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisites: Sociology 
1 and consent of instructor. 

First semester; T., Th., 10:00. Assistant Professor Saposnekow. 

141. Social Organization. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisites: Sociology 
1 and 2. 

First semester; M., W., F., 8:00. Professor Harris. 

142. Theories of Social Progress. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisites: So- 
ciology 1 and 2. 

Second semester; M., W., F., 8:00. Professor Harris. 

144. iSocial Investigation. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisites: Eight hours 
of sociology and three hours of economics. 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Harris. 



Graduate Work 71 

146. History of Social Thought. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisites: Eight 
hours of sociology and six 'hours of economics. 

Second semester; M., F., 10:00. Assistant Professor Saposnekow. 

147. Seminar. (1 Hr.) A critical study of the current litera- 
ture of sociology. Prerequisites: nine hours of sociology and three 
hours of economics. 

• First semester; Th., 4:00. Professor Harris. 

148. Seminar. (1 Hr.) Continuation of Course 147. Prerequi- 
site: Sociology 47. 

Second semester; Th., 4:00. Professor Harris. 

EDUCATION. 

Course Open Also to Advanced Undergraduates. 

125. Educational Psychology. (3 Hrs.) 

First semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Professor Hill, 17 W. 

127. Experimental Education. (3 Hrs.) 

First semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Professor Cavins, 16 W. 

130. Statistical Methods Applied to Education. (3 Hrs.) 
Second semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Professor Cavins, 16 W. 

132. Tests and Measurements of General Intelligence. (2 to 4 
Hrs.) 

Second semester; T., Th., 4:00. Professor Deahl, 18 W. 

134. Problems in Secondary Education. (2 Hrs.) 
Second semester; T., Th., 8:00. Professor Roberts. 

137. Secondary School Program of Studies. (3 Hrs.) 
Semester and hours to be arranged. Professor Roberts. 

141. Teaching of English in the Secondary Schools. (2 Hrs.) 
Second semester; T., Th., 9:00. Assistant Professor . 

144. Principles of Teaching. (3 Hrs.) 

First semester; sections, M., W., F., 8:00 and 9:00. 

Second semester; sections, M., W., F., 8:00 and 11:00. Associate 

Professors Humphreys and Assistant Professor Pollock, 18 W and 

17 W. 

148. Directed Teaching. (3 Hrs.) 

First and second semesters; T., Th., 11:00. Staff; 2:00 to 4:00. 



72 West Virginia University 

150. Seminar in Directed Teaching. (1-3 Hrs.) 

First or second semester; hours to be arranged. Staff. 

155. Supervision of Learning and Teaching. (3 Hrs.) 
First semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Professor Deahl, 18 W. 

160. Seminar in Supervision of Instruction. (3 Hrs.) 
Second semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Professor Deahl, 18 W. 

163. School Administration and Supervision. (2 Hrs.) 
First semester; T., Th., 2:00. Professor Deahl, 18 W. 

164. School Administration and (Supervision. (2 Hrs.) 
Second semester; T., Th., 4:00. Professor Roberts, 16 W. 

168. Supervision of Rural Schools. (2 or 3 Hrs.) 
Second semester; T., Th., 2:00. Professor Hill, 17 W. 

170. Seminar in Educational Psychology. (2 or 3 Hrs.) 
Second semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Cavins. 

174. Psychology of Reading. (2 Hrs.) 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Cavins. 

176. Seminar in Educational Sociology. (3 Hrs.) 
Second semester; T., Th., 2:00. Professor Deahl, 18 W. 

177. Mental and Physical Measures and Tests. (2 to 4 Hrs.) 
First semester; T., Th., 4:00. Professor Deahl, 18 W. 

178. Construction and Use of Standard Tests. (2 Hrs.) 
Second semester; T., Th., 10:00. Professor Cavins, 16 W. 

182. History of Education. (2 Hrs.) 

Second semester; T., Th., 8:00. Associate Professor Hum- 
phreys, 17 W. 

183. Seminar in Domestic and Foreign School Systems. (2 Hrs.) 
Second semester; T., Th., 11:00. Professor Hill, 17 W. 

186. Seminar in Normal School Problems. (2 Hrs.) 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Hill, 17 W. 



Graduate Work 73 

188. Public School Programs of Studies. (3 Hrs.) 
Second semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Professor . 



191. School Curricula. Seminar. (2 or 4 Hrs.) 
First and second semesters; hours to be arranged. Professor 
Hill, 18 W. 

195. Educational Surveys. (2 Hrs.) 
First semester; T., Th., 9:00. Professor Cavins. 

ENGLISH. 

Courses Open Also to Advanced Undergraduates. 

121. Advanced Composition. (2 Hrs.) The course is intended 
for a limited number of students who desire to take up some par- 
ticular topic or problem in advance composition or who wish per- 
sonal criticism and direction in the preparation of theses or papers 
in connection with other courses. Students must consult the instructor 
before registering for the course. 

First semester; M., F., 10:00. Professor Johnson, 24 W. 

123. English Prose Style. (2 Hrs.) For seniors and graduate 
students. The work will be varied to suit the needs of the students 
who desire the course. Prerequisite: 

First semester; M., F., 10:00. Professor Johnson, 24 W. 

131. Old English. (3 Hrs.) The essentials of Anglo-Saxon 
grammar; translations. 

First semester; M., W., F., sections at 8:00 and 11:00. Pro- 
fessor Cox, 32 W. 

132. Old English — Beowulf. (3 Hrs.) For graduates who have 
had English 131. 

Second semester; M., W., F., 8:00. Professor Cox, 32 W. 

133. Early Middle English. (2 Hrs.) For graduates who have 
had English 131. Reading of early middle English texts. 

First semester; T., Th., 8:00. Professor Cox, 32 W. 

134. Chaucer. (3 Hrs.) The Canterbury Tales. 
Second semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Professor Cox, 32 W. 

135. Shakespeare. (3 Hrs.) A critical reading of Hamlet, 
Henry IV, Part I, and Henry V. 

First semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Professor Cox, 32 W. 



74 West Virginia University 

142. Shakespeare. (3 Hrs.) Several plays are read with at- 
tention to characters, plot development, and general literary inter- 
pretation. 

Second semester; M., W., F., 8:00. Professor Armstrong, 31 W. 

145. Milton. (2 Hrs.) A study of Milton's poems and the 
Areopagitica. 

Second semester; T., Th., 11:00. Professor Cox, 32 W. 

149. English Literature. (2 Hrs.) From the publication of 
the Lyrical Ballads to the death of .Scott. ( 1798-1832.) 

First semester; T., Th., 11:00. Professor Armstrong, 31 W. 

152. English Literature. (2 Hrs.) A study of the chief prose 
writers of the nineteenth century exclusive of fiction. (Omitted in 
1925-26.) 

First semester; T., Th., 11:00. Professor Armstrong, 31 W. 

155. Tennyson. (2 Hrs.) 'Special attention is paid to the origin 
of the Arthurian legends. (Omitted in 1925-26.) 

First semester; T., Th., 11:00. Professor Cox, 32 W. 

158. Rudyard Kipling. (3 Hrs.) For juniors, seniors and gradu- 
ates. 

Second semester; M., W., F., 11:00. Professor Cox, 32 W. 

162. The Modern Drama. (3 Hrs.) For juniors, seniors and 
graduates. Besides the English and American plays studied, a few 
foreign plays in translation will be considered. 

Second semester; M., W., F., 11:00. Professor Cox, 32 W. 

172. The Ballad. (2 Hrs.) A study of the popular English and 
Scottish ballads with a special consideration of types found in West 
Virginia. 

Second semester; T., Th., 11:00. Professor Cox, 32 W. 

173. A Study of Poetry. (2 Hrs.) English poetry; types, 
forms, meters and other essential qualities. 

Second semester; T., Th., 11:00. Professor Barbe, 33 W. 

176. The Novel. (3 Hrs.) Various types of the novel are 
studied in order to show its development and relation to life. 

Second semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Professor Johnson, 24 W.. 

177. The Essay. (3 Hrs.) Preparation of a semester paper is 
part of the work of the course. 

First semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Professor Johnson, 24 W. 



Graduate Work 75 

184. English Literature. (2 Hrs.) Study of an author. The 
entire production or the most important work of some author is 
studied to gain a complete view. Prerequisite: At least four hours 
of advanced English. In 1926 Ruskin will be studied. 

Second semester; T., Th., 8:00. Professor Armstrong, 31 W. 

GEOLOGY. 

113. Oil and Gas Geology. (2 or 3 Hrs.) Prerequisites: Geology 
32, trigonometry, college chemistry and physics. 

First semester; T., Th., 8:00 and a third hour to be arranged. 
Professor Scheffel, 111 M. H. 

162. Field Geology. (3 Hrs.) Open to graduates as a minor. 
Prerequisites: Geology and surveying. 

Second semester; Th., 11:00; S., 8:00-12:00. Associate Pro- 
fessor Scheffel, 112 M. H. 

166. Advanced Field Geology. (3 to 5 Hrs.) Open only to gradu- 
ates. Special geologic problems to be worked out by the student. 
Students interested must consult the instructor before registering. 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. Associate Professor 
Scheffel, 112 M. H. 

171, 172. Field Geology on Distant Areas. (1 to 3 Hrs.) Pre- 
requisites: Geology 81 and 32. 

First and second semester; hours to be arranged. Professor 
Tilton, 112 M. H. 

181. Historical Geology (Paleontology) Laboratory. (1 Hr.) 
Open to graduate students as a minor only. 

First semester; M., 2:00-5:00. Professor Tilton, 111 M. H. 

182. Historical Geology (Paleontology) Laboratory. (1 Hr.) 
Open to graduate students as a minor only. A continuation of Course 
81. 

Second semester; T., 2:00-5:00. Professor Tilton, 111 M. H. 

183. 184. Stratigraphic Paleontology. (1 Hr.) A study of the 
characteristic fossils used in the identification of strata. Prerequi- 
site: Course 81. 

Either semester; F., 1:00-4:00. Professor Tilton, 111 M. H. 

187. Petrography. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisite: Geology 31; prefera- 
bly additional knowledge of mineralogy and of light. 

First semester; T., Th., 9:00; laboratory hours to be arranged. 
Professor Tilton, 112 M. H. 



76 West Virginia University 

191, 192. Geologic Readings, Seminar Plan. (1 Hr. each semes- 
ter.) Prerequisite: Course 3. 

Both semesters; hour to be arranged. Professor Tilton. 

GERMAN. 

Courses Open Also to Advanced Undergraduates. 

141. Faust. Part I. (2 Hrs.) Open also to qualified under- 
graduates. 

First semester; T., Th., 2:00. Professor Porterfield, 25 W. 

142. Faust. Part II. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisite: Course 101. 
Second semester; T., Th., 2:00. Professor Porterfield, 25 W. 

Courses Open to Graduate Students Only. 

145. History of German Literature. 1796-1870. (2 Hrs.) Given 
in 1926-27. 

First semester; T., Th., 10:00. Professor Porterfield, 25 W. 

146. History of German Literature. 1870-1914. (2 Hrs.) Con- 
tinuation of Course 145. Given in 19:26-27. 

Second semester; T., Th., 10:00. Professor Porterfield, 25 W. 

147. German-iSwiss Literature. (2 Hrs.) Intensive study of the 
modern Swiss novel from Gottfried Keller to the present. Given in 
1926-27. 

First semester; T., Th., 3:00. Assistant Professor Michel, 20 W. 

148. German-Swiss Literature. (2 Hrs.) Continuation of Course 
III. Given in 1926-27. 

Second semester; T., Th., 3:00. Assistant Professor Michel, 
20 W. 

HISTORY. 
Courses Open Also to Advanced Undergraduates. 

114. Renaissance and Reformation. (3 Hrs.) 

Second semester; M., W., F., 11:00. Assistant Professor Mit- 
chell, 43 W. 

115. Contemporary Europe. 1870-1921. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisite: 
A knowledge of the outline facts of European history from 1815 to 
1870. Omitted in 1925-26. 

First semester; M., W., F., 11:00. Professor Chitwood, 41 W. 



Graduate Work 77 

116. Seminar in European History. (2 Hrs.) Open to seniors 
with the consent of the instructor. Omitted 1925-26. 

First semester. Professor Chitwood, 41 W. 

117. Seminar in Modern European History. (2 Hrs.) 
Second semester; T., Th., 10:00. Assistant Professor Mitchell, 

43 W. 

118. The Causes of the World War. (2 Hrs.) Open to seniors 
with the consent of the instructor. Omitted in 1925-26. 

Second semester. Professor Chitwood, 41 W. 

132. History of Canada. (2 Hrs.) Primarily for juniors and 
seniors who have had History 27 and 28 but open to graduates. 

Second semester; T., Th., 11:00. Professor Shortridge, 20 L. 

133. The Puritan Revolution. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisites: History 
27 and 28. 

Second semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Professor Shortridge, 20 L. 

136. English Constitutional History and law. (2 Hrs.) Pre- 
requisite: History 27 and 28. 

137. Seminar in English and Canadian History. (2 Hrs.) 
First semester; T., Th., 9:00. Professor Shortridge, 20 L. 

137. Seminar in English and Canadian History. (2 Hrs.) 
Second semester; T., Th., 9:00. Professor Shortridge, 20 L. 

158. Reconstruction and Later American History. 1864-1924. 
(3 Hrs.) Primarily for seniors who major in history but open to other 
seniors and graduates on approval. 

Second semester; M., F., 10:00 and third hour to be arranged. 
Professor Ambler, 45 W. 

159. The Trans-Allegheny Frontier. (2 Hrs.) 

First semester; T., Th., 8:00. Professor Ambler, 45 W. 

160. History of American Diplomacy and Foreign Policy. 1776- 
1920. (2 Hrs.) Open to seniors and graduates who have credit for 
History 52, 53 or 55. 

First semester; T., Th., 9:00. Professor Callahan, 20 L. 

161. Latin-American History. (2 Hrs.) Primarily for seniors 
but open to graduates. Omitted 1925-26. 

Second semester; T., Th., 9:00. Professor Callahan, 21 L. 



78 West Virginia University 

162. The American Revolution and the Making of the Constitu- 
tion. (2 Hrs.) 

Second semester; T., Th., 8:00. Professor Ambler, 45 W. 

163. Anglo-American Diplomatic Relations. (2 Hrs.) For sen- 
iors and graduates who have had college courses in American political 
or constitutional history or History 160. Omitted 1925-26. 

First semester; T., Th., 9:00. Professor Callahan, 20 L 

164. American Relations With Latin America. (2 Hrs.) For 
seniors and graduates who have had college courses in American 
political history. 

Second semester; T., Th., 11:00. Professor Callahan, 20 L. 

165. Special American Diplomatic Problems. (2 Hrs.) Primarily 
for history majors, seniors and graduates whose previous credit in- 
clude History 52 or 53 and 160. Omitted 1925-26. 

Second semester; T., Th., 3:00. Professor Callahan, 20 L. 

166. American Expansion Policy. (2 Hrs.) For graduate stu- 
dents. 

First semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Callahan. 

167. History of the South. (2 Hrs.) For seniors and graduates. 
Omitted 1925-26. 

Professor Ambler, 45 W. 

168. The Jacksonian Era. (2 Hrs.) For graduates. 

Second semester; M., F., 10:00. Professor Chitwood, 41 W. 

170. iSeminar. (2 Hrs.) Primarily for graduates and History 
majors who are preparing theses. Methods of historical research, 
construction and interpretation. 

First and second semesters; 3:00. Professor Callahan, 22 L. 



Graduate Work 79 

Political Science. 

115. American Practical Politics: Government at Work. (2 Hrs.) 

Open to seniors and graduates. 

First semester; M., F., 10:00. Professor Callahan, 20 L. 

116. European History and Practical Politics. (2 Hrs.) Pri- 
marily for seniors who have had history and open to graduates as a 
minor. 

First semester; T., Th., 10:00. Assistant Professor Mitchell, 
43 W. 

118. State and Local Administration. (2 Hrs.) For seniors and 
graduates. Second semester. (Omitted 1925-26). 

Professor Ambler. 

119. Historical Political Theories. (2 Hrs.) (Omitted 1925-26). 
Professor Ambler. 

120. American Political Theories. (2 Hrs.) (Omitted 1925-26). 
Professor Ambler. 

123. International Law and Practice of Diplomacy. (2 Hrs.) 
Open to seniors and graduates with prerequisite courses in modern 
history. 

Second semester; T., Th., 9:00. Professor Callahan, 20 L. 

160. American Diplomacy and Foreign Policy. (See History 160). 

LATIN. 

Courses Open Also to Advanced Undergraduates. 

131. Horace's Satires and Epistles. (4 Hrs.) 

First semester; M., T., Th., F., 10:00. Professor Cannaday, 
29 W. 

132. Roman Life and Customs. (4 Hrs.) The basis for study is 
selected readings from the letters of Cicero and Pliny and the satires 
of Juvenal. 

Second semester; M., T., Th., F., 10:00. Professor Cannaday, 
29 W. 



80 West Virginia University 

MATHEMATICS. 
Courses Open Also to Advanced Undergraduates. 

140. Differential Equations. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisites: Courses 6, 
7, or 8, 9. 

Second semester; M., W., F., 1:00. Professor Eiesland, 300 M. H. 

141. Theory of Determinants and Analytic Geometry of Space. 

(2 Hrs.) Prerequisites: Courses 6, 7, or 8, 9. 

First semester; T., Th., 3:00. Assistant Professor Turner, 114 
M. H. 

142. Advanced Topics in Calculus. (2 Hrs.) 

Second semester; T., Th., 3:00. Assistant Professor Buchanan, 
205, M. H. 

143. Projective Geometry. (3 Hrs.) 

Second semester; M., W., F., 3:00. Assistant Professor Turner, 
114 M. H. 

151. Descriptive Astronomy. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisites: Courses 
6, 7 or 8, 9. 

Second semester; M., W., F., 3:00. Professor Eiesland, 3:00 
M. H. 

152. Practical Astronomy. (1 Hr.) Sextant work and work 
with a portable transit. 

Second semester; T., 1:00. Professor Eiesland. 

Courses Open to Graduates Only. 

180. Higher Plane Curves with Special Reference to Curves of 
the Third and Fourth Order. (3 Hrs.) 

First semester; M., W., F., 4:00. Assistant Professor Turner. 

181. Higher Plane Curves. Continuation of course 180. 

Second semester; M., W., F., 4:00. Assistant Professor Turner. 

182. Introduction to the Theory of Functions of a Com pies 
Variable. (3 Hrs.) 

First semester; M., W., F., 4:00. Assistant Professor Buchanan. 

183. Introduction to the Theory of Functions of a Complex 
Variable. (3 Hrs.) Continuation of course 182. 

Second semester; M., W., F., 4:00. Assistant Professor Buch- 
anan. 



Graduate Work 81 

184. Differential Geometry and Theory of Surfaces. (3 Hrs.) 
Second semester; M., W., F., 3:00. Professor Eiesland. 

185. Differential Geometry and Theory of Surfaces. (3 Hrs.) 
Second semester; M., W., F., 3:00. Professor Eiesland. 

186. Introduction to the Theory of Integral Equations. (3 Hrs.) 
First semester; hours to be arranged. Assistant Professor Rey- 
nolds. 

187. Introduction to the Theory of Integral Equations. (3 Hrs.) 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. Assistant Professor 
Reynolds. 

188. Mathematical Seminar. (2 Hrs.) 

First semester; hours to be arranged. Assistant Professor Buch- 
anan. 

189. Mathematical Seminar. (2 Hrs.) 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. Assistant Professor 
Reynolds. 

190. Vector Analysis. (3 Hrs.) 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Eiesland. 

191. Linear and Quadratic Line Complexes. (3 Hrs.) Methods 
of Plucker, Klein and Lie. Prerequisites: Courses 184 and 185. 
Omitted 1924-25. 

First semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Eiesland. 

192. Linear and Quadratic Line Complexes. Continuation of 
Course 191. Omitted 1924-25. 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Eiesland. 

193. Algebraic Geometry and Theory of Abelian Integrals. (3 

Hrs.) 

First semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Eiesland. 

194. Algebraic Geometry and Abelian Integrals. (3 Hrs.) 
Second semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Eiesland. 



82 West Virginia University 

PHILOSOPHY AND PSYCHOLOGY. 
Courses Open Also to Advanced Undergraduates. 

113. Modern Thought. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisites: Psychology 1, 
Philosophy 15, and Philosophy 2. 

Second semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Professor Cunningham, 36 L. 

114. Contemporary Thought. (2 Hrs.) The idealistic, the real- 
istic, and the pragmatic types of thought are considered. Consid- 
erable knowledge of mathematics, physics, and biology desirable. 
Prerequisites: Psychology 1, Philosophy 15 and either Philosophy 2, 
7 or 8. 

First semester; M., F., 10:00. Professor Cunningham, 36 L. 

117. Metaphysics. (2 Hrs.) A critical study of a selected sys- 
tem of thought. Prerequisites: Psychology 1, Philosophy 2, Philoso- 
phy 15, and one course from Philosophy 7, 8 and 9. 

Second semester; T., Th., 2:00. Professor Cunningham, 36 L. 

130. Advanced Psychology. (3 Hrs.) A critical constructive 
study of systematic psychology. Prerequisites: Courses 1 and 12. 
Second semester; M., W., F., 11:00. Professor Winter, 33 L. 

140. History of Psychology. (2 Hrs.) A survey of the develop- 
ment of psychological theory with special emphasis upon modern 
psychological problems. Prerequisites: Course 1 in psychology and 
courses 7 and 8 in philosophy. 

First semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Winter, 33 L. 



Graduate Work 83 

PHYSICS. 

Courses Open Also to Advanced Undergraduates. 

121. Light. (3 Hrs.) Same as Course 21. Counted for grad- 
uate credit for students whose major is physics. 
Professor Molby. 

124. Radio-Telegraphy and Radio-Telephony. (4 Hrs.) 
Professor Colwell. 

125. Modern Electrical Theory. (3 Hrs.) 
Associate Professor George. 

126. Modern Electrical Theory. (3 Hrs.) 
Associate Professor George. 

131. Theoretical Mechanics. (3 Hrs.) 

Associate Professor George. 

132. Heat Wave Motion. (3 Hrs.) 
Associate Professor George. 

133. E'ectricily and Magnetism. (3 Hrs.) 
Professor Colwell. 

134. Electricity and Magnetism. (3 Hrs.) 
Professor Colwell. 

141, 143, 145, 147. Physics Seminar. (1 Hr.) 
Professor Colwell. 

142, 144, 146, 148... Physics Seminar. (1 Hr.) 
Professor Colwell. 

149. Intermediate Laboratory. (2 Hrs.) 
Professor Colwell. 

150. Intermediate Laboratory. (2 Hrs.) 
Professor Colwell. 

Courses for Graduate Students Only. 

181. Physical Optics. (3 Hrs.) 

First semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Molby, 21 M. 

182. Physical Optics. (3 Hrs.) 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Molby, 21 M. 

183. Kinetic Theory of Gases and Molecular Physics. (3 Hrs.) 
First semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Colwell, 16 M. 



84 West Virginia University 

184. Kinetic Theory of Gases and Molecular Physics. (3 Hrs.) 
Second semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Colwfll, 

16 M. 

185. The Electron Theory. (3 Hrs.) 

First semester; hours to be arranged. Associate Professor 
George, 15 M. 

186. The Electron Theory. (3 Hrs.) Continuation of Course 
185. 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. Associate Professor 
George. 

187. Radio- Activity. (3 Hrs.) 

First semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Molby, 16 M. 

188. Radio-Activity. (3 Hrs.) Continuation of Course 187. 
Second semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Molby, 16 M. 

189. Conduction of Electricity Through Gases. (3 Hrs.) 

First semester; hours to be arranged. Associate Professor 
George, 20 M. 

190. Conduction of Electricity Through Gases. (3 Hrs.) Con- 
tinuation of Course 189. 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. Associate Professor 
George, 20 M. 

191. Electric Waves. (3 Hrs.) 

First semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Colwell, 16 M. 

192. Electric Waves. (3 Hrs.) Continuation of Course 191. 
Second semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Colwell, 

16 M. 

193. Experimental Research. (Credit according to work done but 
not to exceed 10 hours in all). Required of all candidates for Master 
of Arts degree with major in Physics. 

First semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Colwell, 16 M. 

194. Experimental Research. Continuation of Course 193. 
Second semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Colwell, 

16 M. 

NOTE: Not more than one of the purely graduate courses offered 
by any one instructor will be given in any one semester. 

It is highly desirable that candidates lor the master's degree 
should have a reading knowledge of both French and German. 



Graduate Work 85 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES— FRENCH. 

Courses Open Also to Advanced Undergraduates. 

121. The Romantic Movement. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisites: French 
13, 14, 15, 16 or equivalent. 

First semester; M., W., F., 11:00. Professor Stathers, 11 W. 

122. French Literature since 1850. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisites: 
French 13, 14, 15, 16 or equivalent. 

Second semester; M., W., F., 11:00. Professor Stathers, 11 W. 

123. The Contemporary Drama. (2 Hrs.) 

First semester; T., Th., 9:00. Professor Darby, 14 W. 

124. Historical Novel in the 19th Century. (2 Hrs.) 
Second semester; T., Th., 9:00. Professor Darby, 14 W. 

129. Literature of the 16th Century. (2 Hrs.) 

First semester; T., Th., 8:00. Associate Professor Spiker, 13 W. 

130. The 16th Century after 1550. (2 Hrs.) 
Second semester; T., Th., 8:00. Associate Professor Spiker, 13 



W. 



w. 



131. Advanced Composition and Phonetics. (2 Hrs.) 
First semester; T., Th., 11:00. Professor Stathers, 11 W. 

132. Problems in Teaching French. (2 Hrs.) 

Second semester; T., Th., 11:00. Professor Stathers, 11 W. 

Courses Open to Graduates Only. 

195. Seminar. (2-5 Hrs.) 

First semester; hour to arranged. Professor Stathers, 11 W. 

196. Seminar. (2-5 Hrs) 

Second semester; hour to be arranged. Professor Stathers, 11 



SPANISH. 
Courses Open Also to Advanced Undergraduates. 

115. Lyric Poetry. ..(3 Hrs.) Omitted 1925-26. 

First semester; M., W., F., 8:00. Assistant Professor Mitrani. 

116. Civilization and Culture. (3 Hrs.) (Omitted 1925-26.) 

121. Literature of the Golden Age. (3 Hrs.) 

First semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Professor Stathers, 11 W. 



86 West Virginia University 

122. The Golden Age after Lope de Vega. (3 Hrs.) 

Second semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Professor Stathers, 11 W. 

123. Spanish American Literature. (2 Hrs.) (Omitted 1925-26.) 
First semester; T., Th., 8:00. Assistant Professor Mitrani. 

124. Spanish American Literature. (2 Hrs.) A continuation of 
Course 123. (Omitted 1925-26.) 

Second semester; T., Th., 8:00. Assistant Professor Mitrani. 

Courses Open to Graduate Students Only. 

195. Literature of the 16th Century. (3 Hrs.) (Omitted 1925-26.) 
First semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Professor Stathers, 11 W. 

196. Old Spanish. (3 Hrs.) Omitted 1925-26. 

Second semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Professor Stathers, 11 W. 

ZOOLOGY. 
Courses Open Also to Advanced Undergraduates. 

110. Principles of Biology. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisite: Zoology 1 
or an equivalent. This course may count towards a minor for grad- 
uate work by arranging with the instructor in course 10 for additional 
work. 

Second semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Professor Chidester, 46 W. 

131, 132, 133. Comparative Anatomy, Histology and Embryology. 
(3-5 Hrs. per semester.) These courses may count towards a minor 
for graduate work. 

First semester; M., F., 2:00-5:00. Professor Chidester, 47 W. 

140. Current Literature. (1 Hr.) 

First and second semesters; hours to be arranged. Professor 
Reese, 47 W. 

Courses Open Only to Graduates. 

181, 182, 183, 184, 185. Comparative Anatomy, Histology and 
Embryology. (l-'5 Hrs. per semester.) 

First and second semesters; hours to be arranged. Professor 
Reese, Professor Chidester and Assistant Professor Taylor, 47 W. 

190, 191, 192, 193, 194, 195. Research Work. (1-5 Hrs. per sem- 
ester.) 

First and second semesters; hours to be arranged. Professor 
Reese, Professor Chidester and Assistant Professor Taylor, 47 W. 

NOTE: For courses in entomology and genetics see announce- 
ment of courses in the College of Agriculture. 



Graduate Work 87 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING. 

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION. 

121. Vocational Education. (2 Hrs.) Open to juniors, seniors, 
and graduates. Graduate students will work out special problems 
under the direction of the instructor. This course is intended for 
superintendents, principals, and vocational teachers to acquaint them 
with the influences which tend to broaden our educational activities, 
with federal and state aid, with the types of work suitable for differ- 
ent communities, and with the qualifications of teachers. 

First semester; T., Th. f 10:00. Professor Maclin, 16 W. 

STEAM, GAS AND EXPERIMENTAL ENGINEERING. 

122. Heat Engines. (3 Hrs.) Continuation of Thermodynamics 
121. 

Second semester. Professor Grumbein. 

123. Power Plant Design. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisite: Thermodyna- 
mics 121. 

First semester. Professor Grumbein. 

125. Steam Turbines. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisite: Heat Engines 
122. 

Second semester. Professor Grumbein. 

126. Gas Engines and Gas Engineering. (3 Hrs.) Fuel gases, 
gas production and transmission, gas engines, etc. Prerequisite: Heat 
Engines 122. 

Second semester. Professor Grumbein. 

127. Heating and Ventilating. (3 Hrs.) Optional for students 
in mechanical engineering. Prerequisite: Thermodynamics 121 or 
Heat Engineering 120. 

Second semester. Professor Grumbein. 

133. Engineering Laboratory. (2 Hrs.) Continuation of Lab- 
oratory 132. Prerequisite: Engineering Laboratory 132. 

Second semester. Professor Grumbein and Mr. Amidon. 

134. Engineering Laboratory. Open only to graduates. Com- 
mercial tests and research work. Prerequisite: Engineering Lab- 
oratory 133. Credit will be given on the basis of the time spent in 
the laboratory and the progress of the students. 

Hours to be arranged. Dean Jones and Professor Grumbein. 

136. Highway Laboratory. Open to fourth year and graduates 
in civil, mechanical, chemical, and mining engineering. Credit will be 
given on basis of time spent in the laboratory and the progress of 
the student. 

Hours to be arranged. Professor Grumbein. 



88 West Virginia University 

STRUCTURAL AND HYDRAULIC ENGINEERING. 

145. Steel Building Design. (3 Hrs.) As part of this course a 
small mill building is completely designed and show drawings made 
for it. Prerequisite: Roofs and Bridges 141. 

Either semester. Professor Davis. 

146. Foundations and Masonry. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisites: Me- 
chanics of Materials 71, and Mechanical Laboratory 130. 

First semester. Professor Davis and Mr. Carpenter. 

150. Water Power Engineering. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisite: Hy- 
draulics 73. 

Second semester. Professor Davis. 

151. Hydraulic Measurements. (1 Hr.) Hydraulics 73. 
Either semester. Professor Davis. 

154. Statically Indeterminate Structures. Open only to grad- 
uate students. A continuation of Course 143. 

155. Advanced Bridge Design. Computation and drawings for 
some type of statically indeterminate structure. Prerequisite: Courses 
143 and 142. 

Credit and hours to be arranged; both semesters. Professor 
Davis. 

157. Advanced Water Power Engineering. A continuation of 
Course 150 with special emphasis on hydrology and the design of 
turbines. Open only to graduate students. 

Credit and hours to be arranged; both semesters. Professor 
Davis. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 

162. Transients, Surges and Electric Waves. (3 Hrs.) Prerequi- 
site: Electrical Engineering 56. 

Second semester. Professor Forman. 

164. Electrical Research. For graduate students only. 
Hours to be arranged. Professor Forman. 

165. Industrial Applications of Electricity. (3 Hrs.) Prerequi- 
site: Electrical Engineering 56. 

Second semester. Professor Hall. 

167. High Tension Dielectric Phenomena. (3 Hrs.) Prerequi- 
site: Engineering 55. 

Second semester. Professor Forman. 



Graduate Work 89 

168. Telephone Engineering. (3 Hrs.) One laboratory period 
a week. Prerequisite: Engineering 55. 

Second semester. Professor Forman. 

169. Thesis. (3 Hrs.) Special investigation or original research 
on some topic relating to electrical engineering. 

Professor Forman and Professor Hall. 

158. Statically Indeterminate Structures. A continuation of 
Course 154. Open only to graduate students. 

Credit and hours to be arranged; both semesters. Professor 
Davis. 

CHEMICAL AND METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING. 

Professor Hodge and Assistant Professor Koehler. 

171. Metallurgy of Iron and Steel. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 6. 

First semester. Professor Hodge. 

173. Metallurgy Laboratory. (1 Hr.) To accompany Course 171. 
Preparation and microscopical examination of twenty-five specimens 
of iron and steel; analytical determinations. 

First semester. Professor Hodge and Assistant Professor 
Koehler. 

174. Metallography Laboratory. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisites: Metal- 
lurgy 171, 172 and 173 and Chemistry 60. 

Second semester. Professor Hodge. 

175. Ceramics. (2 Hrs.) A review of the ceramic industries. 
Chemical and engineering principles applied in the manufacture of 
ceramic materials, pottery, enamels and glass. Prerequisite: Chem- 
istry 21. 

Either semester. Assistant Professor Koehler. 

176. Ceramics Laboratory. (1 Hrs.) Working and testing of 
clays. Compounding of bodies, glazes, and enamels. Biscuit and 
glost firing; firing of enamel ware. Factory control tests. Prerequi- 
site: Chemical Engineering 175. 

Either semester. Assistant Professor Koehler. 

177. Refractories. (1 Hr.) Manufacture, properties, and uses 
of refractory materials. Standard tests. Study of phase rule dia- 
grams of refractory materials. Prerequisite: Chemistry 21. 

Either semester. Assistant Professor Koehler. 



90 West Virginia University 

180. Benzene Derivatives. (2 Hrs.) Manufacture of commercial 
products from benzene and related compounds; intermediates, dyes, 
drugs and explosives. Prerequisite: Chemistry 33. Recitation and 
laboratory. 

Second semester. Professor Hodge. 

181. Chemical Engineering and Manufactures. (2 Hrs.) Pre- 
requisites: Chemistry 60 and Mechanical Laboratory 131. 

First semester. Professor Hodge. 

182. Industrial Chemistry Laboratory. (2 Hrs.) To accompany 
Course 181. 

First semester. Professor Hodge and Assistant Professor 

KOEHLER. 

183. Chemical Engineering and Manufactures. (2 Hrs.) Con- 
tinuation of Course 181. 

Second semester. Professor Hodge. 

184. Chemical Engineering Laboratory. (2 Hrs.) To accompany 
Course 183. Continuation of Course 182. 

Second semester. Professor Hodge and Assistant Professor 
Koehler. 

186. Oil Refininig Laboratory. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisites: Chem- 
istry 33 and Mechanical Laboratory 131. 
Second semester. Professor Hodge. 

190. Electrochemical Industries. (3 Hrs.) Primarily for grad- 
uate students; open to qualified chemical engineering seniors. Pre- 
requisites: Electrical Engineering 53 and Chemistry 60. 

Second semester. Assistant Professor Koehler. 

192. Biochemical Industries. (3 Hrs.) Primarily for graduate 
students, open to qualified seniors in chemical engineering. Prerequi- 
sites: Chemical Engineering 183 and 184. 

First semester. Professor Hodge. 

193. Coal Tar and By-Products. Open only to graduate students 
and qualified seniors in chemical engineering. Prerequisites: Chem- 
ical Engineering 183 and 180 and 184. 

Second semester. Professor Hodge. 



Graduate Work 91 

195. Thesis. (2-5 Hrs.) Primarily for seniors in chemical engi- 
neering and graduate students. Some problem in chemical engineer- 
ing or industrial chemistry is selected for investigation. A carefully 
prepared report is required. Credit is given in proportion to time 
put in and results obtained. 

First semester. Professor Hodge and Mr. Koehler. 

196. Research Problems. (5-10 Hrs.) More advanced and ex- 
tended work on research problems than can be given in Course 185. 
Credit in proportion to work done but as a general rule no student 
will be allowed to register for this course who cannot put in time 
equivalent to 8 hours credit per semester for two consecutive se- 
mesters. Prerequisites: Chemical Engineering 183 and 184. 

Either semester. Professor Hodge and Assistant Professor 
Koehler. 

197. Research Problems. A continuation. 
Second semester. 



92 West Virginia University 

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION. 

108. Principles of Vocational Teaching. (3 Hrs.) The devel- 
opment of principles underlying instruction in agricultural occupa- 
tions. Should precede or accompany Course 11. Primarily for juniors. 

Second semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Associate Professor Allen. 

111. Special Methods in Teaching Vocational Agriculture. (3 Hrs.) 

Required of students preparing to teach vocational agriculture in 
secondary schools. 

First semester for seniors; T., Th., 8:00; third hour to be ar- 
ranged. Assistant Professor Olney. 

113. Directed Teaching. (2 to 5 Hrs.) Required of all pros- 
pective teachers of vocational agriculture in order to qualify for cer- 
tificate on graduation. Prerequisite: Agricultural Education 11. 

Either semester; T., Th., 10:00. Assistant Professor Olney. 

115. Methods and Materials of Visual Instruction. (2 Hrs.) 

Practice in the preparation and use of illustrative materials and de- 
vices used in teaching vocational agriculture. (Offered in alternate 
years, beginning 1926-27.) 

First semester; T., Th,, 9:00. Mr. Parsons. 

131. Rural Organization. (3 Hrs.) A study of the social and 
economic factors affecting rural life. Directed observation and par- 
ticipation in rural social programs. For seniors. 

First semester; M., W., F., 11:00. Associate Professor Allen. 

181, 182, 183, 184. Research. (1 to 5 Hrs. per semester). Pre- 
requisites: Course 8, 31, and 11 or 20. 

First and second semesters; hours to be arranged. Staff. 

AGRONOMY. 

116. Breeding of Field Crops. (3 Hrs.) Methods of improving 
crop plants by breeding. Prerequisites : Agronomy 1 and Genetics 21. 

Second semester; T., Th., 9:00; and Th., 2:00-5:00. Professor 
Garber. 

117. 118, 119, 120. (Special Topics. (1 to 3 Hrs. per semester.) 
Assigned literature and problems, with discussions. A student may 
elect elementary biometry, experimental field technic, a phase of crop 
production or a phase of crop breeding. Prerequisite: Consent of 
instructor. 

First and second semesters; hours to be arranged. Professor 
Garber and Associate Professor Odland. 



Graduate Work 93 

181, 182, 183, 184. Research in Farm Crops. (1 to 5 Hrs. per 

semester.) 

First and second semesters; hours to be arranged. Professor 
Garber and Associate Professor Odland. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY. 

111. Animal Nutrition. (2 Hrs.) Composition of feeds and the 
metabolism of food nutrients. Open to juniors and seniors. Pre- 
requisite: Chemistry 16. 

First semester; M., 2:00-6:00. Professor Livesay. 

112. Feeding Farm Animals. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisite: Animal 
Husbandry 11. 

Second semester; M., W., F., 11:00. Assistant Professor Wilson 
and Mr. Wheeler. 

143. Advanced Stock Judging. (2 Hrs.) Students taking this 
course will be required to participate in a tour of inspection of repre- 
sentative flocks, herds and studs. Prerequisite: Animal Husbandry 
41. 

First semester; two laboratory periods; W., 2:00-5:00; S., 8:00- 
12:00. Staff. 

181, 182, 183, 184. Research. (1 to 5 Hrs. per semester.) 
First and second semesters; hours to be arranged. Staff. 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY. 

112. Milk Production. (4 Hrs.) For juniors and seniors. 
Second semester; M., W., F., 9:00; one laboratory period, M., 
2:00-5:00. Professor Anthony. 

136. Dairy Chemistry. (2 Hrs.) For seniors. Prerequisite: 
Dairy Husbandry 5 and 6. 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. 

138. Advanced Dairy Judging. (2 Hrs.) For seniors. Judging 
dairy cattle and dairy products. Prerequisite: Dairy Husbandry 11. 

Second semester; two laboratory periods T., Th., 4:00-6:00. As- 
sociate Professor Henderson, Mr. Gifford and Mr. Trout. 

181, 182, 183, 184. Graduate Research. (1 to 5 Hrs. per se- 
mester.) Special assigned dairy problems. 

First and second semesters; hours to be arranged. Professor 
Anthony. 



94 West Virginia University 

ENTOMOLOGY. 

103. Advanced General Entomology. (3 Hrs.) 

First semester; T., Th., 10:00-12:00. Professor Peairs. 

105, 106, 107, 108. Systematic Entomology. (1 to 3 Hrs. per 

semester.) 

First and second semesters; hours to be arranged. Professor 
Peairs. 

180. Insect Biology. (3 Hrs.) 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Peairs. 

181, 182, 183, 184. Research. (1 to 3 Hrs. per semester.) 
First and second semesters; hours to be arranged. Porfessor 

Peairs. 

FARM ECONOMICS. 

116. Agricultural Land Problems. (2 Hrs.) Open to seniors. 
A study of land systems and policies of the leading agricultural 
countries. 

Second semester; T., Th., 9:00. Professor Dadisman and Mr. 
Eke. 

181, 182, 183, 184. Research in Farm Economics. (1 to 3 Hrs. 
per semester.) 

First and second semesters; hours to be arranged. Staff. 

GENETICS. 

121. Genetics. (3 Hrs.) A study of the principles of heredity. 
First semester; M., F., 10:00; T., Th., or M., F., 4:30. Professor 

Peairs. 

122. Genetics. (1 Hr.) Laboratory work to follow Course 121. 
Prerequisite: Course 121. 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Peairs. 

HORTICULTURE. 

109. Systematic Pomology. (3 Hrs.) Open to juniors and seniors. 
A systematic study of the economic fruits. Prerequisite: Horticul- 
ture 1. 

First semester; T., Th., 9:00; S., 9:00-12:00. Asscoiate Pro- 
fessor Knowlton. 

112. Commercial Fruit Production. (4 Hrs.) Open to juniors 
and seniors. Prerequisite: Horticulture 9. 

Second semester; M., W., F., 9:00; and one laboratory period 
F., 2:00-5:00. Associate Professor Crane. 



Graduate Work 95 

118. Sprays and Spraying. (2 Hrs.) Open to seniors. Pre- 
requisite: Consultation. 

Second semester; S., 8:00-12:00. Associate Professor Crane. 

119. Horticultural Field Trip. (1 to 2 Hrs.) Open to seniors. 
A trip of one or two weeks (the first week to be before college opens) 
will be made through the fruit regions of Eastern West Virginia, 
Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania. Registration should be made 
in the spring before college closes. Prerequisite: Horticulture 9 
and 12. 

First semester. Professor Dorsey and Associate Professor 
Crane. 

151, 152, 153, 154. Horticultural Seminar. (1 Hr. per semester.) 
For juniors and seniors. 

First and second semesters; hours to be arranged. Professor 
Dorsey. 

155, 156. Advanced Horticulture. (3 Hrs. per semester.) Open 
to seniors. Prerequisites: Horticulture 9 and 12, and Botany 12. 

Both semesters; M., W., F., 11:00. Professor Dorsey and Asso- 
ciate Professor Knowlton. 

158. Horticultural Crop Breeding. (3 Hrs.) Open to seniors. 
Prerequisite: Genetics 21. 

Second semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Professor Dorsey. 

181, 182, 183, 184. Graduate Research. (5 Hrs. per semester.) 
First and second semesters; hours to be arranged. Professor 

Dorsey, Associate Professors Knowlton and Crane and Assistant 

Professor Westover. 

PLANT PATHOLOGY. 

109, 110. Experimental Plant Pathology. (2 to 5 Hrs. per se 

mester.) Prerequisite: Plant Pathology 3 or its equivalent. 

First and second semesters; hours to be arranged. Professor 
Giddings and Assistant Professor Leonian. 

181, 182, 183, 184. Research. (2 to 5 Hrs. per semester.) Pre- 
requisites: Plant Pathology 3 and 9 or their equivalent. 

First and second semesters; hours to be arranged. Professor 
Giddings and Assistant Professor Leonian. 



96 West Virginia University 

POULTRY HUSBANDRY. 

121. Advanced Poultry Judging. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisite: Poul- 
try 14. 

First semester; F., 2:00-6:00. Associate Professor Andrews 
and Mr. Wightman. 

181, 182, 183, 184. Research. (1 to 3 Hrs. per semester.) 
Both semesters; hours to be arranged. Associate Professor An- 
drews. 

SOILS. 

107. Soil Chemistry. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisites: Soils 1 and quali- 
tative and organic chemistry. Open to seniors. 

Either semester ; three laboratory periods to be arranged. Associ- 
ate Professor Deatrick. 

181, 182, 183, 184. Research. (1 to 5 Hrs. per semester.) 
Both semesters and summer; hours to be arranged. Associate 
Professor Deatrick. 

THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

ANATOMY. 

107. Advanced Histology. (2 Hrs.) Open to advanced and 
graduate students. 

Hours to be arranged. Associate Professor Dodds. 

108. Advanced Embryology. (2 Hrs.) Open to advanced and 
graduate students. 

Hours to be arranged. Associate Professor Dodds. 

109. Advanced Anatomy. (Credit to be arranged.) Open to 
advanced and graduate students. 

Professor Morris. 

110. Anatomy of the Eye, Bar, and Nose. (2 Hrs.) Open to 
advanced and graduate students. 

Professor Morris. 



The College of Arts 
and Sciences 



THE FACULTY. 

FRANK BUTLER TROTTER, LL.D., President 

JAMES MORTON CALLAHAN, Ph.D., Dean and Professor of His- 
tory and Political Science. 

DANIEL BOARDMAN PURINTON, LL.D., President and Professor 
of Philosophy, Emeritus 

JAMES SCOTT STEWART, B.S., Professor of Mathematics, 
Emeritus 

ROBERT WILLIAM DOUTHAT, Ph.D., Professor of Latin, 
Emeritus 

SAMUEL BOARDMAN BROWN, A.M., Professor of Geology and 
Mineralogy 

ROBERT ALLEN ARMSTRONG, L.H.D., Professor of the English 
Language and Literature 

ALFRED JARRETT HARE, A.M., Professor of the Latin Language 
and Literature 

JASPER NEWTON DEAHL, Ph.D., Professor of Education 

JOHN HARRINGTON COX, A.M., Professor of English Philology 

JOHN ARNDT EIESLAND, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics 

ALBERT MOORE REESE, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology 

OLIVER PERRY CHITWOOD, Ph.D., Professor of History 

MADISON STATHERS, Ph.D.,' Professor of Romance Languages 

WAITMAN BARBE, Litt.D., Professor of English 

ENOCH HOWARD VICKERS, A.M., Professor of Economics and 
Sociology 

CHARLES EDWARD BISHOP, Ph.D., Professor of the Greek 
Language and Literature 



98 West Virginia University 

FRIEND EBENEZER CLARK, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry 

CHARLES BENTON CANNADAY, A.M., Professor of Latin 

CHARLES HENRY AMBLER, Ph.D., Professor of History 

LORIMER VICTOR CAVINS, Ph.D., Professor of Education 

WILBUR JONES KAY, A.M., Professor of Public Speaking 

ARLEIGH LEE DARBY, A.M., Professor of French and Italian 

DAVID DALE JOHNSON, A.M., Professor of English 

CARL ALFRED JACOBSON, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry 

LAWRENCE BENJAMIN HILL, Ph.D., Professor of Education 

SAMUEL MORRIS, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry 

FRED A. MOLBY, Ph.D., Professor Physics 

LOUIS AUGUST RUFENER, Ph.D., Professor of Economics 

WILSON P. SHORTRIDGE, Ph.D., Professor of History 

JOHN LITTLEFIELD TILTON, Ph.D., Professor of Geology 

THOMAS LUTHER HARRIS, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology 

FLOYD EARLE CHIDESTER, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology 

PERRY DANIEL STRAUSBAUGH, (B.S.), Ph.D., Professor of 
Botany 

HOLLY ESTIL CUNNINGHAM, (A.M.), Ph.D., Professor of 
Philosophy 

JOHN E. WINTER, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology 

ALLEN WILSON PORTERFIELD, Ph.D., Professor of German 

ROBERT C. COLWELL, Ph.D., Professor of Physics 

LONNA DENNIS ARNETT, Ph.D., Librarian and Instructor in 
Library Science 



HUBERT HILL, M.S., Associate Professor of Chemistry 

EARL CLAUDIUS HAMILTON DAVIES, Ph.D., Associate Pro- 
fessor of Chemistry 

ENOCH FRANKLIN GEORGE, Ph.D., Associate Professor of 
Physics 

PERLEY ISAAC REED, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English 

ROBERT CLIFTON SPANGLER, A.M., Associate Professor of 
Botany 



The College of Arts and Sciences 99 

IRA WELLBORN SMITHEY*, Ph.D., Associate Professor of 
Chemistry 

CLAUDE CARL SPIKER, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Romance 
Languages 

HARRY CHRISTOPHER HUMPHREYS, Ph.D., Associate Professor 
of Education 

EARL READ SCHEFFEL, M.S., Associate Professor of Geology 

LAKIN FISKE ROBERTS, A.M., Associate Professor of Education 

ELIZABETH MATTINGLY STALNAKER, Ph.D., Associate Pro- 
fessor of Education 



BENJAMIN WALTER KING, A.M., Assistant Professor of Eco- 
nomics 

HARVEY CARSON GRUMBINE,- Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 
English 

REBECCA LUELLA POLLOCK 1 , A.M., Assistant Professor of 
Education 

LILY BELL SEFTON DEATRICK*, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 
Chemistry 

CLARENCE NEWTON REYNOLDS, Jr., Ph.D., Assistant Professor 
of Mathematics 

EDMUND DANIEL McGARRY, A.B., M.B.A., Assistant Professor 
of Economics 

MARGARET BUCHANAN, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathe- 
matics 

JOHN RICHARDSON MILLER, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 
French and Spanish 

CHARLES MITRANI 1 , M.A., Assistant Professor of Romance 
Languages 

BIRD MARGARET TURNER, Ph.D., Assistarit Professor of Mathe- 
matics 

WERNER CASPER MICHEL, P.D.S., Assistant Professor of Ger- 
man 

JACOB SAPOSNEKOW, A.M., Assistant Professor of Sociology 

ROBERT BARCLAY DUSTMAN, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 
Chemistry 



lOn leave of absence 1924-25. 
2Resigned, April, 1925. 



100 West Virginia University 

LESTER COLLINS FARMS, A.M., Assistant Professor of English 

JEAN ELNORA RICHMOND, M.A., Assistant Professor of Edu- 
cation and Home Economics 

LELAND HART TAYLOR, S.D., Assistant Professor in Zoology 

HARRY CURTIS MITCHELL, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History 



CLARA LYTLE, A.M., Instructor in English 

ELIZABETH FROST REED, A.M., Instructor in English 

NELLIE PERRELL AMMONS, A.M., Instructor in Botany 

WILLIAM ORR SWAN, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry 

GREEK SAYRE, A.M., Instructor in English 

LOUIS WATSON CHAPPELL, M.A., Instructor in English 

HELEN PURINTON PETTIGREW, A.M., Instructor in English 

ROBERT GRAHAM TURNER, A.M., Instructor in Chemistry 

MARJA BROWN STEADMAN FEAR, A.B., Instructor in Public 
Speaking 

MARTHA THEODA FULTON, A.M., Instructor in English 

ROBERT LOUIS MOLITOR, M.A., Instructor in English 

GRACE MARGARET GRIFFIN, A.B., Instructor in Physical Edu- 
cation for Women 

ARCHIBALD MACGREGOR GRIMES, A.M., Instructor in Spanish 

PAUL STUART BUCHANAN, A.B., Instructor in Public Speaking 

SHERMAN WILLIAM BROWN, A.M., Instructor in Romance 
Languages 

JOSEPH BANKS RHINE, M.S., Instructor in Botany 

SIDNEY LAMONT McGEE, A.B., Instructor in Romance Languages 

DUNCAN CLAIRE HARKINS, A.M., Instructor in Mathematics 

MYRON IRVING BARKER, A.B., Instructor in Romance Languages 

BETRAM DONALD BARCLAY, B.S., Instructor in Botany 

ARMAND RENE COLLETT, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry 

MORRIS JOSEPH FIELDS, M.B.A., Instructor in Economics 

CLARENCE EUGENE GARLAND, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry 

ANDREAS ELVIKEN, Cand. Mag., Instructor in History 



The College of Arts and Sciences 101 

HANNIBAL ALBERT DAVIS, A.B., Assistant in Mathematics 

HARRY HILL, M.S., Assistant in Physics 

WARREN SCUDDER BOURNE, A.B., Assistant in Zoology 

CAREY WOOFTER, A.B., Assistant in English 

LYNN WADDELL, A.B., Assistant in English 

FRANCES HARSHBARGER, A.B., Assistant in Mathematics 

ALTON BEE FORTNEY, A.B., Assistant in Chemistry 

JOHN FRANK BARTLETT, Student Assistant in Chemistry 

PAUL WALKER EDEBURN, B.S., Assistant in Chemistry 

JOHN WILLIAM FARREN, B.S.Ch.E., Assistant in Chemistry 

HAZEL VANDYKE ROBERTS, A.B., Assistant in Economics 

GEORGE D. HOTT, A.M., Assistant in History 

C FREDERIC SHROEDER, Jr., A.B., Assistant in Zoology 

WRIGHT MONTGOMERY WELTON, Student Assistant in Chem- 
istry 

LYLE KERMIT HERNDON, Student Assistant in Chemistry 

CONSTANCE JANE SHARPLESS, Student Assistant in Chemistry 

EDITH McKAY, Storekeeper in Chemistry 

CHARLES WILLARD DRIVER, Student Assistant in Chemistry 

ALBERT BEVERLY SCOTT, Jr., Student Assistant in Chemistry 

ROY ELLIOTT BOONE, Student Assistant in Chemistry 

MAHON LUCAS HENDERSON, Student Assistant in Physics 

MAURICE COFFYN HOLMES, Student Assistant in Physics 

LUCY MALINDA WOLFE, Student Assistant in Chemistry 

DOROTHY WOODBURN, Student Assistant in Chemistry 

HUGO BLUMENBERG, Student Assistant in Economics 

JOHN VIRGIL ROACH, Student Assistant in Economics 

HAROLD FRANCIS PORTERFIELD, Student Assistant in History 

NETTIE SOUTHWORTH HERNDON, Student Assistant in History 

EULAI BROOKS CALLAGHAN, Student Assistant in Chemistry 

THOMAS STEPHEN CRAWFORD, Student Assistant in Mathe- 
matics 



102 West Virginia University 

THEODORE COOPER, Student Assistant in Zoology 

RICHARD CONNER HAISLIP, Student Assistant in Zoology 

CHARLES LYNVILLE LEPPERT, Student Assistant in Zoology 

MILTON WOLPERT, Student Assistant in Zoology 

LEE FULMER, Mechanician in Physics Department 

JOHN PIERPONT HELMICK, Student Assistant in Philosophy 

JANE COX, Student Assistant in Psychology 



The College of Arts and Sciences 



103 



ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS. 

For admission to the College of Arts and Sciences the student 
must have credit for fifteen units of secondary school work, i. e., the 
work of a standard four-year high school. 

A. The following groups are required: 



(1) 

(2) 

(3) 
(4) 
(5) 



B. 



Three or four units of English 1 . 

Two units in mathematics (one in algebra and one in 

geometry). 
Three units in a third subject. 
Two units in a fourth subject. 
Four units elective. 
Work in the following subjects not to exceed the number of 
units placed after each subject will be accepted: 
4 units Science 3 
Physics 
Chemistry 
4 units Biology 
3 units Botany 
3 units Geology 
3 units Zoology 
2 units General Science 
2 units Physical Geography 
Physiology 
Hygiene and sanitation 
2 units Commercial Geography 
1 unit Commercial law 
Y2 unit Vocational subjects (not 
V2 unit ceed four units in 



English 

Foreign Languages 2 
Latin 
Greek 
French 
German 
Spanish 
Italian 



Mathematics 
Algebra 

Plane Geometry 
Solid Geometry 
Trigonometry 



History and Economics 
History 
Civics 

Elementary economics 
Sociology 

Education 

Drawing 

Free-hand drawing 
Mechanical drawing 



units 
unit 
unit 
unit 



2 units 



Agriculture 
Household Arts 
Manual training 
Bookkeeping or book- 
keeping and commer- 
cial arithmetic com- 
bined 

Shorthand and type- 
writing combined 



1 


unit 


1 


unit 


1 


unit 


1 


unit 


1 


unit 


1 


unit 


1 


unit 


y 2 


unit 


% 


unit 


1 2 


unit 


% 


unit 


% 


unit 


; to ex- 

11 \ 


3 


units 


3 units 


3 


units 



unit 
unit 



Music: — 
or piano 4 



violin, organ 



2 units 



2 units 



2 units 



1A student who enters with three units of English must elect six hours of col- 
lege English in addition to the minimum number of hours in that subject required 
for his degree. 

2Not less than two units of one foreign language will be accepted for entrance 
unless enough additional work in that laneruage is taken in college to complete a 
minimum of two units. (Six hours college work is regarded as equivalent to one 
entrance unit.) 

3A group of two or three units in science may be made by combining one unit 
each of any of the following : physics, chemistry, biology, botany, zoology, geology. 

4For conditions governing credit for music see Announcements of the School of 
Music. 



1°4 West Virginia University 

REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 
BACCALAUREATE DEGREES. 

Only one baccalaureate degree is regularly conferred in the Col- 
lege of Arts and Sciences, that of Bachelor of Arts. 

The degree of Bachelor of Science is conferred only as a first 
degree upon candidates who are pursuing either the combined science 
and engineering course, the combined science and agricultural course, 
or the combined scientific and medical course. See page 60. 

Amount of Work Required. 

The "semester hour" is the standard for computing the amount 
of work required for graduation in the curricula leading to these 
degrees. The "hour" represents the amount of work done in one 
semester (eighteen weeks) in one recitation hour with two preparation 
hours a week. No student is permitted to register for less than four- 
teen hours or more than eighteen hours of work in any one semester 
or for more than thirty-four hours in any one year. 

The 'baccalaureate degree in the College of Arts and Sciences is 
conferred upon any student who complies with the general regulations 
of the University concerning degrees as announced on page 39 of the 
University Catalogue, satisfies all entrance requirements, and secures 
credit for one hundred and twenty-eight semester hours selected in 
accordance with the following provisions. 

The Major Subject. 

At the beginning of the sophomore year the student must select 
as his major study one of the following subjects: 

English Spanish Mathematics 

Public Speaking History Botany 

Greek Political Science Zoology 

Latin Economics Entomology 

German Sociology Geology 

French Physics Education 

Italian Chemistry Philosophy 

Home Economics 
The head of the department to which this major subject belongs 
becomes the student's class officer. The major requirement is 30 
hours, which may be either 30 hours in the one major subject or 20 
to 25 hours in that subject with 5 to 10 hours in another subject 
closely related. The class officer may designate the courses to be 
taken in the major and allied subjects and may require at least 25 
hours in the one subject. Additional courses in the major subject or 
in the allied subject may of course be taken as elective if the student 



The College of Arts and Sciences 105 

so desires. The maximum amount of credit allowed in any one sub- 
ject is 36 hours, except that when, in the judgment of the class officer, 
the quality of a student's work and his plans for his future occupa- 
tion justify such action, the class officer may, subject to the approval 
of the committee on classification and grades, permit such student to 
take not more than 45 hours in one subject. 

Special Requirements. 
For Students Who Desire the Degree of A.B. 

During his course each student must take courses in each of eight 
groups of subjects as shown below: 

1. English composition (English 1 and 2).. 6 Hrs. 

English literature (Engiisn 26 and 27) 4 

2. One foreign language 20 

3. History and political science, or economics 
.and sociology 8 

4. Pnysics, chemistry, or mathematics; any one 8 

5. Botany, zoology, geology or entomology; 
.any one 8 

6. Education, philosophy, public speaking; 
.any one 8 

7. Military science (when required) 4 

8. Electives; not less than 32 

At least five hours must be taken in each subject offered as an 

elective, except that not more than eight hours of credit in isolated 
courses of less than five hours credit value each, elected with the ap- 
proval of tne class officer, may be offered. 

Students who do not offer two units of language for entrance 
must do twenty-six hours of one language in college instead of twenty. 
Fewer than ten hours of one language will not be counted for credit 
unless tihe student has offered two units of the same language for 
entrance. 

Sixteen hours in one foreign language and ten hours in a second 
language may be offered in lieu of twenty hours in one language. 

For Students Who Desire to Take a Combined Course in Two 
Colleges in Six Years. 

Students who desire to secure the A.B. degree and then take the 
degree of LL.B. may complete the requirements for both degrees in 
six years by following the program in the announcements of the 
College of Law. 

Students who desire to secure the B.S. degree and then take a 
bachelor's' degree in the college of Engineering may complete the 
work for both degrees in six years or less by following the curricu- 
lum as outlined, in the Announcements of the College of Engineering. 
Those who desire to secure the B.S. and B.S.Agr. degrees in a similar 
time must follow the curriculum outlined in the Announcements of, 
the College of Agriculture. 

Students who desire to secure the B.S. degree with a view to 



106 West Virginia University 

proceeding to the 'study of 'medicine and who announce this intention 
on entering- the freshman class will be excused from the foregoing 
general requirements and may secure the degree of B.S. by taking 
sixty-four hours of work in the College of Arts and Sciences and the 
course in the School of 'Medicine. For detailed curriculum see An- 
nouncements of the School of Medicine. 

Courses in Special Fields of Work. 

Journalism. The work in journalism is at present organized as 
part of the department of English. Students who desire to devote 
special attention to this subject, because they desire either to make it 
the nucleus of a general education, or to include it as part of their 
preparation for business or industrial affairs, or to take up some 
phase of newspaper or editorial work as a career, should consult the 
head of the department of English and the instructor in charge of 
the courses in journalism in regard to a program of studies adapted 
to their needs. Such a program would ordinarily include, in addition 
to the work in journalism proper, other courses in English literature 
and composition, courses in modern history and economics and the 
usual requirements in science and foreign language. Students who 
desire to specialize in journalism should select English as their major 
subject at the beginning of the sophomore year. 

Business Administration. The University does not as yet offer a 
special course in business administration. Students who are particu- 
larly interested in this field and who wish to prepare themselves for 
specialization in it should consult with the head of the department 
of economics in planning their program of studies. The freshmen 
work of such students should ordinarily include the courses of English 
and American economic history. 

Public Health and Sanitation. (See page 175). 

Elective Courses. 

The remaining work necessary to make up the total of one hun- 
dred and twenty-eight hours required of candidates for the bachelor's 
degree, may be selected from any of the courses offered in the College 
of Arts and (Sciences. Work not to exceed fifteen hours in the College 
of Law, the College of Agriculture, the College of Engineering or the 
School of Music may be included in the list of elective credits offered 
by students in the College of Arts and Sciences. The total number 
of hours elected from other colleges shall not, however, exceed 
twenty-four in all. For detailed statements of the courses open to 
such election in each college, see the announcements of that college. 



The College of Arts and Sciences i07 

Classification of Students. 

To be classified as a freshman in the College of Arts and Sciences 
a student must have credit for at least fifteen units of entrance re- 
quirements; to be classified as a sophomore he must have fulfilled all 
entrance requirements and have credit for twenty-five hours of college 
work; as a junior, fifty-eight hours; as a senior, ninety-two hours. 

GRADUATE DEGREES. 

There are two advanced degrees conferred in the College of Arts 
and Sciences: Master of Arts and Master of Sciences. For the condi- 
tions upon which these degrees are granted see page 61 of the cata- 
logue. 

EXTENSION COURSES. 

As a part of the University Extension Service the College of Arts 
and Sciences since the year 1916 has conducted at several centers 
in various parts of the State extension courses for which regular col- 
lege credit has been given. The work given in the extension courses 
corresponds in every particular, as to class requirements and credit, 
with that given in similar courses on the campus. Similar extension 
courses will be provided in other parts of the State as the resources 
of the University will permit. 

The giving of extension courses is subject to the following con- 
ditions: (1) Courses will not be organized at any place unless the 
demand is sufficient to justify it. (2) Courses offered by resident 
instructors will be given in Morgantown and in nearby places easy of 
access, generally on Friday afternoons and Saturdays. (3) Regular 
extension instructors will offer courses only in such places as can 
be reached from their headquarters. 



108 West Virginia University 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

In the folio wing announcements each course described counts 
for the number of hours in parentheses 1 after the name of the course. 
The semester during which the course is given, the hour, the name of 
the instructor, and classroom are usually stated at the end of the 
announcement of each course. A complete statement of these details 
is to be found in the Schedules of Courses published by each college 
at the beginning of each semester. For convenience it is customary 
to designate the courses of study by the name of the department 
and the number of the particular course. Thus the course in bacteri- 
ology is known as "Botany 41"; the course in plane trigonometry 
is known as "Mathematics 4"; the course in electrical measurements 
is known as"Physics 10"; etc. The abbreviations used are W., Wood- 
burn Hall; S., Science Hall; !M., Martin Hall; M. H., Mechanical Hall; 
C, Commencement Hall; 0., Oglebay Hall; E., Experiment Station 
Building; L., Library; H., Horticulture Building; M. B., Medical 
Building. 

Courses having a second number in parenthesis following the 
first are open to graduate students. Those having Ibut one number 
above 100 are open only to graduates. 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION. 

35. Methods in Agricultural Extension. (2 Hrs.) 

Second semester; T., Th., 11:00. Assistant Professor Allen, O. 

. For detailed announcements of this course see the announcements 
of the College of Agriculture. 

AGRICULTURAL JOURNALISM. 

12. Agricultural Journalism. (2 Hrs.) 
First semester; M., F., 10:00. Mr. Stockdale, O. 
For detailed announcement of this course see the announcements 
of the College of Agriculture. 

AGRONOMY. 

Agronomy 2 is included in the list of Agricultural subjects from 
which not to exceed 15 hours may be selected for credit in the College 
of Arts and Sciences. See announcements of the College of Agricul- 
ture. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY. 

Animal Husbandry 40, 42, 43, and 45 and Dairy Husbandry 21 
are included in the list of Agricultural subjects from which not to 
exceed 15 hours may be selected for credit in the College of Arts and 
Sciences. See announcements of the College of Agriculture. 



The College of Arts and Sciences l° 9 

BOTANY. • 

Professor Strausbaugh, Associate Professor Spangler, Mr. Rhine, 
Miss Ammons, and Mr. Barclay. 

NOTE : Courses 1 and 2 or their equivalent are prerequisite for 
all other courses in Botany except Bacteriology (Botany 41). 

Courses for Undergraduates. 

1. General Botany. (4 Hrs.) Two lecture periods and two 
three-hour laboratory periods each week. 

First semester; T., Th., 8:00 or M. F., 9:00; T., Th., 2:00; M., 
F., 2:00; or W., 2:00 and S., 9:00. Professor Strausbaugh, Miss 
Ammons and Mr. Barclay. 313 O. H. __ 

2. General Botany. (4 Hrs.) A continuation of Course 1. 
Second semester; lecture periods and laboratory sections as in 

Course 1. Professor Strausbaugh, Miss Ammons and Mr. Barclay. 
313 O. H. 

4. Systematic Botany. (3 Hrs.) 

Second semester; M., F., 10:00; laboratory and field hours to 
be arranged. Professor Strausbaugh. 311 O. H. 

6. Pharmaceutical Botany. (4 Hrs.) For pharmacy students. 
Two lecture periods and two three-hour laboratory periods each week. 

Second semester; M., F., 10:00; T., Th,. 9:00. Mr. Rhine. 313 
O. H. 

11. (Ill) Morphology and Phylogeny. (4 Hrs.) (22.) 

First semester; lectures, T., Th., 9:00; laboratory, M., F., 2:00. 
Associate Professor Spangler. 313 O. H. 

12. (112) Morphology and Phylogeny. (4 Hrs.) A continua- 
tion of Course II. (23.) 

Second semester; lecture and laboratory periods as in Course II. 
Associate Professor Spangler. 313 O. H. 

14. (114) Microtechnique and Plant Histology. (2 Hrs.) (35.) 
Second semester; W., 2:00 and S., 8:00. Professor Strausbaugh 
and Associate Professor Spangler. 307 O. H. 

21. Plant Physiology. (5 Hrs.) Three lecture periods and two 
three-hour laboratory periods each week. (12.) 

First semester; M., W., F., 11:00; M., W., 2:00. Mr. Rhine. 
313 O. H. 



110 West Virginia University 

22. (122) Advanced Plant Physiology. (5 Hrs.) Three lecture 
periods and two three-hour laboratory periods each week. Prerequi- 
sites: Botany 21; also courses in General Physics and Organic Chem- 
istry. (16.) 

Second semester; M., W., F., 11:00; M., W., 2:00. Mr. Rhine. 
313 O. H. 

31. Plant Ecology. (4 Hrs.) (32.) 

First semester; T., Th., 9:00; T., Th., 2:00. Professor Straus- 
baugh. 313 O. H. 

32. (132) Forest Ecology. (4 Hrs.) Prerequisite: Botany 21 
or Botany 31. Laboratory work mainly field study. (33.) 

Second semester;- T., Th., 9:00; laboratory hours to be arranged. 
Professor Strausbaugh. 313 O. H. 

34. (134). Experimental Ecology. (4 Hrs.) 

Second semester; T., Th., 10:00; T., Th., 2:00. Professor 
Strausbaugh. 313 O. H. 

41. Bateriology. (3 Hrs.) Two lecture periods and one three- 
hour laboratory period each week. (10). 

First and second semesters; lectures T., Th., 11:00; laboratory 
T., or W., or Th., 2:00. Associate Professor Spangler, 313 O. H. 

Courses open to Graduates. 

51, (151). History of Botany. (2 Hrs.) 

First semester; M., F., 10:00. Professor Strausbaugh, 313 O. H. 

53, (153). Botany Seminar. (1 Hr.) For juniors and seniors 
who have chosen botany as their major subject. (36). 

First semester; M., 4:00. Professor Strausbaugh and staff, 313 
O. H. 

54, (154). Botany Seminar. (1 Hr.) Prerequisite: Botany 53. 
(37). 

Second semester; M., 4:00. Professor Strausbaugh and staff, 
313 O. H. 

165. Morphological Studies. (4 Hrs.) 

First semester ;hours to be arranged. 

Professor Strausbaugh and Associate Professor Spangler, 309 
O. H. 

166. Morphological Studies. (4 Hrs.) 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. 

Professor Strausbaugh and Associate Professor Spangler, 309 
0. H. 



The College of Arts and Sciences HI 

171. Problems in Plant Physiology. (1-5 Hrs.) 

First semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Strausbaugh 
and Mr. Rhine, 307 O. H. 

172. Problems in Plant Physiology. (1-5 Hrs.) 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Strausbaugh 
and Mr. Rhine, 307 O. H. 

173. Microchemistry of Plant Tissues. (4 Hrs.) 

First semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Strausbaugh 
and Mr. Rhine, 307 0. H. 

181. Problems in Plant Ecology. (4 Hrs.) 

First semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Strausbaugh, 
313 0. H. 

182. Problems in Plant Ecology. (4 Hrs.) 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Strausbaugh, 
313 O. H. 

191. Research. (1-5 Hrs.) 

First semester; hours to be arranged. Botany staff, 307 O. H. 

192. Research. (1-5 Hrs.) 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. Botany Staff, 307 O. H. 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING. 

Courses 171 and 172 in metallurgy of iron and steel in the De- 
partment of Engineering are included in the list of Engineering sub- 
jects from which not to exceed 15 hours may be selected for credit in 
the College of Arts and Sciences. See announcements of the College 
of Engineering. 

CHEMISTRY. 

Professors Clark, Jacobson, and Morris; Associate Professors 
Hubert Hill, Davies, and Smithey; Assistant Professors Deatrick 
and Dustman; Mr. Turner, Mr. Swan, Mr. Garland, Mr. Collett. 

NOTE : Courses 1 and 2 are prerequisite to all courses in chem- 
istry. Courses 5, 6, 7, 33, and 60 are required of students whose 
major is chemistry. Exceptions are sometimes made for students 
who expect subsequently to study medicine. 

NOTE: For courses in physiological and pharmaceutical chem- 
istry see the announcements of the School of Medicine. 

1. Inorganic Chemistry. (4 Hrs.) Three recitation periods and 
two two-hour laboratory periods weekly. 

Section A, for students who offer chemistry for entrance credit. 



112 West Virginia University 

'Section B, for students who do not offer chemistry for entrance 
credit. 

First and. second semesters; hours as announced in the semester 
schedule. Professor Clark and staff. 

2. Inorganic Chemistry. (4 Hrs.) Sections and recitation hours 
arranged as in Course 1. 

Professor Clark and staff. 

Second semester; hours as announced in semester schedule. Pro- 
fessor Clark and staff. 

3, (4). Quantitative Analysis. (2 Hrs.) Primarily for engineer- 
ing students. Two laboratory periods weekly. 

First semester; hours as shown on semester schedule. Associate 
Professor Davies, 1 S. 

5. Qualitative Analysis and Inorganic Preparations. (4 Hrs.) 

Required of students whose major is chemistry, of students in chemi- 
cal engineering, and of candidates for the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Public Health. Three three-hour laboratory periods weekly 
with recitations M. and W. and assignments in addition. 

First semester; M., W., F., 2:00. Associate Professor Hubert 
Hill, 37 S. 

6. Quantitative Analysis. (2 to 5 Hrs.) Required of students 
whose major is chemistry, and of students in chemical and mining 
engineering, and of candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Public Health. Students registered for the coal mining option will 
take only four hours' credit. Prerequisite: Course 5. Two to five 
three-hour laboratory periods weekly. 

Second semester; 2:00. Associate Professor Hubert Hill, 37 S. 

7, (107). Quantitative Analysis. (2 to 4 Hrs.) A continuation 
of Course 6. Required of students whose major is chemistry and of 
students in chemical engineering. Prerequisites: Physics 1, 2, 3, 
and 4; Mathematics 25 and 26. Four three-hour laboratory periods 
weekly. (7). 

First semester; M., T., Th., F., 2:00. Professor Jacobson, 35 S. 

8, (108). Quantitative Analysis. (2 to 5 Hrs.) An advanced 
course for major students. Prerequisite: course 7. Five three-hour 
laboratory periods weekly. (8). 

Second semester; 2:00. Professor Jacobson, 35 S. 

10. Quantitative Analysis. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisite: course 2. A 
general course for agricultural students. (35). 
Second semester; M., T., Th., F., 2:00-5:00. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 113 

11, (111). Synthetic Inorganic Chemistry. (3 Hrs.) For juniors, 
seniors, and graduates. Prerequisite: course 7. One lecture and two 
three-hour laboratory periods weekly. 

First semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Morris. 

13, (113). Quantitative Analysis. (3 Hrs.) Open to seniors and 
graduate students. Prerequisites: courses 7 and 20. 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Morris, 35 S. 

14, (114). Organic Qualitative Analysis. (2 Hrs.) Open to 
seniors and graduate students. Prerequisite: course 33. Two three- 
hour laboratory periods weekly. 

Second semester; M., F., 2:00-5:00. Professor Jacobson, 25 S. 

15, Quantitative Analysis. (3 Hrs.) For students in premedical 
courses. (18). 

First semester; M., F., 9:00-12:00; W., 9:00-10:00, 11:00-12:00, 
or T., Th., 2:00-5:00; S., 9:00-12:00. Associate Professor Hill and 
Mr. Swan. 

16, (116). Organic Quantitative Analysis. (2 Hrs.) Open to 
seniors and graduate students. Prerequisite or parallel course: Chem- 
istry 20. Two three-hour laboratory periods weekly. (23). 

Second semester; W., 2:00-5:00; S., 9:00-12:00. Associate Pro- 
fessor Smithey and Mr. Garland, 31 S. 

18. Dairy Chemistry. (3 Hrs.) For students in the College of 
Agriculture. Prerequisite: course 2. (36). 

Second semester; T., Th., 2:00-5:00; lecture hour to be arranged. 
Mr. Dustman, 31 S. 

19, 20. Chemical Calculations. (1 Hr.) Recommended for all 
students who plan to complete more than one year of chemistry. 

Both semesters; W., 8:00. Mr. Swan and Mr. Collett. 

22, (122). Food Analysis. (3 Hrs.) Primarily for agriculture 
and home economics students. One lecture and two three-hour lab- 
oratory periods weekly. 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. 

Organic Chemistry. 

30. Organic Chemistry. A cultural introductory course for stu- 
dents not majoring in chemistry. Admission; permission of instruc- 
tor. Prerequisite: Chemistry 1. (3). 

Second semester; T., Th., 9:00. Professor Jacobson, 20 S. 



114 West Virginia University 

31. Organic Chemistry. (4 Hrs.) For students in agriculture 
and home economics. Three recitations and one three-hour laboratory 
period weekly! Prerequisite: Chemistry 2. (16). 

First semester; T., Th., S., 9:00; W., or F., 2:00. Mr. Dustman, 
20 S. 

33, (133). Organic Chemistry. (5 Hrs.) Eequired of students 
with major in chemistry, of students in chemical and mining engin- 
eering, and of candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science in. 
Public Health. The course may count also as graduate work for stu- 
dents from other colleges who have done a proportionate amount of 
work in other branches of chemistry. Three lectures and two three- 
hour laboratory periods weekly. Prerequisite : Course 7 ; for engi- 
neering students, Course 6. (9). 

First semester; M., W., F., 11:00; T., Th., 2:00. Professor 
Clark, Associate Professor Smithey, and Mr. Garland, 16 M. H. and 
33 S. 

36, Organic Chemistry. (6 Hrs.) Required of premedical and 
pharmacy students. (12.) 

Second semester; M., W., F., S., 11:00; T., Th., 9:00-12:00, 2:00- 
5:00. Associate Professor Smithey and Mr. Garland, 16 M. H. and 
33 S. 

37, Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis. (5 Hrs.) For phar- 
macy students. (33.) 

First semester; M., T., Th., F., 9:00-12:00; W., 9:00-10:00, 11:00- 
12:00. Associate Professor Hill, 37 S. 

38, (138). Organic Chemistry. (5 Hrs.) Open to seniors and 
graduate students. Two lectures and three three-hour laboratory 
periods weekly. Prerequisite: Course 33. (20.) 

Second semester; T., Th., 11:00; M., W., F., 2:00-5:00. Professor 
Clark, Associate Professor Smithey, and Mr. Garland, 11 S. and 33 
S. 

39, (139). Dyes and Dye Intermediates. (2 or 4 Hrs.) Open to 

graduate students; seniors only by consent. Prerequisite: Course 
38. (24.) 

First semester; T., Th., 9:00; laboratory T., Th., 2:00-5:00. 
Professor Clark, 11 S. 

40, (140). Dyes and Dye Intermediates. (2 or 4 Hrs.) Open 

only to graduate students. Prerequisite: Course 39. (25.) 

Second semester; 9:00; laboratory, T., Th., 2:00-5:00. Professor 
Clark, US. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 115 

Industrial Chemistry. 

51, (151). Industrial Chemistry. (2 Hrs.) For senior chemis- 
try majors and graduate students. (19). 

First semester; M., F., 9:00. Professor Clark, 11 S. 

(Eng'g. 182.) Industrial Chemistry Laboratory. (2 Hrs.) For 

senior chemistry majors and graduate students. 

First semester; T., Th., 9:00-12:00. Professor Hodge and Mr. 

KOHLER, M. H. 

52, (152). Industrial Chemistry. (2. or 4 Hrs.) For senior 
chemistry majors and graduate students. (22.) 

Second semester; W., F., 9:00. Professor Clark, 11 S. 

Physical Chemistry. 

60, (160). Physical Chemistry. (5 Hrs.) Required of chemistry 
and chemical engineering students. Open to graduate students. Pre- 
requisites: Chemistry 33 and Physics 4. Three lecture and two three- 
hour laboratory periods weekly. (21.) 

Second semester; M., W., F., 9:00; T., Th., 2:00-5:00. Associate 
Professor Davies, 1 S. 

62, (162). The Chemistry of Colloids. (2 or 4 Hrs.) Open to 
juniors, seniors, and graduate students. Specially recommended to 
medical students. Two lecture and two three-hour laboratory pe- 
riods. (26.) 

Second semester; T., Th., 8:00; M., F., 2:00-5:00. Associate 
Professor Davies, 1 S. 

63. Physical Chemistry. (2 Hrs.) ..Required of pre-medical stu- 
dents and of candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pub- 
lic Health. Two lectures or recitations weekly. (32.) 

First semester; T., Th., 11:00. Associate Professor Davies, 12 S. 

65. Physical Chemistry. (1 Hr.) Elective for pre-medical stu- 
dents. Arranged to accompany Chemistry 63. (37.) 

First semester; W. or F., 2:00-4:00; Associate Professor Davies, 
1 S. 

74, (174). History of Chemistry. (2 Hrs.) For seniors and gradu- 
ates. Juniors may be admitted with the consent of the instructor. 
(31.) 

Second semester; T., Th., 9:00. Associate Professor Hill. 

180. Electrochemistry. (3 Hrs.) Electrolytic dispositions of 
metals; application of oxidation and reduction cells as applied to syn- 



116 West Virginia University 

theses. One lecture and two three-hour laboratory periods. For 
graduate students. Prerequisites: Chemistry 38, 60, 7 and Physics 3. 

Second semester; hours as announced in semester schedule. Pro- 
fessor , 35 S. 

182. Qualitative Analysis. (2 Hrs.) An advanced course', in- 
cluding: the rare elements. 

Second semester; T., Th., 9:00-12:00. Associate Professor Hill, 
37 S. 

183. Physical Chemistry. (5 Hrs.) An elective course for 
graduate students. Prerequisite: Chemistry 60. (34.) 

First semester; hours to be arranged. Associate Professor 
Davies, 1 S. 

Research. 

185, 187. Research. (Credits as arranged.) (27.) 
First semester; hours as arranged. Chemistry Staff. 

186, 188. Research. (Credits as arranged.) (28.) 
Second semester; hours to be arranged. Chemistry Staff. 

189, 191. Journal Meeting and Seminar. (1 Hr.) Primarily for 
graduate students. Seniors only by consent. (29.) 

First semester; M., 8:00. Professor Clark and staff, 11 S. 

190, 192. Journal Meeting and Seminar. (1 Hr.) Primarily for 
graduate students. Seniors only by consent. (30.) 

Second semester; M., 8:00. Professor Clark and staff. 

Special Work. Assignments for advanced and graduate students, 
not covered by courses already outlined. Credits and schedules to be 
arranged. 

NOTE — A breakage deposit is required of all students taking lab- 
oratory courses. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 117 

ECONOMICS, BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION, AND SOCIOLOGY 

Professors Vickers, Rufener, Harris, Assistant Professors King, 
McGarry, Saposnekow, Mr. Fields, and 

Economics 1 and 2 will be helpful to students in all other courses 
in the department, and are specified prerequisites for entrance to 
most of these courses. Economics 5 and 6 may be taken by fresh- 
men, and they have no prerequisites. With the exception of these 
two courses, Economics 1 and 2 should be taken first by all students 
who contemplate further work in economics and sociology. Courses 
in sociology should be deferred till the sophomore year. Sociology 
1 is a prerequisite for all other courses in sociology. 

Any -student who elects economics or sociology as a major sub- 
ject must take at least 25 hours of work in this department, at least 
6 hours in history and politics, and should take at least 4 hours in 
either zoology or botany in order to qualify as a candidate for a de- 
gree. In anticipation of such election, freshmen are urged as far as 
practicable to meet requirements in English, foreign language and 
science groups during their freshman year. Economics 1 and 2 may 
with advantage to the student be deferred until the second, or sopho- 
more year. 

Economics. 

1. Principles of Economics. (3 Hrs.) For sophomores; fresh- 
men by consent. Designed to be followed by Economics 2. 

First semester; sections, M., W., F., 8:00; M., W., F., 9:00; T., 
Th., S., 9:00; M., W., F., 11:00; M., W., F., 3:00. Professor Vickers, 
Professor Rufener, Mr. Fields. 

Second semester; M., W., F., -. 

2. Principles of Economics. (3 Hrs.) A continuation of pre- 
ceding course. Prerequisite: Economics 1. 

Second semester; sections, M., W., F., 8:00; M., W., F., 9:00; T., 
Th., S., 9:00; M., W., P., 11:00; M., W., F., 3:00. Professor Vickers, 
Professor Rufener, Mr. Fields. 

First semester; M., W., F. . 

3. Principles of Economics. (3 Hrs.) For students in the Col- 
lege of Engineering. (115.) 

First semester; first section, T., Th., S., 8:00; second section, M., 
M., F., 11:00; , . 



5. Commercial Geography. (3 Hrs.) For freshmen and sopho- 
mores. (24.) 

First semester; M., W., F., 8:00. Mr. Fields. 



118 West Virginia University 

6. Essentials of Economic Organization. (3 Hrs.) Primarily 
for freshmen* A student having already credit for Economics 1 may 
not receive credit for this course. 

Second semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Mr. Fields. 

10, Money, Credit and Banking. (2 Hrs.) For students in the 
College of Engineering. Prerequisite: Economics 3. (105.) 

Second semester; sections, T., Th., 8:00; T., Th., 11:00; Pro- 
fessor RUFENER, 27 W. 

11, (111). Money, Credit and Banking. (3 Hrs.) For juniors 
and seniors; graduates as a minor. Prerequisites: Economics 1 and 
2. (5.) 

First semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Professor Vickers, 27 W. 

12, (112). Public Finance. (4 Hrs.) For juniors and seniors; 

graduates as a minor. Prerequisites: Economics 1 and 2. (6.) 

Second semester; M., T., Th., F., 10:00. Professor Vickers, 27 W. 

13, (113). Business Organization. (3 Hrs.) For juniors and 
seniors. Prerequisite: Economics 1 and 2. (7). 

First semester; T., Th., S., 9:00. Professor Rufener, 42 W. 

14, (114). Business Finance. (2 Hrs.) For juniors and seniors. 
Prerequisite: Economics 11. (20.) 

Second semester; T., Th., 9:00. Professor Rufener, 27 W. 

15, (115). Investment and Speculation. (2 Hrs.) For juniors 
and seniors. Prerequisites: Economics 11, 13, and 14. (21.) 

First semester; T., Th., 11:00. Professor Rufener, 42 W. 

31. Statistics. (3 Hrs.) ..For juniors and seniors. Prerequi- 
sites: Economics 1 and 2. (18.) 

First semester; T., Th., 11:00; two-hour laboratory period to 
be arranged. . 

33. Insurance. (2 Hrs.) For juniors and seniors. (22.) 
First semester; M., F., 10:00. . 



36, (136). Business Forecasting. (2 Hrs.) For juniors and 
seniors. Prerequisites: Economics 11, 13, and 31. (19.) 

Second semester; T., Th., 2:00. Professor Rufener, 42 W 

40, (140). Labor Problems. (3 Hrs.) For juniors and seniors; 
graduates by consent. Prerequisites: Economics 1 and 2. (11.) 
Second semester; M., W., F., 11:00. Professor Vickers, 42 W. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 119 

41, (141). Railroad Transportation. (3 Hrs.) For juniors and 
seniors. Prerequisites: Economics 1 and 2. (7.) 

First semester; M., W., F., 8:00. Professor Rufener, 44 W. 

45, (145). International Trade Policies. (3 Hrs.) For juniors 
and seniors. Prerequisites: Economics 1 and 2. (10). 

First semester; M., W., F., 11:00. Mr. Fields. 

46, (146). Foreign Trade Methods. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisite: 
Economics 45. 

Second semester; T., Th., S., 8:00. Mr. Fields. 

47, (147). Economic Development, with special reference to the 
U. S. (3 Hrs.) For juniors and seniors. Prerequisite: Economics 
1 and 2. 

First semester, T., Th., S., 10:00. Mr. Fields. 

51, (151). History of Economic Doctrines. (2 Hrs.) For juniors 
and seniors; graduates by consent. Prerequisites: Economics 1 and 2. 
(3.) 

First semester; T., Th., 9:00. Professor Vickers, 28 W. 

52, (152). Relations of Government to Economic Enterprise. 

(2 Hrs.) For seniors and graduates, juniors by consent. Prerequi- 
site: Consent of instructor. 

Second semester; T., Th., 9:00. Professor Vickers, 42 W. 

54, (154). Economic Principles in Practice... (2 Hrs.) For 

seniors and graduates. A problem course conducted by the case 
method. Prerequiistes: Economics 11 and 13 and two other advanced 
courses in ecnomics. 

Second semester; M., F., 10:00. Professor Rufener, 28 W. 

55, (155). Distribution of Wealth. (2 Hrs.) For seniors and 
graduates. Prerequisites: Economics 51 and at least two other ad- 
vanced courses. (14). 

First semester; T., Th., 8:00. Professor Vickers, 28 W. 

56, (156). Seminar. Special problems in Economics. For sen- 
iors and graduates. Prerequisites: At least three advanced courses 
in Economics. Credit 2 to 4 hours. 

Second semester; T., and Th., 9:00. Professor Vickers, 28 W. 



120 West Virginia University 

Business Administration. 

1. Principles of Accounting. (3 Hrs.) For freshmen and soph- 
omores. (25). 

First semester; T., Th., 9:00; laboratory, W., 2:00-5:00. Assist- 
ant Professor King. 1 W. 

Second semester; T., Th., 11:00; laboratory, T., 2:00-5:00. As- 
sistant Professor King. 1 W. 

2. Principles of Accounting. (3 Hrs.) For freshmen and soph- 
omores. Continuation of Business 1. (26). 

Second semester; T., Th., 9:00; laboratory, T., 2:00-5:00. Assist- 
ant Professor King. 1. W. 

3. Industrial Accounting. (3 Hrs.) For juniors and seniors. 
Prerequisite: Business 1. (27). 

First semester; T., Th., 11:00; laboratory, M., 2:00-5:00. As- 
sistant Professor King. 1 W. 

4. Cost Accounting. (2 Hrs.) For seniors in the College of 
Engineering. (125). 

Second semester; first section, M., 10:00; laboratory, W., 2:00- 
5:00; second section, F., 10:00; laboratory, M., 2:00-5:00. Assistant 
Professor King. 1 W. 

5. Advanced Accounting. (3 Hrs.) Designed to follow Business 
2. (28). 

First semester; T., Th., 10:00; laboratory, M., 2:00-5:00. As- 
sistant Professor King. 1 W. 

6. Accounting Problems. (3 Hrs.) Designed to follow Business 
5. (29). 

Second semester; T., Th., 10:00; laboratory, Th., 2:00-5:00. As- 
sistant Professor King. 1 W. 

7. Auditing. (3 Hrs.) For juniors and seniors. Prerequisite: 
Business 5. 

Second semester; M., F., 9:00; laboratory, Th., 2:00-5:00. As- 
sistant Professor King. 1 W. 

21. Marketing Methods. (3 Hrs.) For juniors and seniors. 
Prerequisite: Economics 1 and 2. (40). 

First semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Assistant Professor McGarry. 
44 W. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 121 

22. Marketing Problems. (3 Hrs.) For juniors and seniors. Pre- 
requisite:' Business 21. (41). 

Second semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Assistant Professor McGarry. 
44 W. 

25. Advertising. (3 Hrs.) For juniors and seniors. Prerequi- 
site: Business 22. (44). 

First semester; T , Th., 9:00; a third hour to be arranged. As- 
sistant Professor McGarry. 44 W. 

26. Retail Store Management. (3 Hrs.) For juniors and sen- 
iors. Prerequisite: Business 22. (42). 

Second semester; T., Th., S., 8:00. Assistant Professor Mc- 
Garry. 42 W. 

31. Business Management. (3 Hrs.) For juniors and seniors. 
Prerequisites: Economics 1, 2, and 13. (52). 

First semester; M., W., F., 11:00. Assistant Professar McGarry. 

32. Industrial Management. (3 Hrs.) For juniors and seniors. 
Prerequisite: Business 31. (Omitted 1925-26). (53). 

Second semester; M., W., F., 8:00. Assistant Professor McGarry. 
44 W. 

41. Business Law. (3 Hrs.) For juniors and seniors. Not open 
to students preparing for a law degree. Prerequisites: Economics 
land- 21. (46). 

First semrster; T., Th., 11:00; and F., 1:00. Assistant Professor 
McGarry. 42 W. 

42. Business Law. (3 Hrs.) For juniors and seniors. Not open 
to students preparing for a law degree. Prerequisite: Business 41. 
(47). 

Second semester; T., Th., 11:00; and F., 1:00. Assistant Pro- 
fessor McGarry. 42 W. 

46. Business Problems. (3 Hrs.) For seniors. Prerequisites: 
Economics 13 and Business 22. (48). 

Second semester; M., W., F., 11:00. Assistant Professor Mc- 
Garry. 

Sociology. 

1. Principles of Sociology. (3 Hrs.) For sophomores and 
juniors. 

First seme'ter; sections, M., W., F., 8:00; M., W., F., 11:00; 



122 West Virginia University 

M., ,W., F., 2:00; T., Th., S., 10:00. Professor Harris and Assistant 
Professor Saposnekow. 

Second semester; M., W., F., 2:00. Assistant Professor Saposne- 
kow. 

2. The Social Settlement in the United States and England. 

(3 Hrs.) For sophomores and juniors. Prerequisite: Sociology 1. 

(11). 

Second semester; M., W., F., 11:00. Assistant Professor Saposne- 
kow. 

4. Rural {Sociology. (3 Hrs.) For sophomores and juniors. Pre- 
requisite: Sociology 1. (10). 

Second semester; M., W., F., 2:00. Professor Harris. 

6. Scientific Philanthropy. (2 Hrs.) For sophomores and 
juniors. Prerequisite: Sociology 1. (13). 

Second semester; T., Th., 10:00. Assistant Professor Saposne- 
kow. 

8. Problems of Child Welfare. (2 Hrs.) For sophomores and 
juniors. Prerequisite: Sociology 1. (8). 

Second semester; T., Th., 9:00. Professor Harris. 

9. Organized Play and Recreation. (2 Hrs.) For juniors and 
seniors. Prerequisite: Five hours of sociology. (14). 

First semester; M., F., 10:00. Assistant Professor Saposnekow. 

10. The Family. (3 Hrs.) For juniors and seniors. Prerequi- 
site: Sociology 1. (3). 

Second semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Professor Harris. 

31, (131). Race Problems. (2 Hrs.) For juniors and seniors; 
graduates by consent. Prerequisite: Sociology 1. (9). 
First semester; T., Th., 9:00. Professor Harris. 

33, (133). Crime and Punishment. (2 Hrs.) For juniors and 
seniors; graduates by consent. Prerequisite: Sociology 1. (12). 
First semester; T., Th., 10:00. Assistant Professor Saposnekow. 

41, (141). Social Organization. (3 Hrs.) For seniors and 
graduates; juniors by consent. Prerequisites: Sociology 1 and 2. (2). 

First semester; M., W., F., 8:00. Professor Harris. 

42, (142). Theories of Social Progress. (3 Hrs.) For seniors 
and graduates; juniors by consent. Prerequisites: Sociology 1 and 2. 
(4). 

Second semester; M., W., F., 8:00. Professor Harris. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 123 

44, (144). Social Investigation. (3 Hrs.) For seniors and gradu- 
ates; juniors by consent. Prerequisites: eight hours of sociology and 
three hours of economics. (7). 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Harris. 



46, (146). History of Social Thought. <2 Hrs.) For seniors and 
graduates. Prerequisites: Eight hours of sociology and six hours 
of economics. (15). 

Second semester; M., F., 10:00. Assistant Professor Saposnekow. 



47, (147). Seminar. (1 Hr.) For seniors and graduates. A 

critical study of the current literature of sociology. Prerequisites: 

Nine hours of sociology and three hours of economics. (16). 

First semester; Th., 4:00. Professor Harris. 



48, (148). Seminar. (1 Hr.) For seniors and graduates. Con- 
tinuation of Course 47. Prerequisite: Sociology 47. 

Second semester; Th., 4:00. Professor Harris. 



EDUCATION 

Professors Deahl, Cavins, L. B. Hill, Associate Professors Humph- 
reys, Pollock, Roberts and Assistant Professor Richmond. 

The courses offered in this department aim to contribute to the 
educational influence and to the professional efficiency of the schools 
of the state in the following ways: (1) to interest those students 
who study the science of education as a part of their general educa- 
tion. (2) To afford students who wish to teach for a time after gradu- 
ation the means of professional training commensurate with their 
academic training. (3) To furnish appropriate professional educa- 
tion to students, and to any experienced teachers of suitable age and 
attainments, who may desire to fit themselves to be teachers, princi- 
pals, or superintendents of schools. 

Students who take education as their major and who expect to 
do administrative and supervisory school work should take college 
courses representing a wide range of subjects taught in the public 
schools. 

Those who are preparing to teach academic subjects should fit 
-hem selves to give instruction in as m&ny as three subjects. 



124 West Virginia University 

All 'students whose major is education should so plan their work 
that the afternoons in their senior year may be open for practice 
teaching-, or for supervisory work, or for experimental work in edu- 
cation. 

NOTE — 'Courses in Education are open only to juniors and seniors 
and graduate students, except that Education 1 and 4 are open to 
freshmen and sophomores. 

NOTE — For other announcements of the Department of Educa- 
tion see catalogue, page 49. 

1. Principles of Learning and Studying. (3 Hrs.) Open to fresh- 
men and sophomores. (17). 

First semester; M., F., 10:00; third hour to be arranged. Pro- 
fessor Hill, 17 W., and Associate Professor Humphreys, 16 W. 

4. Educational Psychology. (3 Hrs.) Open to freshmen and 
sophomores. (12). 

Second semester; M., F., 10:00; third hour to be arranged. Pro- 
fessor Deahl, 18 W., and Associate Professor Humphreys, 17 W. 

7. Philosophy of Education. (3 Hrs.) Open to juniors and 
seniors. (4). 

First semester; M., W., F., 11:00. Professor Deahl. 18 W. 

10. Educational Sociology. (3 Hrs.) Open to juniors and seniors. 
(5). 

Second semester; M., W., F., 11:00. Professor Deahl, 18 W. 

13. Educational Tests and Measurements. (2 Hrs.) Open to 
juniors and seniors. (30). 

First semester; M., W., F., 10:00. Professor Cavins. 

16. History of Education. (2 Hrs.) Open to juniors and seniors. 
(2). 

Second semester; T., Th., 8:00. Assistant Professor Humph- 
reys, 17 W. 

19. High School and Secondary Education. (3 Hrs.) Open to 
juniors and seniors. (14). 

First semester; M., W., F., 11:00. Professor Roberts, 16 W. 

22. The Junior High School. (2 Hrs.) Open to juniors and 
seniors. (32 ) . 

First semester; T., Th., hours to be arranged. Professor Roberts. 

25, (125). Educational Psychology. (3 Hrs.) Open to juniors 
seniors and graduate students. (23). 

First semester; M., W., T>, 9:00. Professor Hill, 17 W. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 125 

27, (127). Experimental Education. (3 Hrs.) Open to juniors, 
seniors and graduate students. 

First semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Professor Cavins, 16 W. 

30, (130). Statistical Methods Applied to Education. (3 Hrs.) 

Open to juniors, seniors and graduate students. (26). 

Second semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Professor Cavins,' 16 W. 

32, (132). Tests and Measurements of General Intelligence. (2 to 
4 Hrs.) Open to juniors, seniors and graduate students. (20). 
Second semester; T., Th., 4:00. Professor Deahl, 18 W. 

34, (134). Problems in Secondary Education. (2 Hrs.) Open to 
juniors, seniors and graduate students. (28). 

Second semester; T., Th., 8:00. Professor Roberts. 

37, (137). Secondary School Program of Studies. (3 Hrs.) 

Open to juniors, seniors and graduate students. (44). 

Semester and hours to be arranged. Professor Roberts. 

41, (141). Teaching of English in the Secondary Schools. (2 

Hrs.) Open to juniors, seniors and graduate students. 

Second semester; T., Th., 9:00. Assistant Professor . 

44, (144). Principles of Teaching. (3 Hrs.) Open to juniors, 
seniors and graduate students. (10). 

First semester; sections, M., W., F., 8:00 and 9:00. 

Second semester; sections, M., W., F., 8:00 and 11:00. Associate 
Professors Humphreys and Pollock, 18 W. and 17 W. 

50, (150). Seminar in Directed Teaching. (1-3 Hrs.) Open to 

seniors and graduate students. (24). 

First or second semester; hours to be arranged. Staff. 

48, (148). Directed Teaching. (3 Hrs.) Open to seniors and' 
graduate students. (22). 

First and second semesters; T., Th., 11:00. Staff; 2:00 to 4:00. 

55, (155). Supervision of Learning and Teaching. (3 Hrs.) 
Open to seniors and graduates. (11). 

First semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Professor Deahl, 18 W. 

60, (160). Seminar in Supervision of Instruction. (3 Hrs.) 
Open to juniors, seniors and graduate students. (38). 

Second semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Professor Deahl, 18 W. 

63, (163). School Administration and Supervision. (2 Hrs.) 
Ope i to seniors and graduate students. (6). 

First semester; T., Th., 2:00. Professor Deahl, 18 W. 



126 West Virginia University 

64, (164). School Administration and Supervision. (2 Hrs.) 
Open to seniors and graduates. (7). 

Second semester; T., Th., 4:00. Professor Roberts, 16 W. 

68, (168). (Supervision of Rural Schools. (2 or 3 Hrs.) Open to 
juniors, seniors and 'graduate students. (15). 

Second semester; T., Th., 2:00. Professor Hill, 17 W. 

70, (170). Seminar in Educational Psychology. (2 or 3 Hrs.) 

Open to juniors, seniors and graduate students. (41). 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Cavins. 

74, (174). Psychology of Reading. (2 Hrs.) Open to juniors, 
seniors and graduate students. (43). 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Cavins. 

76, (176). Seminar in Educational Sociology. (3 Hrs.) Open to 
juniors, seniors and graduate students. (39). 

Second semester; T., Th., 2:00. Professor Deahl, 18 W. 

77, (177). Mental and Physical Measures and Tests. (2 to 4 
Hrs.) Open to juniors, seniors and graduate students. (42). 

First semester; T., Th., 4:00. Professor Deahl, 18 W. 

78, (178). Construction and Use of Standard Tests. (2 Hrs.) 
Open to juniors, seniors and graduate students. (31). 

Second semester; T., Th., 10:00. Professor Cavins, 16 W. 

82, (182). History of Education. (2 Hrs.) Open to seniors 
and graduate students. (1). 

Second semester; T., Th., 8:00. Assistant Professor Humph- 
reys, 17 W. 

83, (183). Seminar in Domestic and Foreign School Systems. 

(2 Hrs.) Open to seniors and graduates. (8 and 9). 

Second semester; T., Th., 11:00. Professor Hill, 17 W. 

86, (186). iSeminiar in Normal School Problems. (2 Hrs.) Open 
to seniors and graduate students. (25). 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Hill, 17 W. 

88, (188). Public School Programs of Studies. (3 Hrs.) Open 

to seniors and graduate students. (13). 

Second semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Professor . 

91, (191). School Curricula. Seminar. (2-4 Hrs.) Open to 

seniors and graduate students. (45). 

First and second semesters; hours to be arranged. Professor 
Hill, 18 W. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 12? 

95, (195). Educational Surveys. (2 Hrs.) Open to seniors and 
graduates. 

First semester; T., Th., 9:00. Professor Cavins. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Courses 50, 56, 66, 560 and 600 in Electrical Engineering are in- 
cluded in the list of Engineering subjects from which not to exceed 
15 hours may be selected for credit in the College of Arts and Sciences. 
See announcements of the College of Engineering. 

ENGLISH 

Professors Armstrong, Cox, Barbe, and Johnson, Associate Profes- 
sor Reed, Assistant Professor Farris, Mrs. Reed, Miss Lytle, 
Miss Sayre, Mr. Chappell, Mr. Molitor, and 
Mrs. Pettigrew. 

NOTE : All advanced courses in the English department must 
be preceded by freshman English, courses 1, 2,. 26, and 27, unless 
specific exceptions are stated in the announcements. Students from 
colleges that do not require English 26 and 27 will be admitted to 
certain advanced courses in composition on the completion of English 
1 and 2. 

Courses for Freshmen. 

1. Composition and Rhetoric. (3 Hrs.) Primarily for freshmen. 
Required of all candidates for the bachelor's degree in all the colleges. 

First semester; hours as announced in the semester schedule; 
Professor Johnson and staff. 

Second semester; hours as announced in the semester schedule; 
Professor Johnson and staff. 

2. Composition and Rhetoric. (3 Hrs.) Primarily for freshmen. 
Required of all candidates for the bachelor's degree in all the colleges. 
A continuation of Course 1. Prerequisite: English 1. 

Second semester; hours as announced in the semester schedule; 
Professor Johnson and staff. 

First semester; hours as announced in the semester schedule; 
Professor Johnson and staff. 

NOTE: Students will not be continued in English 1 or 2 whose 
work during the first three weeks shows marked deficiency in spell- 
ing, punctuation, grammar, sentence structure, or paragraphing. 

Engineering and agricultural students will be assigned as far as 
possible to special sections in freshman composition. 



128 West Virginia University 

3. General Survey of English Literature. (2 Hrs.) Primarily 
for freshmen. Required of candidates for degrees in the College of 
Arts and Sciences and in the College of Agriculture. Historical view 
of English literature from its beginnings to the eighteenth century 
with a close study of a few classics. (26). 

Both semesters; hours as announced in the semester schedule; 
Professor Armstrong and staff. 

4. General Survey of English Literature. (2 Hrs.) Primarily 
for freshmen. Required of candidates for degrees in the College of 
Arts and Sciences and in the College of Agriculture. A continuation 
of English 3. English literature in the eighteenth and nineteenth 
centuries. (27). 

Second semester; hours as announced in the semester schedule; 
Professor Armstrong and staff. 

NOTE : Students are expected to take Courses 3 and 4 in con- 
nection with English 1 and 2, in order to make up five hours of fresh- 
man English required in each semester. 

8. Composition. (2 Hrs.) A continuation of course 2 for stu- 
dents who desire additional instruction in general composition. 

Second semester; T., Th., 10:00. Assistant Professor Farris. 

Composition and Rhetoric. 

11. Description and Narration. (3 Hrs.) Primarily for sopho- 
mores. (6). 

First semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Professor Farris. 

12. Short Story Writing. (3 Hrs.) For sophomores and juniors. 
Prerequisite: two hours of advanced composition. 

Second semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Mrs. Reed. 

13. Expository Writing. (2 Hrs.) Primarily for sophomores. 
Practical forms of expository composition. (4). 

First semester; T., Th., 10:00. Professor Johnson, 24 W. 

14. Expository Writing. (2 Hrs.) For sophomores and juniors. 
The informal essay and other literary types of expository composi- 
tion. Prerequisite: two hours of advanced composition or consent 
of the instructor. (4). 

Second semester; T., Th., 10:00. Professor Johnson, 24 W. 

NOTE: Either Course 13 or Course 14 is required of students 
whose major is English. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 129 

19. Theme Read'ng. (1 Hr.) Students qualified to do the work 
may be assigned by the head of the department to read freshman 
themes for instructors. 

21, (121). Advanced Composition. (2 Hrs.) For seniors and 
graduates. The course is intended for a limited number of students 
who desire to take up some particular topic or problem in advanced 
composition or who wish personal criticism and direction in the prepa- 
ration of theses or papers in connection with ether courses. Students 
must consult the instructor before registering for the course. (11). 

First semester; M., F., 10:00. Professor Johnson, 24 W. 

23, (123). English Prose Style. (2 Hrs.) For seniors and 
graduates. The work will be varied to suit the needs of the students 
who desire the course. (5). 

First semester; M., W., F., 8:00. Professor , 24 W. 

24. Literary Criticism. (3 Hrs.) For juniors, seniors and gradu- 
ates. The fundamental principles by which literature is adjudged. 

Second semester; M., W., F., 8:00. Professor , 30 W. 

English Language and Literature. 

The aims of this division of English are: (a) A scientific knowl- 
edge of the origin and development of the English language; (b) A 
general acquaintance with English literature; (c) a specific knowledge 
of certain great authors, periods and movements in English literature. 

29. The English Language. (2 Hrs.) A more elementary course 
than Course 30; given only in the Summer School. (17). 

Hours to be arranged. Professor Johnson, 24 W. 

30. The English Language. (2 Hrs.) For sophomores, juniors, 
and seniors. Origin, growth and structure; the vocabulary of modern 
English. English majors who are entering journalism as a profession 
may substitute this course for English 20. 

Second semester; T., Th., 8:00. Professor Cox, 32 W. 

31, (131). Old English. (3 Hrs.) For undergraduates and gradu- 
ates. Required of all students who make English their major. .The 
essentials of Anglo-Saxon grammar; translations. (20). 

First semester; M., W., F., sections at 8:00 and 11:00. Professor 
Cox, 32 W. 

32, (132). Old English— Beowulf. (3 Hrs.) For undergraduates 
and graduates who have had English 31. (21). 

Second semester; M., W., F., 8:00. Professor Cox, 32 W. 



130 West Virginia University 

33, (133). Early Middle English. (2 Hrs.) For undergraduates 
and graduates who have had English 31. Reading of early middle 
English texts. (22). 

First semester; T., Th., 8:00. Professor Cox, 32 W. 

34, (134). Chaucer. (3 Hrs.) For juniors, seniors, and gradu- 
ates. Required of all students who make English their major. The 
Canterbury Tales. (24). 

Second semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Professor Cox, 32 W. 

35,(135). iShakespeare. (3 Hrs.) For juniors, seniors and gradu- 
ates. Required of all students who make English their major. A 
critical reading of Othello, Macbeth, and Twelfth Night. (25). 

First semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Professor Cox, 32 W. 

Periods and Authors. 

42, (142). Shakespeare. (3 Hrs.) For juniors, seniors, and 
graduates. Required of all students who make English their major. 
Several plays are read with attention to characters, plot development, 
and general literary interpretation. (28). 

Second semester; M., W., F., 8:00. Professor Armstrong, 31 W. 

45, (145). Milton. (3 Hrs.) For juniors, seniors and graduates. 
A study of Milton's poems and the Areopagitica. ('Omitted in 1925- 
26.) (29). 

Second semester; T., Th., 11:00. Professor Cox, 32 W. 

48. English Literature. (3 Hrs.) For sophomores, juniors, and 
seniors. From the death of Swift to the publication of the Lyrical 
Ballads. (1745-1798.) (32). 

First semester; M., W., F., 8:00. Professor Barbe, 33 W. 

49. English Literature. (2 Hrs.) Primarily for seniors and 
graduates. From the publication of the Lyrical Ballads to the death 
of Scott (1798-1832). Prerequisite: four hours of advanced English. 
(33). 

First semester; T., Th., 11:00. Professor Armstrong, 31 W. 

.50. Wordsworth. (3 Hrs.) For sophomores, juniors and seniors. 
(Omitted 1925-26.) (47). 

Second semester; M., W., F., 11:00. Professor Barbe, 33 W. 

51. Mid-Victorian Poetry. (2 Hrs.) For sophomores, juniors, 
and seniors. (44). 

First semester; T., Th., 9:00. Professor Barbe, 33 W. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 131 

52, (152). English Literature. (2 Hrs.) For juniors, seniors 
and graduates. A study of the chief prose writers of the nineteenth 
century exclusive of fiction. Prerequisite: four hours of advanced 
English. (Omitted in 1925-26). (35). 

First semester; T., Th., 11:00. Professor Armstrong. 31 W. 

53. Browning. (3 Hrs.) For sophomores, juniors and seniors. 
(51). 

Second semester; M., W., F., 11:00. Professor Barbe. 33 W. 

55, (155). Tennyson. (2 Hrs.) For sophomores, juniors and 
seniors. Special attention is paid to the origin and development of 
the Arthurian legends. (Omitted in 1925-26). 

First semester; T., Th., 11:00. Professor Cox. 32 W. 

58. Rudyard Kipling. (3 Hrs.) For juniors, seniors and grad- 
uates. A study of both prose and poetry. 

Second semester; M., W., F., 11:00. Professor Cox. 32 W. 

60. Modern British Poetry. (2 Hrs.) For sophomores, juniors, 
and seniors. (57). 

Second semester; T., Th., 9:00. Professor Barbe. 33 W. 

62, (162). The Modern Drama. (3 Hrs.) For juniors, seniors 
and graduates. Readings, lectures, and reports. A few foreign plays 
in translation will be considered. (54). 

Second semester; M., W., F., 11:00. Professor Cox. 32 W. 

American Literature. 

65. General Survey of American Literature. (3 Hrs.) For soph- 
omores, juniors and seniors. Required of all English majors. (39). 

First semester; M., W., F., 11:00. Professor Armstrong. 31 W. 

66. Types of American Fiction. (3 Hrs.) Primarily for seniors 
and graduates. (43). 

Second semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Professor Armstrong. 31 W. 

67. American History in American Literature. (2 Hrs.) Pri- 
marily for seniors and graduates. (Omitted in 1925-26). 

Second semester; T., Th., 9:00. Professor Armstrong. 31 W. 

68. Modern American Poetry. J 2 Hrs.) For sophomores, jun- 
iors and seniors. (56). 

First semester; T., Th., 10:00. Professor Armstrong. 31 W. 



132 West Virginia University 

Literary Types. 

72, (172). The. Ballad. (2 Hrs.) Primarily for seniors and grad- 
uates. A study of the popular English and Scottish ballads with a 
special consideration of types found in West Virginia. (48). 

Second semester; T., Th., 11:00. Professor Cox. 32 W. 

73, (173). A Study of Poetry. (2 Hrs.) For seniors and grad- 
uates. English poetry: types, forms, meters, and other essential 
qualities. 

Second semester; T., Th., 11:00. Professor Barbe. 33 W. 

74, Nature Poetry. (2 Hrs.) For sophomores, juniors, and sen- 
iors. Special attention is igiven to Wordsworth, Bryant and Lowell. 
(52). 

First semester; T., Th., 11:00. Professor Cox. 32 W. 

75, The iShort Story. (2 Hrs.) For undergraduates. Interpre- 
tation of the short story as a form of literature. (38). 

Second semester; T., Th., 10:00. Professor Armstrong. 31 W. 

76, (176). The Novel. (3 Hrs.) For juniors, seniors and grad- 
uates. Various types of the novel are studied in order to show its 
development and relation to life. (40). 

Second semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Professor Johnson. 24 W. 

77, (177). The Essay. (3 Hrs.) For iseniors and graduates. A 
study of the various types of the essay with critical examination of 
representative essays from English and American authors. Practice 
in writing. Graduate students will be expected to prepare a paper 
dealing with some phase of the evolution of the essay. (10). 

First semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Professor Johnson. 24 W. 

79. Minor Types of Prose Literature. (2 Hrs.) (Omitted in 
1925-6). 

First semester; M., F., 10;00; Professor Johnson. 



81. The English Old Testament. (3 Hrs.) For sophomores, 
juniors, and seniors. Required of all students who make English their 
major. A study of the Old Testament in English as literature and 
history. (36). 

First semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Professor Armstrong. 32 W. 

82. The English New Testament. (3 Hrs.) For undergraduates. 
A study of the New Testament in English as literature. (37). 

Second semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Professor Armstrong. 31 W. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 133 

84. (184). English Literature. (2 Hrs.) Primarily for seniors 
and graduates. Study of an author. The entire production or the 
most important work of some selected author is studied to gain a 
complete view. The author for 1925-26 is Ruskin. Prerequisite: At 
least four hours of advanced English. (42). 

Second semester; T., Th., 8:00. Professor Armstrong. 31 W. 

85. Masterpieces of European Literature. (3 Hrs.) For soph- 
omores, juniors, and seniors. A study of a number of literary master- 
pieces in English, including Cervantes' ''Don Quixote," Goethe's 
"Faust," Shelley's "Adonais," Hardy's "The Return of the Native," 
Turgenev's "Fathers and Sons," Moliere's "Misanthrope," Hugo'rs 
"Hernani." (66). 

First semester; M., W., F., 11:00. Professor Barbe. 33 W. 

86. English for Engineers. (1 Hr.) For seniors in the College 
of Engineering. Consideration of some special problems of technical 
composition; preparation, criticism, and revision of student exercises, 
report and theses; study of some good examples of technical litera- 
ture. (14). 

Second semester; M., F., 10:00. Professor Johnson. 24 W. 

Journalism. 

The courses in journalism are planned to meet the needs of three 
classes of students: those who wish to make journalistic training and 
practice the nucleus of a °eneral education of modern content; thoee 
who believe that familiarity with standard newspaper practice and 
successful public-relations methods is indispensable in present-day 
business and professional affairs; and those who contemplate repor- 
torial and literary work or the editing and management of newpa- 
pers, magazines or special periodicals as a career. 

Only courses 5 and 10 are to be regarded as English courses in 
counting up the maximum amount of credit in English (36 hours) 
allowed to any student. Other courses in journalism are free electives. 
English 1 and 2 are prerequisites to all journalism courses, also Eng- 
lish 3 and 4 in colleges requiring these two courses. 

1. News Gathering and Writing. (3 Hrs.) Two lectures and 
three laboratory hours. (71). 

First semester; lectures, M., F., 10:00; laboratory, M. or W. or 
F., 2:00-5:00. Associate Professor Reed. 4 W. 

2. The Newspaper. (3 Hrs.) Two lectures and three laboratory 
hours. A continuation of course 1. (72). 

Second semester; lectures, M., F., 10:00; laboratory, M. or W. or 
F., 2:00-5:00. Associate Professor Reed. 4 W. 



134 West Virginia University 

3. Newspaper Editing I. (2 Hrs.) One lecture and three labora- 
tory hours. Prerequisites : Courses 1 and 2, or consent of instructor. 
(73). 

First semester; M. or W., 2:00-4:00; F., 2:00-4:00. Associate 
Professor Reed. 4 W. 

4. Newspaper Editing II. (2 Hrs.) One lecture and three labora- 
tory hours. Continuation of course 3. (74). 

Second semester; M. or W., 2:00-4:00; F., 2:00-4:00; Associate 
Professor Reed. 4 W. 

5. Feature Articles. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisite: junior or senior 
standing. (Not given 1925-26). (75). 

First semester; T., Th., 10:00. Associate Professor Reed. 4 W. 

6. Advertisement- Writing. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisite: junior or 
senior standing. (Not given 1925-26). (76). 

Second semester; T., Th., 10:00. Associate Professor Reed. 4 
W. 

7. History of American Journalism. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisite: 
junior or senior standing. (78). 

Second semester; T., Th., 10:00. Associate Professor Reed. 4 
W. 

8. The Community Newspaper. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisites: Courses 
1, 2, 3 and 4, or consent of instructor. 

First semester; T., Th., 10:00. Associate Professor Reed. 4 W. 

9. Special Periodicals. (2 Hrs.) Journalistic practice as adapted 
to the particular needs of the professions, business, industry, tech- 
nology and the like. Prerequisites: Courses 1, 2, 3 and 4, or consent 
of instructor. (Not 'given 1925-26). 

Second semester; T., Th., 11:00. Associate Professor Reed. 4 
W. 

10. The Editorial. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisite: junior or senior 
standing. (79). 

First semester; T., Th., 11:00. Associate Professor Reed. 4 W. 

11. Journalism Ethics. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisite: junior or senior, 
standing. 

Second semester; T., Th., 11:00. Associate Professor Reed. 4 
W. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 135 

ENTOMOLOGY 

1. General Entomology. (4 Hrs.) A study of the external 
structures, classification, habits, and local distribution of insects and 
their near relatives. Lectures and text-book. Laboratory and field 
work in the collecting and mounting of the more common local in- 
sects, the classification of the insects, and the study, aided by dis- 
sections and drawings, of the external anatomy of various types. 
Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

Second semester; M., W., F., 11:00; M., Th. or F., 2:00. Profes- 
sor Peairs (College of Agriculture). 

Courses 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, and 1L in entomology offered in the College 
of Agriculture are also regular elective courses in the College of Arts 
and Sciences. For detailed announcement of these courses see the 
announcements of the College of Agriculture. 

FARM ECONOMICS. 

2. Rural Economics. (4 Hrs.) The study of economics as re- 
lated to all phases of rural life. 

Second semester; M., T., W., F., 9:00. Associate Professor 
Dadisman (College of Agriculture). 

Course 1 in Farm Management is included in the list of agricul- 
tural subjects from which not to exceed 15 hours may be selected for 
credit in the College of Arts and Sciences. See announcements of 
College of Agriculture. 

GENETICS. 

Genetics 21 is included in the list of agricultural subjects from 
which not to exceed 15 hours may be selected for credit in the College 
of Arts and Sciences. See announcements of the College of Agricul- 
ture. 

GEOLOGY AND MINERALOGY. 

Professor S. B. Brown, Professor Tilton and Associate Professor 

Scheffel. 

NOTE: Excursions are taken by the classes over the outcrop of 
the Coal Measures and through the westernmost fold of the Appala- 
chian Mountains, giving, within a radius of seven miles of the Uni- 
versity, a complete geological section through the Mississippian and 
Pennsylvanian (Coal Measures) systems. Producing oil and gas wells 
are situated within ten miles of the University. 

1. Physical Geography. (3 Hrs.) Primarily for sophomores. 
This course is designed especially for those who wish to teach physi- 



136 West Virginia University 

cal geography. Prerequisite: some knowledge of physics and chem- 
istry. 

First semester; M., F., 10:00; W., 2:00. Associate Professor 
Scheffel, 111 M. H. 

2. General Geology. (3 Hrs.) Not open to freshmen. Numerous 
field trips will be taken. Prerequisite: some knowledge of chemistry. 

First semester; section 1 (for engineers) M., W., F., 8:00; Asso- 
ciate Professor Scheffel, 111 M. H.; section 2, M., W., F., 9:00; 
Professor Tilton, 111 M. H.; section 3, M., W., F., 11:00; Professor 
Brown, 111 M. H. 

Second semester; section 1 (for engineers M., W., F., 9:00'; As- 
sociate Professor Scheffel, 111 M. H.; section 2, M., F., 10:00, W., 
1:00; Professor TlLTON, 111 M. H.; section 3, M., W., F., 11:00; Pro- 
fessor Brown, 111 M. H. 

3. Historical Geology. (3 Hrs.) Not open to freshmen. Pre- 
requisite: Geology 2, and some knowledge of botany and zoology. 

Both semesters; M., W., F., 8:00. Professor Tilton. Ill M. H. 

6. General Mineralogy. (5 Hrs.) Primarily for sophomores. 
Prerequisite: Trigonometry and some knowledge of chemistry and 
physics. 

First semester; sections at 8:00 and 9:00. Professor Brown. 
113 M. H. 

7. Determinative Mineralogy. (5 Hrs.) Continuation of course 
6. Prerequisite: Course 6 and some knowledge of chemistry and 
physics. 

Second semester; 8:00. Professor Brown. 113 M. H. 

8. Geology of West Virginia. (2 Hrs.) Designed for seniors and 
particularly for those who expect to teach in higih schools. Prerequi- 
site: Course 2:. 

First semester; T., Th., 11:00. Professor Brown. Ill M. H. 

10. Building iStones. (2 Hrs.) Adapted to the needs of engineers 
and architects. 

Second semester; T., Th., 11:00. Professor Brown. Ill M. H. 

11. Economic Geology. (3 Hrs.) For juniors and seniors. Pre- 
requisite: Course 2. (4). 

Both semesters; M., W., F., 11:00. Associate Professor Schef- 
fel. Ill M. H. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 137 

12. Economic Geology. (3 Hrs.) For juniors and seniors. Pre- 
requisite: Course 2 or Course 6. (5). 

Second semester; M., F., 10:00, and a third hour to be arranged. 
Professor Brown. 113 M. H. 

13, (113). Oil and Gas Geology. (2 or 3 Hrs.) For seniors and 
graduates. Prerequisite: Courses .... and ...., trigonometry, chemistry, 
and physics. 

First semester; T., Th., 8:00, and a third hour to be arranged. 
Associate Professor Scheffel, 111 M. H. 

21. General Geology Laboratory. (1 Hs.) Designed to accom- 
pany or follow Course 2. 

Both semesters; Th.., 10:00-12:00. Associate Professor Schef- 
fel. 

32. Historical Geology (Areal and Structural) Laboratory. (1 
Hr.) Designed to accompany or follow Course 3. (31). 

Second semester; W., 2:00-5:00. Professor Tilton, 111 M. H. 

62, (162). Field Geology. (3 Hrs.) For juniors and seniors, 
open to graduates as a minor. Prerequisites: Course 3 arid surveying. 
(17). 

Second semester; Th., 11:00; S., 8:00-12:00. Associate Profes- 
sor Scheffel, 112 M. H. 

166. Advanced Field Geology. (3 to 5 Hrs.) Open only to grad- 
uates. Special problems to be worked out by the student. Those in- 
terested must consult the instructor before registering. (18). 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. Associate Professor 
Scheffel, 112 M. H. 

71, 72, (171, 172). Field Geology on Distant Areas. (1 to 3 Hrs.) 

Primarily for graduate students. Prerequisite: Courses 81 and 32. 
(20). 

Both semesters; hours to be arranged. Professor Tilton, 112 
M. H. 

81, (181). Historical Geology (Paleontology) Laboratory. (1 
Hr.) For juniors and seniors; open to graduate students as a minor. 
(30). 

First semester; M., 2:00-5:00. Professor Tilton, 111 M. H. 

82, (182). Historical Geology (Paleontology) Laboratory. (1 
Hr.) For juniors and seniors; open to graduate students as a minor. 
A continuation of course 81. (32). 

Second semester; T., 2:00-5:00. Professor Tilton, 111 M. H. 



138 West Virginia University 

83, 84, (183, 184). iStratigraphic Paleontology. (1 Hr.) For 
seniors and graduate students. Prerequisite: Courses 3 and 81. (33). 

Both semesters; F., 1:00-4:00. Professor Tilton, 111 M. H. 

87, (187). Petrography. (2 Hrs.) For seniors and graduates. 
Prerequisite: Course 2, some additional knowledge of mineralogy and 
of light. (11). 

First semester; T., Th., 9:00; laboratory hours to be arranged. 
Professor Tilton, 112 M. H. 

91, 92, (191, 192). Geologic Readings— jSeminar. (1 Hr.) For 
juniors, seniors, and graduates. Designed to accompany or follow 
Course 3. 

Both semesters; hours to be arranged. Professor Tilton. 

Engineering Geology. 

The following courses in geology designed particularly to meet 
the needs of students in mining engineering or in oil and gas engi- 
neering are offered in the College of Eingieering. 

Eng'g. 89. Elementary Mineralogy. (1 Hr.) Not counted for 
credit in the College of Arts and Sciences. Prerequisite: Chemistry 
4 or equivalent. 

First semester. Assistant Professor La wall (College of Engi- 
neering), 119 M. H. 

Eng'g. 92. Oil and Gas Production. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisite: 
Geology 13. 

Second semester; T., Th., 8:00. Associate Professor Scheffel, 
112 M. H. 

NOTE : For further information regarding engineering geology 
see the announcements of the College of Engineering. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 139 

GERMANIC LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES. 

Professor Porterfield and Assistant Professor Michel. 

1. Elementary German. (5 Hrs.) Pronunciation, syntax, trans- 
lation, composition. 

First semester; M., T., W., Th., F., 9:00, 11:00 and 2:00; second 
semester, M., T., W., Th., F., 11:00. Professor Porterfield and As- 
sistant Professor Michel, 25 W. and 20 W. 

2. Elementary German. (5 Hrs.) Review of syntax, translation, 
composition. 

First semester; M., T., W., Th., F., 11:00; second semester, M., 
T., W., Th., F., 9:00, 11:00 and 2:00. Professor Porterfield and 
Assistant Professor Michel, 25 W. and 20 W. 

3. Intermediate German. (5 Hrs.) Rapid reading of prose by 
modern authors, memorizing" of poems, dictation, composition. 

First semester; M., T., W., Th., F., 8:00. Assistant Professor 
Michel, 20 W. 

4. Intermediate German. (5 Hrs.) Continuation of Course 3. 
Second semester; M., T., W., Th., F., 8:00. Assistant Professor 

Michel, 20 W. 

5. Classical German. (3 Hrs.) Critical study of selected works 
by Wieland, Lessing, Goethe, Schiller. 

First semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Professor Porterfield, 25 W. 

6. Classical German. (3 Hrs.) Critical study of selected works 
by Kleist, Grillparzer, Hebel, Ludwig. 

Second semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Professor Porterfield, 25 W. 

7. Modern German. (2 Hrs.) Appreciative study of represen- 
tative novels and dramas by Hermann Sudermann. 

First semester; T. and Th., 9:00. Professor Porterfield, 25 W. 

8. Modern German. (2 Hrs.) Appreciative study of representa- 
tive novels and dramas by Gerhart Hauptmann. 

Second semester; T. and Th., 9:00 . Professor Porterfield, 25 W. 

21. Scientific German. (3 Hrs.) Intended primarily for stu- 
dents in science courses. Prerequisites: One year of college German 
or two years of high school German. (19). 

First semester; M., W., F., 2:00. Professor Porterfield, 25 W. 

22. Scientific German. (3 Hrs.) Continuation of Course 21. 
Second semester; M., W., F., 2:00. Professor Porterfield, 25 W. 



140 West Virginia University 

31. Teachers' German. (2 Hrs) Intended primarily for part- 
time students and similar to Courses 2, 3 and 4. Prerequisites: One 
year of college German or two years of high school German. 

First semester; S., 10:00 to 12:00. Assistant Professor Michel, 
20 W. 

32. Teachers' German. (2 Hrs.) Continuation of Course 31. 
Second semester; S., 10:00 to 12:00. Assistant Professor 

Michel, 20 W. 

41, (141). Faust, Part I. (2 Hrs.) Open also to qualified un- 
dergraduates. (14). 

First semester; T. and Th., 2:00. Professor Porterfield, 25 W. 

42, (142). ..Faust, Part II. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisite: Course 101. 
(14). 

Second semester; T. and Th., 2:00. Professor Porterfield, 25 
W. 

145. History of German Literature, 1796-1870. (2 Hrs.) (Given 
in 1926-27). (12). 

First semester; T. and Th., 10:00. Professor Porterfield, 25 W. 

T46. History of German Literature, 1870-1914. (2 Hrs.) Con- 
tinuation of Course 105. (Given in 1926-27). (12). 

Second semester; T. and Th., 10:00. Professor Porterfield, 25 
W. 

147. German -Swiss Literature. (2 Hrs.) Intensive study of the 
modern Swiss novel from Gottfried Keller to the present. (Given in 
1926-27). 

First semester; T. and Th., 3:00. Assistant Professor Michel, 
20 W. 

148. German-Swiss Literature. (2 Hrs.) Continuation of Course 
111. (Given in 1926-27). 

Second semester; T. and Th., 3:00. Assistant Professor Michel, 
20 W. 

GREEK. 

Professor Bishop. 

1. Elementary Greek. (5 Hrs.) 
First semester; 11:00; 23 W. 

2. Elementary Greek. (5 Hrs.) Continuation of Course 1. 
Second semester; 11:00; 23 W. 

3. Xenophon's Anabasis. (4 Hrs.) 

First semester; M., T., Th., F., 10:00; 23 W. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 141 

4. Selections from Lucian; Homer's Odyssey. (4 Hrs.) 
Second semester; M., T., Th., F., 10:00; 23 W. 

7. Plato's Apology, Crito, and Euthyphro. (3 Hrs.) 
First semester; M., W., F., 9:00; 23 W. 

8. Demosthenes On the Crown. (3 Hrs.) (Omitted in 1924-25). 
Second semester; M., W., F., 9:00; 23 W. 

11. Thucydides. (3 Hrs.) (Omitted in 1924-25). 
First semester; M., W., F., 9:00; 23 W. 

14. Euripides' Ion. (3 Hrs.) Open to seniors and graduate stu- 
dents. 

Second semester; M., W., F., 9:00; 23 W. 

21. The New Testament in Greek. (3 Hrs.) The Gospels. (17). 
First semester; M., W., F., 2:00; 23 W. 

22. The New Testament in Greek. (3 Hrs.) The Acts and the 
Church Epistles. (18). 

Second semester; M., W., F., 2:00; 23 W. 

23. The New Testament in Greek. (3 Hrs.) The Epistle to the 
Hebrews, the Pastoral Epistles and the Apocalypse. (Omitted in 
1924-25). (24). 

Either semester; M., W., F., 3:00; 23 W. 

31. Greek Archaeology. (2 Hrs.) (26). 
First semester; T., Th., 3:00; 23 W. 

32. Mythology. (2 Hrs.) (20). 
First semester; T., Th., 3:00; 23 W. 

35. Every Day Greek. (1 Hr.) A study of the Greek origin of 
English words, especially of the technical vocabulary of chemistry, 
astronomy, physics, philosophy, and other sciences. (23). 

Both semesters; W., 4:00; 23 W. 

41. Greek Literature in Translation. (2 Hrs.) Homer's Iliad or 
Odyssey. (15). 

First semester; T., Th., 9:00; 23 W. 

42. Greek Literature in Translation. (2 Hrs.) Tragedies of Eu- 
ripides or of Sophocles. (21). 

Second semester; T„ Th., 9:00; 23 W. 

51. Comparative Philology. (2 Hrs.) A general introduction to 
the subject of comparative philology. Prerequisite: Credit for at 
least ten hours' colloge work in each of two foreign languages. (19). 

First semester; T., Th., 2:00; 23 W. 



142 West Virginia University 

HISTORY AND POLITICAL (SCIENCE 

Professor Callahan, Professor Chitwood, Professor Ambler, Pro- 
fessor Shortridge, Assistant Professor Mitchell and Mr. Elviken. 

The work offered in this department includes: (1) Continental 
European History; (2) English History; (3) American History; and 
(4) Political Science. 

Instruction is given by lectures, text-book work, assigned col- 
lateral readings; preparation of papers, syllabi, and maps; special 
reports, recitations, and informal conferences. 

Students are encouraged to observe and to read contemporary 
history and politics. 

An afternoon hour is designated for conference and for direction 
of library work. 

History majors before their graduation are required to complete 
25 hours in their major subject, including a seminar course, and to 
complete at least 5 hours in political science and 6 hours in economics 
or sociology, at least 4 hours in a biological science (zoology or 
botany), and to meet all special requirements for the A.B. degree. 

Students who desire their major work in political science are 
required to complete at least 10 hours in history in addition to 25 
hours in political science. 

Continental European History. 

Students who .select continental European history as their princi- 
pal study are advised to take French or German, in the early part 
of the University course. 

Most students (except pre-law students) should begin with 
Courses 4 and 5 or 27 and 28. 

1. History of Ancient Civilization. (2 Hrs.) For freshmen. 
(Omitted in 1925-26.) (10). . 

Assistant Professor Mitchell, 43 W. 

2. History of Rome. (2 Hrs.) For freshmen. (Omitted in 
1925-26.) (11). 

Assistant Professor Mitchell, 43 W. 

3. Current European History. (1 Hr.) For freshmen. (Omit- 
ted in 1925-26.) (45). 

Professor Chitwood, 41 W. 

4. Modern European History to 1815. (3 Hrs.) Primarily for 
freshmen. (14). 

First semester; first section, M., W., c :00, and a third hour for 
quiz sections arranged to meet the convenience of instructor and stu- 
dents. Second section, M., F., 10:00, and a third hour for quiz sec- 
tions. Assistant Professor Mitchell, 46 W. 



The College of Arts and Sciences I 43 

5. Modern European History Since 1815. (3 Hrs.) Primarily 
for freshmen. A continuation of Course 4. (15). 

Second semester; first section, M., W., 8:00, and a third hour 
for quiz sections arranged to meet the convenience of instructor and 
students. Second section, M., F., 10:00, and a third hour for quiz 
sections. Assistant Professor Mitchell, 46 W. 

6. Medieval History. (2 Hrs.) For sophomores and juniors. 
(12). 

First semester; T., Th., 11:00. Assistant Professor Mitchell, 
43 W. 

7. French Revolution. (2 Hrs.) Primarily for juniors. Pre- 
requisite: History 4 or the consent of the instructor. (44). 

First semester; T., Th., 8:00. Assistant Professor Mitchell, 
43 W. 

8. Napoleonic Period. (2 Hrs.) Primarily for juniors. A con- 
tinuation of History 7. Prerequisite: History 7 or the consent of 
the instructor. (46). 

Second semester; T., Th., 8:00. Assistant Professor Mitchell, 
43 W. 

9. History of Spain. (2 Hrs.) Primarily for juniors. Prerequi- 
site: A reading knowledge of French or Spanish. (Omitted in 1925- 
26.) (47). 

First semester; Assistant Professor Mitchell, 43 W. 

10. History of Spain. (2 Hrs.) Primarily for juniors. A con- 
tinuation of History 9. Prerequisite: A reading knowledge of Frencn 
or Spanish, and History 9 or the consent of the instructor. (Omitted 
in 1925-26.) (48). 

Second semester; Assistant Professor Mitchell, 43 W. 

11. European Social and Economic History. (2 Hrs.) Primarily 
for seniors. 

First semester; T., Th., 9:00. Assistant Professor Mitchell, 
43 W. 

12. Current Problems in European Political Geography. (2 Hrs.) 
Primarily for juniors. (75). 

Second semester; T., Th., 9:00. Assistant Professor Mitchell, 
43 W. 

13. Expansion of Europe, 1500-1925. (2 Hrs.) For seniors. 
(Omitted 1925-26.) (49). 

First semester; Assistant Professor Mitchell, 43 W. 



144 West Virginia University 

14, (114). Renaissance and Reformation. (3 Hrs.) For seniors 
and graduates. (13). 

Second semester; M. , W., F., 11:00. Assistant Professor 
Mitchell, 43 W. 

15, (115). Contemporary Europe, 1870-1921. (3 Hrs.) Open to 

seniors and graduate students. Prerequisite: A knowledge of the 
outline facts of European history from 1815 to 1870. (Omitted 1925- 
26.) (50). 

First semester; M., W., F., 11:00. Professor Chitwood, 41 W. 

16, (116). Seminar in European History. (2 Hrs.) For gradu- 
ates; open to seniors with the consent of the instructor. (Omitted 
1925-26.) (16). 

First semester; Professor Chitwood, 41 W. 

17, (117). Seminar in Modern European History. (2 Hrs.) Open 
to graduates and well prepared seniors. (76). 

Second semester; T., Th., 10:00. Assistant Professor Mitchell, 
43 W. 

18, (118). The Causes of the World War.' (2 Hrs.) For gradu- 
ates; open to seniors with the consent of the instructor. (Omitted 
in 1925-26.) 

Second semester; Professor Chitwood, 41 W. 

English History. 

NOTE: — Courses 27 and 28 furnish a good foundation for the 
study of American history and law and are required as a prerequisite 
for advanced courses in English history. The library is well equipped 
for advanced courses in the history of Canada and in seventeenth 
century England. 

27. History of England to the Stuarts. (3 Hrs.) Primarily for 
sophomores but with certain sections reserved for pre-law freshmen. 
(17). 

First semester; sections for pre-law freshmen only; M., W., F., 
8:00 and 11:00; . /Sections primarily for sopho- 
mores; M., W., F., 8:00 and 11:00. Professor Shortridge, 20 L (or 
46 W.). 

28. History of England Since the Stuarts. (3 Hrs.) (18). 
Second semester; sections for pre-law freshmen only; M., W., F., 

8:00 and 11:00; . Sections primarily for sopho- 
mores; M., W., F., 8:00 and 11:00. Professor Shortridge, 20 L (or 
46 W.). 



The College of Arts and Sciences 145 

29. English Social and Industrial History. (3 Hrs.) Primarily 
for freshmen in home economics and agriculture. (19). 

First semester; M., W., F., 11:00. . 

30. English Historical and Practical Politics. (2 Hrs.) Primari- 
ly for juniors and pre-law sophomores. Prerequisites: History 27 or 
28. (65). 

First semester; M., F., 10:00. Professor Shortridge, 20 L. 

31. Development of the British Empire. (2 Hrs.) Primarily 
for juniors and seniors. (99). 

First semester; T., Th., 11:00. Professor Shortridge, 20 L. 

32. (132). History of Canada. (2 Hrs.) Primarily for juniors 
and seniors who have had History 27 and 28, but open to graduates. 
(67). 

Second semester; T., Th., 11:00. Professor Shortridge, 20 L. 

33. (133). The Puritan Revolution. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisites: 
History 27 and 28. (70). 

Second semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Professor Shortridge, 20 L. 

36, (136). English Constitutional History and Law. (2 Hrs.) 

Prerequisite: History 27 and 28. (20). 

First semester; T., Th., 9:00. Professor Shortridge, 20 L. 

37, (137). Seminar in English and Canadian History. (2 Hrs.) 
Second semester; T., Th., 9:00. Professor Shortridge, 20 L. 

American History. 

All students of American history should have Channing and 
Hart's Guide, and Shepherd's Historical Atlas. 

47. History of the United States to 1840. (2 Hrs.) A general 
survey course offered only at extension centers. (7). 

First semester; Professor Ambler. 

48. History of the United States Since 1840. (2 Hrs.) A gen- 
eral survey course offered only at extension centers. Continuation 
of Course 7. (8). 

Second semester; Professor Ambler. 

49. American Social and Economic History. (3 Hrs.) Primarily 
for freshmen in home economics and agriculture. Not open to juniors, 
seniors, or to students who have had History 52 or 53. (29). 

Second semester; M., W., F., 11:00. Extra quiz sections, hours to 
be arranged. , 46 W. 



146 West Virginia University 

50. History of West Virginia. (1 Hr.) For freshmen or sopho- 
mores. (32). 

First and second semesters; Th., 10:00. Professor Callahan, 
20 L. 

51. American Colonial History* 1492-1776. (2 Hrs.) Primarily 
for freshmen. (21).. 

Second semester; first section, T., Th., 10:00. Extra quiz sec- 
tions, hours to be arranged. Professor Chitwood, 46 W. 

52. The Formation of the Union: American Political History, 
1776-1829. (3 Hrs.) Primarily for juniors and pre-law sophomores. 
(22). 

First semester; M., W., F., 9:00; T., Th., S., 9:00. Extra quiz 
sections, hours to be arranged. Professor Chitwood, 46 W. 

NOTE : — Courses 52 and 53 should be taken in regular order. 
Students who can take only one course should register for Course 52. 

53. Division and Reunion: American Political History Since 1829. 

(3 Hrs.) A continuation of Course 52. Primarily for juniors and 
pre-law sophomores. (23). 

Second semester; M., W., F., 9:00; T., Th., S., 9:00. Extra quiz 
sections, hours to be arranged. Professor Chitwood, 46 W. 

54. Development of the West. (2 Hrs.) For juniors who have 
had college courses in American history. (27). 

Second semester; T., Th., 11:00. Professor Shortridge, 20 L. 

55. American Constitutional Development. (3 Hrs.) Primarily 
for juniors. (42). 

First semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Professor Callahan, 20 L. 

56. Education — The Teaching of History and Civics. For juniors 
and seniors preparing to teach in secondary schools. (33). 

Summer School. Professor Ambler, 45 W. 

57. Problems of the Civil War Period 1850-1872. (3 Hrs.^ Pri- 
marily for juniors and seniors with major in history or in economics. 
(53). 

Second semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Professor Callahan, 20 L. 

58. (158). Reconstruction and Later American History 1865-1924. 

(3 Hrs.) Primarily for seniors who major in history but open to other 
seniors and graduates on approval. (24). 

Second semester; M., F., 10:00, and third hour to be arranged. 
Professor Ambler, 45 W. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 147 

59, (159). The Trans-Allegheny Frontier. (2 Hrs.) For seniors 
and graduates. (51). 

First semester; T., Th., 8:00. Professor Ambler, 45 W. 

60, (160). History of American Diplomacy and Foreign Policy, 
1776-1920. (2 Hrs.) Open to seniors and graduates who have credit 
for History 52 or 53 or 55. (26). 

First semester; T., Th., 9:00. Professor Callahan, 20 L. 

61, (161). Latin-American History. (2 Hrs.) Primarily for 
seniors but open to graduates. (Omitted 1925-26.) (31). 

Second semester; T., Th., 9:00. Professor Callahan, 21 L. 

62, (162). The American Revolution and the Making of the Con- 
stitution. (2 Hrs.) For seniors and graduates. (30). 

Second semester; T., Th., 8:00. Professor Ambler, 45 W. 

63, (163). Anglo-American Diplomatic Relations. (2 Hrs.) For 
seniors and graduates who have had college courses in American po- 
litical or constitutional history, or History 160. (Omitted 1925-26.) 
(55). 

First semester; T., Th., 9:00. Professor Callahan, 20 L. 

64, (164). American Relations with Latin America... (2 Hrs.) 

For seniors and graduates who have had college courses in American 
political 'history. (56). 

Second semester; T., Th., 11:00. Professor Callahan, 20 L. 

65, (165). Special American Diplomatic Problems. (2 Hrs.) 

Primarily for history majors, seniors and graduates whose previous 

credits include History 52 or 53, and 160. (Omitted 1925-26.) (64). 

Second semester; T., Th., 3:00. Professor Callahan, 20 L. 

66, (166). American Expansion Policy. (2 Hrs.) For graduate 
students. (25). 

First semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Callahan. 

67, (167). History of the South. (2 Hrs.) For seniors and grad- 
uates. (Omitted 1925-26.) (52). 

Professor Ambler, 45 W. 

68,(168). The Jacksonian Era. (2 Hrs.) For graduates. (135). 
Second semester; M., F., 10:00. Professor Chitwood, 41 W. 

70, (170). Seminar. (2 Hrs.) Primarily for graduates (History 
majors) who are preparing theses. Methods of historical research, 
construction, and interpretation. (34). 

First and second semesters; 3:00. Professor Callahan, 22 L. 



148 West Virginia University 

Historical Conference. 

First and second semesters; 3:00. Professor Callahan, 22 L. 

The attention of 'students taking American History is invited to 
the announcements of the Bryan prize and the Tax Commission prize 
on page 51 of the University Catalogue. 

Political Science. 

Students with major in political science are required to complete 
25 hours in that subject, 10 hours in history (which should include 
52 or 55 and a course in English constitutional history), 6 hours in 
economics or sociology, and at least 4 hours in a biological science. 
With the approval of their class officer political science majors plan- 
ning for public service (city manager, chamber of commerce, social 
center, etc.) may take a part of their required major work in the 
College of Law. The following law courses are recommended : Ad- 
ministrative Law, Constitutional Law, Municipal Corporations, and 
Public Utilities. 

1. Citizenship and Community Problems. (1 Hr.) An orientation 
and adjustment course for freshmen. 

First semester; Tu., 10:00. Professor Callahan, 20 L. 

3. American Political Parties. (2 Hrs.) For freshmen and 
sophomores. (9). 

First semester; T., Th., 9:00. Professor Ambler, 45 W. 

5. Introduction to American Federal Government. (3; Hrs.) 

Primarily for sophomores. (Offered also in extension classes.) (6). 
First semester; M., W., F., 9:00 and T., Th., S., 10:00. Professor 
Ambler, 45 W. 

6. State and Local Government. (3 Hrs.) Primarily for sopho- 
mores. (37). 

Second semester; M., W., F., 8:00 and 9:00. Professor Ambler, 
45 W. 

7. Municipal Government. (3 Hrs.) For juniors and seniors. 
(40). 

First semester; M., W., F., 11:00. Professor Ambler, 45 W. 

8. Municipal Administration. (3 Hrs.) For juniors and seniors. 
Second semester; M., W., F., 11:00. Professor Ambler, 45 W. 

9. Current Problems in European Political Geography. (2 Hrs.) 

Primarily for juniors. 

First semester; T., Th., 9:00. Assistant Professor Mitchell, 
43 W. (History 75.) 



The College of Arts and Sciences 149 

15, (115). Americn Practical Politics: Government at Work. (2 

Hrs.) Open to seniors and graduates. (See also History 30' and 136.) 
(35). 

First semester; M., F., 10:00. Professor Callahan, 20 L. 

16, (116). European History and Practical Politics. (2 Hrs.) 

Primarily for seniors who have had history. Open to graduates as a 
minor. (36). 

First semester; T., Th., 10:00. Assistant Professor Mitchell, 
43 W. 

18, (118). State and Local Administration. (2 Hrs.) For 

seniors and graduates. (Omitted 1925-26.) (38). 
Second semester; Professor Ambler. 

19, (119). Historical Political Theories. (2 Hrs.) (Omitted 
1925-26.) (39). 

Professor Ambler. 

20, (120). American Political Theories. (2 Hrs.) (See also 
History 55.) (Omitted 1925-26.) 

Professor Ambler. 

23, (123). International Law and Practice of Diplomacy. (2 Hrs.) 

Open to seniors and graduates with prerequisite courses in modern 
history. (43). 

Second semester; T., Th., 9:00. Professor Callahan, 20 L. 

60, (160). American Diplomacy and Foreign Policy. (See His- 
tory 160.) 

HOME ECONOMICS. 

Courses in this subject are offered in the College of Arts and 
Sciences and in the College of Agriculture. For detailed description 
of these courses see the announcements of the College of Agriculture. 

HORTICULTURE. 

Horticulture 2 and 3 are included in the list of Agricultural sub- 
jects from which not to exceed 15 hours may be selected for credit 
in the College of Arts and Sciences. See announcements of the Col- 
lege of Agriculture. 



150 West Virginia University 

LATIN. 

Professor Cannaday and Professor Hare. 

1. Elementary Latin. (5 Hrs.) Primarily intended for students 
who are preparing for law or medicine, but may be counted for credit 
toward the A.B. degree. An intensive course covering in one semester 
what is usually called First Year Latin. Much written work is re- 
quired in addition to classroom instruction. (21). 

First semester; M., T., W., Th., F., 8:00; and ]Vt, T., W., Th., F., 
9:00. Professor Cannaday, 29 W. 

2. Elementary Latin. (5 Hrs.) A continuation of Course 1. 
Text read will be Caesar or an equivalent. The course also calls for 
written work based upon the text read. (22). 

Second semester; M., T., W., Th., F., 8:00; and M., T., W., Th., 
F., 9:00. Professor Cannaday, 29 W. 

3. Cicero's Orations. (5 Hrs.) For freshmen or others offering 
two units for entrance. The first three orations against Catiline are 
read. (1). 

First semester; M., T., W., Th., F., 8:00. Professor Hare, 12 W. 

4. Cicero's Orations. (5 Hrs.) A continuation of Course 3. The 
orations read are the fourth against Catiline, the oration for Arehias 
and the Manilian Law. (2). 

Second semester; M., T., W., Th., F., 8:00. Professor Hare, 
12 W. 

5. Virgil. (4 Hrs.) For freshmen or others offering three units 
for entrance. The first three books of the Aeneid are read. Prose com- 
position once a week. (3). 

First semester; M., T., Th., F., 9:00. Professor Hare, 12 W. 

6. Virgil. (4 Hrs.) A continuation of Course 5. Books four, 
five and six of the Aeneid are read. (4). 

Second semester; M., T., Th., F., 9:00. Professor Hare, 12 W. 

7. Cicero's Essays. (2 Hrs.) For freshmen and others offer- 
ing four units of high 'school Latin or the preceding courses. Read- 
ings from the De Senectute, the De Amicitia, and the Tusculanae 
Disputationes . ( 5 ) . 

First semester; T., Th., 2:00. Professor Cannaday, 29 W. 

8. Cicero's Essays. (2 Hrs.) A continuation of Course 7. 
Further readings from the same essays. 

Second semester; T., Th., 2:00. Professor Cannaday, 29 W. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 151 

9. Livy. (3 Hrs.) Selections from Books XXL, XXIL, and I., 
with particular attention to Livy's conception of history and his liter- 
ary .style. (6). 

First semester; M., W., F., 2:00. Professor Cannaday, 29 W. 

10. Horace's Odes and Epodes. (3 Hrs.) Particular attention 
given to Horace's meters, his style, and his philosophy of life. (6). 

Second semester; M., W., F., 2:00. Professor Cannaday, 29 W. 

11. Teachers' Course. (2 Hrs.) A discussion of Latin in its 
relation to modern languages, questions of style, methods of trans- 
lation, methods of teaching, and other matters that concern the 
prospective teacher of Latin. (9). 

First semester; T., Th., 11:00. Professor Cannaday, 29 W. 

12. Teachers' Course. (2 Hrs.) A continuation of Course 11. 
(10). 

Second semester; T., Th., 11:00. Professor Cannaday, 29 W. 

13. Virgil's Georgics. (3 Hrs.) (7). 

First semester; M., W., F., 11:00. Professor Cannaday, 29 W. 

14. Roman Comedy. (3 Hrs.) Selected plays of Plautus and 
Terence. (8). 

Second semester; M., W., F., 11:00. Professor Cannaday, 29 W. 

15. Ovid. (3 Hrs.) Selections from the Metamorphoses. Offer- 
ed in alternate years instead of Course 13. (12). 

First semester; M., W., F., 11:00. Professor Cannaday, 29 W. 

16. Tacitus. (3 Hrs.) The Agricola and the Germania. Offered 
in alternate years instead of Course 14. 

Second semester; M., W., F., 11:00. Professor Cannaday, 29 W. 

31, (131). Horace's Satires and Epistles. (4 Hrs.) (11). 
First semester; M., T., Th., F., 10:00. Professor Cannaday, 

29 W. 

32, (132). Roman Life and Customs. (4 Hrs.) The basis for 
this study will be selected readings from the letters of Cicero and 
Pliny and the satires of Juvenal. (17). 

Second semester; M., T., Th., F., 10:00. Professor Cannaday, 
29 W. 



152 West Virginia University 

LIBRARY METHODS. 
Dr. Arnett. 

1. Library Methods. (2 Hrs.) An introductory course for the 
purpose of 'acquainting students with the University Library and the 
practice of library methods; instruction in the use of catalogues, in- 
dexes, and general reference books, and in the selection and purchase 
of books. 

First semester; T., Th., 8:00; L. 

2. Library Methods. (2 Hrs.) Theory and practice of library 
methods, including elementary cataloguing, classification, binding and 
repair of books, loan desk, etc. 

Second semester; T., Th., 8:00; L. 

3. Advanced Study and Practice in Library Methods. (2 Hrs.) 

Intended for those specializing for library work. Hours to be ar- 
ranged. 

MACHINE DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION. 

Courses 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 28 and 30 in Mechanical Drawing, 
course 26 in Descriptive Geometry, courses 27 and 9 in mechanism 
and madhinery and courses 46 and 47 in Industrial Management, of- 
fered in the College of Engineering are included in the list of Engi- 
neering subjects from which not to exceed 15 hours may be selected 
for credit in the College of Arts and Sciences. See announcements 
of the College of Engineering. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 153 

MATHEMATICS. 

Professor Eiesland, Assistant Professors Reynolds, Buchanan, and. 

Turner, Mr. Harkins, Mr. Davis, Miss Harshbarger and 

Mr. Crawford. 

2. Solid Geometry. (3 Hrs.) If offered to remove entrance con- 
ditions, one-half unit. 

First semester; T., Th., S., 10:00; Mr. Crawford, 225 M. H.; sec- 
ond semester; T., Th., S., 10:00, Mr. Crawford. 

3. Advanced Algebra. (3 Hrs.) 

First semester; for students in College of Arts and Sciences; 
M., W., F., 8:00 and 11:00; Mr. Davis and Mr. Crawford, 205 and 226 
M. H.; second semester, 11:00; also offered for students in the College 
of Engineering, (in connection with course 4); daily, 8:00, 9:00 and 
11:00; Professor Eiesland and staff; second semester; M., W., and 
F., 8:00, 9:00; Assistant Professor Turner, Mr. Harkins, Mr. Davis. 

4. Plane Trigonometry. (2 Hrs.) 

First and second semesters; for students in the College of Arts 
and Sciences; T., Th., 8:00 and 11:00; Mr. Harkins and Mr. Davis, 
205 and 226 M. H.; also offered for students in the College of Engi- 
neering (in connection with course 3); daily, 8:00, 9:00 and 11:00; 
Professor Eiesland and staff. 

5. Analytic Geometry. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisites: Courses 3 and 4. 

First semester; for students in the College of Engineering (in 
connection with course 6, daily, 9:00 and 11:00; Professor Eiesland 
and staff; for students in the College of Arts and Sciences and also 
in the College of Engineering; M., W., F., 8:00 and 11:00; Assistant 
Profesors Reynolds and Buchanan, 205 and 225 M. H. Second 
semester; for students in the College of Engineering and in the Col- 
lege of Arts and Sciences; M., W., F., 8:00, 9:00 and 11:00; Professor 
Eiesland and staff. 

6. Trigonometry and Topics in Advanced Algebra. (2 Hrs.) A 

continuation of courses 3 and 4, including topics in plane trigonometry 
and advanced algebra and also ten lessons in spherical trigonometry 
with application to the astronomical triangle. 

First semester; for students in the College of Engineering as well 
as for students in the College of Arts and Sciences; T., Th., 10:00; 
Mr. Davis, 300 M. H. Second semester, 8:00, 9:00, and 11:00; Pro- 
fessor Eiesland and staff. 



154 West Virginia University 

7. Differential and Integral Calculus. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisites: 
Courses 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6. 

First semester; M., W., F., conference hours, T., Th., 8:00, 9:00 
and 11:00; second semester, M., W., F., conference hours, T., Th., 
9:00 and 11:00. Professor Eiesland and staff. 

8. Differential and Integral Calculus. (3 Hrs.) A continuation 
of course 7. 

First semester; M., W., F., conference hours, T., Th., 9:00 and 
11:00. Second semester; M., W., F., conference hours, T., Th., 8:00, 
9:00 and 11:00. Professor Eiesland and staff. 

NOTE: In courses 7 and 8, the part denoted as "conference," 
two hours weekly, is not intended to increase the amount of prepared 
work. It really amounts to two hours weekly of study in preparation 
for the regular class recitation with the help and guidance of the 
teacher. Attendance at these conferences is required. 

25. Elementary Mathematical Analysis. (5 Hrs.) Prerequisites: 
Elementary algebra and plane geometry. 

First semester; 8:00 and 11:00. Mr. Harkins and Mr. Davis. 

26. Elementary Mathematical Analysis. (3 Hrs.) A continu- 
ation of course 26. 

Second semester; M., W., F., 8:00 and 11:00. Mr. Harkins and 
Mr. Davis. 

27. Elementary Mathematical Analysis. (2 Hrs.) This course 
may be elected by students who have had course 25 and are pursuing 
course 26. (28). 

Second semester; M., W., F., 11:00. Mr. Harkins, 300 M. H. 

Course's 25 and 26, or 3, 4 and 2 ! 8, or else 3, 4 and 29 may he 
chosen by those students who wish to take 8 hours of mathematics 
for the requirement of 'group 4 (physics, chemistry, mathematics). 

28. Mathematical Theory of Investment. (3 Hrs.) Primarily 
for students in economics and sociology. The following are among 
the topics treated: Theory of series and logarithms, interest and 
annuities, amortization, valuation of bonds, sinking funds and depre- 
ciation, theory of probability, life insurance. Prerequisites: A fair 
knowledge of algebra through quadratics. (23). 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. Assistant Professor 
Reynolds, 205 M. H. 

Courses 3, 4 and 28 will satisfy the requirement for group 4. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 155 

29. Mathematics for Agriculture and General Science. (3 Hrs.) 

Primarily for students of agriculture and biological science. The 
course includes such topics as the following: theory of probability, 
calculation of errors, laws of heredity. Prerequisites: Courses 3 and 
4, or 25, 26. (22). 

First or second semester; hours to be arranged; M., W., F., 
Professor Eiesland. 

Courses 3, 4 and 29 will satisfy the requirements for group 4. 

30. Teachers' Course in Secondary School Mathematics. (3 Hrs.) 

This course is devoted to the study of the logical structure of ele- 
mentary algebra, plane and solid geometry with particular reference 
to the problems of teaching these subjects in high schools. Taken 
with course 31 it may be counted toward a major in the Department 
of Education. Prerequisites: eight hours of mathematics such as 
courses 25 and 26 or 3, 4 and 5. (27). 

First semester; M., W., F., 3:00. Assistant Professor Reynolds. 

31. Teacher's Course in Secondary School Mathematics. (2 Hrs.) 
Continuation of course 30. (27). 

Second semester; T., Th., 3:00. Assistant Professor Reynolds. 

Courses 30 and 31 may be counted toward a major in the Depart- 
ment of Education. 

40, (140). Differential Equations. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisites: 
Courses 7 and 8. (9). 

Second semester; M., W., F., 1:00. Professor Eiesland, 300 M. 
H. 

41, (141). Theory of Determinants and Analytic Geometry of 
Space. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisites: Courses 7, 8. (10). 

First semester; T., Th., 3:00. Assistant Professor Turner, 114 
M. H. 

42, (142). Advanced Topics in Calculus. (2 Hrs.) (11). 
Second semester; T., Th., 3:00. Assistant Professor Buchanan, 

205 M. H. 

43, (143). Projective Geometry. (3 Hrs.) (12). 

Second semester; M., W., F., 3:00. Assistant Professor Turner, 
114 M. H. 

Courses 40, 41, 42, and 43 are required of all students taking 
mathematics as a major study. In special cases courses 30 and 31 
may be substituted for 42 and 43. The same courses may also be 
elected as minors by students doing graduate work in physics or 



156 West Virginia University 

chemistry. Courses 40 and 42 are especially recommended for those 
who expect to take up advanced work in physical chemistry, mathe- 
matical physics or theory of electricity. 

51, (151). Descriptive Astronomy. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisites: 

Courses 7, 8. 

Second semester; M., W., F., 3:00. Professor Eiesland, 300 M. 
H. 

52, (152). Practical Astronomy. (1 Hr.) Sextant work and 
work with a portable transit. 

Second semester; T., 1:00. Professor Eiesland. 

180. High Plane Curves with Special Reference to Curves of the 
Third and Fourth Order. (3 Hrs.) (55). 

First semester; M., W., F., 4:00. Assistant Professor Turner. 

181. Higher Plane Curves. Continuation of course 180. (56). 
Second semester; M., W., F., 4:00. Assistant Professor Turner. 

182. Introduction to the Theory of Functions of a Complex Vari- 
able. (3 Hrs.) (57). 

First semester; M., W., F., 4:00. Assistant Professor Buchanan. 

183. Introduction to the Theory of Functions of a Complex Vari- 
able. (3 Hrs.) Continuation of course 182. (58). 

Second semester; M., W., F., 4:00. Assistant Professor 
Buchanan. 

184. Differential Geometry and Theory of Surfaces. (3 Hrs.) 

(59). 

First semester; M., W., F., 3:00. Professor Eiesland. 

185. Differential Geometry and Theory of Surfaces. (3 Hrs.) 
('60). 

Second semester; M., W., F., 3:00. Professor Eiesland. 

186. Introduction to the Theory of Integral Equations. (3 Hrs.) 
(63). 

First semester; hours to be arranged. Assistant Professor 
Reynolds. 

187. Introduction to the Theory of Integral Equations. (3 Hrs.) 

(64). 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. Assistant Professor 
Reynolds. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 157 

188. Mathematical Seminar. (2 Hrs.) (51). 

First semester; hours to be arranged. Assistant Professor 
Buchanan. 

189. Mathematical Seminar. (2 Hrs.) (52). 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. Assistant Professor 
Reynolds. 

190. Vector Analysis, (a Hrs.) (66). 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Eiesland. 

191. Linear and Quadratic Line Complexes. (3 Hrs.) Methods 
of Plucker, Klein and Lie. Prerequisites: Courses 184 and 185. (71). 
(Omitted 1924-25). 

First semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Eiesland. 

192. Linear and Quadratic Line Complexes. Continuation of 
course 191. (72). (Omitted 1924-25). 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Eiesland. 

193. Algebraic Geometry and Theory of Abelian Integrals. (3 
Hrs.) (79). 

First semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Eiesland. 

194. Algebraic Geometry and Abelian Integrals. (3 Hrs.) (70). 
Second semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Eiesland. 

MECHANICS. 

Courses 70, 71, 72, and 73 are included in the list of Engineering 
subjects from which not to exceed 15 hours may be selected for 
credit in the College of Arts and Sciences. See announcements of 
the College of Engineering. 

MINING ENGINEERING. 

Credit will be given in the College of Arts and Sciences for 
course 98 in geological surveying offered in the College of Engineer- 
ing. For detailed announcement of this course see the announcements 
of that college. 

MUSIC. 

Credit not to exceed fifteen hours in all will be given in the Col- 
lege of Arts and Sciences for courses in music offered in the School 
of Music. For detailed announcements of these courses see the an- 
nouncements of the School of Music. 



158 West Virginia University 

PHILOSOPHY AND PSYCHOLOGY. 

Professors Cunningham and Winter. 

The work of the Department of Philosophy is intended to afford 
a means of culture and to serve as an organizing factor in general 
education. 

The courses in psychology are planned (1) to meet the need of 
students who desire an acquaintance with the elementary principles 
of psychology and their relation to the larger .social and scientific 
interests of modern life; (2) to prepare students for the application 
of those principles to philosophy, education and the 'sciences. 

Students electing philosophy as the major subject must take at 
least 25 hours of work in the deparmtent, except that 20 hours will be 
accepted from those who elect law in the senior year or who elect 
ten or more hours in the Department of Education. 

The first eight hours in the department must include one course 
in psychology and course 15 or its equivalent. This rule does not 
apply to pre-Jaw students. 

Philosophy. 

2. Logic. ,.(2 Hrs|) The application of the principles of rea- 
soning to some of the physical and social sciences. For pre^legal 
students and others interested in elementary scientific method. Pre- 
requisite: Psychology 1. (2). 

First semester; T., Th., 8:00. Professor Cunningham, 36 L. 

4. Introduction to Philosophy. (3 Hrs.) Not open to freshmen. 
A treatment of the problems of philosophy in their historical and 
social setting. Prerequisite: Psychology 1. (4). 

Both semesters; M., W., F., 11:00. Professor Cunningham, 36 
L. 

6. Logic. (3 Hrs.) A study of the principles of deductive and 
inductive logic. Prerequisite: Psychology 1. (2). 

Second semester; M., W., F., 8:00. Professor Cunningham, 36 
L. 

8. The Development of Religion. (2 Hrs.) A study of religion 
in its physical, psychological, and social backgrounds. Prerequisites: 
Psychology 1 and Philosophy 15 or Philosophy 2. (8). 

Second semester; T., Th., 9:00. Professor Cunningham, 36 L. 

11. Ethics. (3 Hrs.) A consideration of morality from the his- 
torical, theoretical, and practical standpoints. Prerequisites: Psy- 
chology 1 and Philosophy 15 or Philosophy 2. (5). 

First semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Professor Cunningham, 36 L. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 159 

12, Ancient and Medieval Thought. (3 Hrs.) Open to seniors 
and graduate students. Prerequisites: Psychology 1, Philosophy 15, 
and Philosophy 2. (7). 

First semester; M., W., P., 2:00. Professor Cunningham, 36 L. 

13, (113). Modern Thought. (3 Hrs.) Open to seniors and 
graduate students. Prerequisites: Psychology 1, Philosophy 15, and 
Philosophy 2. (8). 

Second semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Professor Cunningham, 36 
L. 

14, (114). Contemporary Thought. (2 Hrs.) Open to seniors 
and graduate students. The idealistic, the realistic, and the pragmatic 
types of thought are considered. Considerable knowledge of mathe- 
matics, physics, and biology desirable. Prerequisites: Psychology 1, 
Philosophy 15, and either Philosophy 2, 7, or 8. (9). 

First semester; M., F., 10:00. Professor Cunningham, 36 L. 

17, (117). Metaphysics. (2 Hrs.) Open to seniors and graduate 
students. A critical study of a selected system of thought. Pre- 
requisites: Psychology 1, Philosophy 2, Philosophy 15, and one course 
from Philosophy 7, 8 and 9. (4). 

Second semester; T., Th., 2:00. Professor Cunningham, 36 L. 

Psychology. 

1. Introduction to Psychology. (3 Hrs.) Not open to freshmen. 
This course is designed to familiarize the student with the principal 
phenomena and principles of mental life, and is prerequisite to all 
other courses in psychology and philosophy. 

First and second semesters; section A, M., W., F., 8:00; section 
B, M., W., F., 9:00. Professor Winter, 33 L. 

10. Applied Psychology. (2 Hrs.) A study of the application of 
psychology to law, medicine, advertising, salesmanship, buying and 
personal efficiency. Prerequisite: Course 1. (20). 

Second semester; T., Th., 11:00. Professor Winter, 33 L. 

12. Experimental Psychology. (2 Hrs.) This course gives the 
student a general acquaintance with experimental psychology. It in- 
cludes lectures, collateral reading and experiments. Prerequisite: 
Course 1. 

First and second semesters; T., Th., 2:00-4:00. Professor Win- 
ter, 33 L. 



160 West Virginia University 

16. Social Psychology. (3 Hrs.) A study of the psychological 
factors in social life, including an inquiry into the foundation for the 
divergent types of thinking in conflicting groups. Prerequisite: 
Course 1. 

First semester; M., W., F., 11:00. Professor Winter, 33 L. 

29. Abnormal Psychology. (2 Hrs.) A study of the variants of 
normal consciousness in their relation to normal mental life. Pre- 
requisite: Course 1. (Omitted in 1924-25). 

Second semester; T., Th., 11:00. Professor Winter, 33 L. 

30, (130). Advanced Psychology. (3 Hrs.) Open to seniors and 
graduates. A critical constructive study of systematic psychology. 
Prerequisites: Courses 1 and 12. (18). 

Second semester; M., W., F., 11:00. Professor Winter, 33 L. 

40, (140). History of Psychology. (2 Hrs.) Open to seniors and 
graduates. A survey of the development of psychological theory 
with special emphasis upon modern psychological problems. Pre- 
requisites : Course 1 in psychology and courses 7 and 8 in philosophy. 
(19). 

First semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Winter, 33 L. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR WOMEN. 

Miss Griffin. 

1. Physical Training and Hygiene. (1 Hr.) Primarily for stu- 
dents who 'have had no previous physical training. 

First semester; M., T., W., Th., F., 3:00; M., W., F., 4:00. Other 
hours to be arranged. 

2. Physical Training and Hygiene. (1 Hr.) 
Second semester; hours as in Course 1. 

5. Physical Training and Hygiene. (1 Hr.) Prerequisite: 
Courses 1 and 2. 

First semester; T., Th., 4:00; other hours to be arranged. 

6. Physical Training and Hygiene. (1 Hr.) 

Second semester; T., Th., 4:00; other hours to be arranged. 

7. Teaching of Physical Education. (1 Hr.) Open to students 
who have completed one year of college physical education. The 
course is adapted to the needs of prospective teachers, playground 
instructors, and assistants in summer camp work. 

First semester; M., W., F., 1:00. 

8. Teaching of Physical Education. (1 Hr.) 
Second semester; M., W., J?., 1:00. 

9. Athletics (no credit). Field hockey, basket ball, volley ball, 
baseball, tennis, track and field. 

Hours to be arranged. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 161 

PHYSICS. 

Professor Colwell, Professor Molby, Associate Professor George 
and Mr. Harry Hill. 

The various courses offered in Physics are designed to meet the 
needs of the students in the Colleges of Arts and Sciences, Agricul- 
ture, and Engineering, and in the School of Medicine. For students 
who expect to teach Physics the laboratory offers facilities for indi- 
vidual laboratory work and the construction of apparatus. 

1. Introductory Physics. (3 Hrs.) Primarily for freshmen. 
Required for students in the College of Agriculture and the School of 
Medicine. See Course 3 below. Prerequisite: plane geometry. 

First semester; lectures, M., W., F., 8:00. Professor Molby and 
staff, 20 M. 

2. Introductory Physics. (3 Hrs.) A continuation of Course 1 
which is a prerequisite. See Course 4 below. (3). 

Second semester; lectures, M., W., F., 8:00. Professor Molby 
and staff, 20 M. 

3. Introductory Physical Laboratory. (1 Hr.) ..This course ac- 
companies and is required of all students who take Course 1. One 
laboratory period per week. (2). 

First semester; various sections as announced in the semester 
schedule. Professor Colwell and staff, 21 M. 

4. Introductory Physical Laboratory. (1 Hr.) A continuation 
of Course 3, which is a prerequisite. 

Second semester; various sections as announced in the semester 
schedule. Professor Colwell and staff, 21 M. 

5. General Physics. (4 Hrs.) Required of all candidates for 
engineering degrees, and recommended for all students who major in 
physics, mathematics, or chemistry. Not open to students who have 
credit in Course 1. Prerequisites: trigonometry and analytic geo- 
metry. No student is permitted to take this course without its ac- 
companying laboratory exercise, which is Course 7. (6). 

First semester; section 1, T., W., Th., F., 9:00; Associate Pro- 
fessor George and staff; section 2, M., T., Th., F., 10:00; Professor 
Colwell and staff, 20 M. 

6. General Physics. (4 Hrs.) A continuation of Course 5. Not 
open to students who have credit for Courses 1 and 2. No. student 



162 West Virginia University 

is permitted to take this course without its accompanying laboratory 
exercise, which is Course 8. (8). 

Second semester; section 1, T., W., Th., F., 9:00; Associate Pro- 
fessor George and staff; section 2, M., T., Th., F., 10:00; Professor 
Colwell and staff, 20 M. 

7. General Physical Laboratory. (1 Hr.) This is a companion 
course for Physics 5. 

First semester; various sections as announced in the semester 
schedule. Professor Colwell and staff, 21 M. 

8. General Physical Laboratory. (1 Hr.) A continuation of 
Course 7. 

Second semester; various sections as announced in semester 
schedule. Professor Colwell and staff, 21 M. 

13. Introductory Radio-Telegraphy and Radio-Telephony. (3 

Hrs.) Prerequisites: Physics 1,, 2, 3, and 4, or the equivalent. 

First semester; M., W., F., 8:00. Professor Colwell, 16 M. 

14. Introductory Radio-Telegraphy and Radio-Telephony. (3 
Hrs.) A continuation of Course 13 which is prerequisite. 

Second semester; M., W., F., 8:00. Professor Colwell, 16 M. 

16. Photography. (2 Hrs.) Open to all students of the Univer- 
sity. One lecture and one laboratory exercise a week. (12). 

Second semester; lectures, Th., 4:00; laboratory hours to be ar- 
ranged. Professor Molby, 20 M. 

17. General Laboratory. (2 Hrs.) This course is designed to 
meet the needs of students 'who desire more laboratory work than 
that offered in Physics 3, 4, 7, and 8. Prerequisites: either courses 
3 and 4 or courses 7 and 8. (14). 

First semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Molby. 

18. General Laboratory. (2 Hrs.) Same as Course 17. 
Second semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Molby. 

21,(121). Light. (3 Hrs.) Lectures and laboratory work. This 
course is designed to meet the needs of students in general biology, 
chemistry and medicine. Prerequisites: Physics 1, 2, 3, 4, and trigo- 
nometry, or physics 5, 6, 7 and 8. Open to graduates as a minor. (9). 

First semester; M., F., 10:00; laboratory hours to be arranged. 
Professor Molby, 16 M. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 163 

23, Electrical Measurements. (3 Hrs.) This course is designed 
for and required of the candidates for the degree of B.S.M.E. and 
B.S.Chem.E. Prerequisites: Physics 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5, 6, 7 and 8, and 
integral calculus. (10). 

First semester; lectures, T., Th., 11:00; laboratory, W., 2:00-5:00. 
Professor Colwell, 16 M. and 5 M. 

24, (124). Radio-Telegraphy and Radio- Telephony. (4 Hrs.) 

Open to seniors. Elective for seniors in electrical engineering. Stu- 
dents spend one evening (8:00-11:00) each week in the laboratory in 
addition to the regular required laboratory work. Prerequisites: 
Physics 1, 2, 3, and 4 or its equivalent and integral calculus. (11). 

Second semester; T., Th., 11:00; laboratory, W., 2:00-5:00. Pro- 
fessor Colwell, 16 M. 

25, (125). Modern Electrical Theory. (3 Hrs.) Designed es- 
pecially for students majoring in the natural sciences. Open to all 
seniors. Prerequisites: Physics 1, 2, 3, and 4 or 5, 6, 7, and 8. 

First semester; M., W., F., 11:00. Associate Professor George, 
15 M. 

26, (126). Modern Electrical Theory. (3 Hrs.) Continuation of 
Course 25. 

Second semester; M., W., F., 11:00. Associate Professor George, 
15 M. 

31, (131). Theoretical Mechanics. (3 Hrs.) Open to seniors. 
Prerequisites: Physics 1, 2, 3, and 4 or 5, 6, 7, and 8, and integral cal- 
culus. (16). 

First semester; hours to be arranged. Associate Professor 
George, 15 M. 

32, (132). Heat and Wave Motion. (3 Hrs.) Open to seniors. 
Prerequisites: Physics 23 and integral calculus. (18). 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. Associate Professor 
George, 15 M. 

33, (133). Electricity and Magnetism. (3 Hrs.) Open to seniors. 
Prerequisites: Physics 5, 6, 7, and 8 and integral calculus. (20). 

First semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Colwell, 16 M. 

34, (134). Electricity and Magnetism. (3 Hrs.) A continuation 
of Course 33, which is prerequisite. (21). 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Colwell, 16 
M. 



164 West Virginia University 

41, 43, 45, 47, (141, 143, 145, 147). Physics Seminar. (1 Hr.) 
Open to seniors and 'graduates. A discussion of the modern researches 
in Physics. (22). 

First semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Col well, 16 M. 

42, 44, 46, 48, (142, 144, 146, 148). Physics Seminar. (1 Hr.) 
Similar to Course 41. (23). 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Col well, 16 

M. 

49, (149). Intermediate Laboratory. (2 Hrs.) Open to seniors 
who major in Physics. Prerequisites: 5, 6, 7, and 8. 

First semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Col well. 

50, (150). Intermediate Laboratory. (2 Hrs.) A continuation 
of Course 49. 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Colwell. 

181. Physical Optics. (3 Hrs.) (30). 

First semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Molby, 21 M. 

182. Physical Optics. (3 Hrs.) (31). 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Molby, 21 M. 

183. Kinetic Theory of Gases and Molecular Physics. (3 Hrs.) 
(32). 

First semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Colwell, 16 M. 

184. Kinetic Theory of Gases an d Molecular Physics. (3 Hrs.) 
(33). 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Colwell, 
16 M. 

185. The Electron Theory. (3 Hrs.) (34). 

First semester; hours to be arranged. Associate Professor 
George, 15 M. 

186. The Electron Theory. (3 Hrs.) Continuation of Course 
185. (35). 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. Associate Professor 
George, 15 M. 

187. Radioactivity. (3 Hrs.) (36). 

First semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Molby, 16 M. 

188. Radio- Activity. (3 Hrs.) Continuation of Course 187. (37). 
Second semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Molby, 16 M. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 165 

189. Conduction of Electricity Through Gases. (3 Hrs.) (38). 

First semester; hours to be arranged. Associate Professor 
George, 20 M. 

190. Conduction of Electricity Through Gases. (3 Hrs.) Con- 
tinuation of Course 189. (39). 

Second semester ; hours to be arranged. Associate Professor 
George, 20 M. 

191. Electric Waves. (3 Hrs.) 

First semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Colwell, 16 M. 

192. Electric Waves. (3 Hrs.) Continuation of Course 191. 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Colwell, 

16 M. 

193. Experimental Research. (Credit according to work done 
but not to exceed 10 hours in all). Required of all candidates for 
master of arts degree with major in physics. (40). 

First semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Colwell, 16 M. 

194. Experimental Research. Continuation of Course 193. (40). 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Colwell, 
16 M. 

NOTE: Not more than one of the purely graduate courses offer- 
ed by any one instructor will be given in any one semester. 

It is highly desirable that candidates for the master's degree 
should have a reading knowledge of both French and German. 

PLANT PATHOLOGY. 

Courses 1 and 4 in Plant Pathology are included in the list of 
Agricultural courses from which not to exceed 15 hours may be 
selected for credit in the College of Arts and Sciences. 'See announce- 
ments of the College of Agriculture. 

POULTRY HUSBANDRY. 

Poultry Husbandry 1 is included in the list of Agricultral sub- 
jects from which not more than 15 hours may be selected for credit 
in the College of Arts and Sciences. See announcements of the Col- 
lege of Agriculture. 



166 West Virginia University 

PUBLIC SPEAKING. 

Professor Kay, Mrs. Fear, Mr. Buchanan. 

Fundamentals. 

I. General Course. (2 Hrs.) This course or its equivalent is 
a prerequisite for all 'subsequent courses. (3). 

First semester; T., Th., 9:00, 1:00; M., F., 10:00. Mrs. Fear, 
34 M. 

Second semester; T., Th., 9:00; M., F., 10:00. Mrs. Fear, 34 M. 

3. Declamation. (2 Hrs.) (4). 

First semester; T., Th., 9:00; 10:00. 

Second semester; T., Th., 9:00. Mr. Buchanan. 

5. Forensics. (2 Hrs.) For pre-law students. 
First semester; M., F., 10:00. Mr. Buchanan. 

6. Im personation. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisite for Courses in Play 
production. (6). 

Second semester; T., Th., 10.00. Mrs. Fear, 33 M. 

Original Address. 

II. Effective Speaking. (3 Hrs.) (12). 

Both semesters; M., W., F., 8:00, 9:00. Mr. Buchanan. , 

13. Argumentation. (3 Hrs.) (14). 

Both semesters; M., W., F., 9:00. Professor Kay, 33 M. 

15. The Occasional Address.* (2 Hrs.) (13). 

First semester; T., Th., 10:00. Professor Kay, 33 M. 

16. The Oration. (2 Hrs.) Juniors, seniors and graduates. (16). 
Second semester; M., F., 10:00. Mr. Buchanan, 34 M. 

17. The Extemporaneous Address. (2 Hrs.) Juniors and seniors. 
(10). 

First semester; T., Th., 11:00. Professor Kay, 33 M. 

18. The Public Discussion. (2 Hrs.) Juniors and seniors. (11). 
Second semester; T., Th., 11:00. Professor Kay, 33 M. 

20. Debating. (2 Hrs.) (15). 

Second semester; M., W., 4:00. Professor Kay. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 167 

Literary Interpretation. 

21. The Art of Reading Aloud. (3 Hrs.) (21). 
First semester; M., W., F., 11:00. Mrs. Fear, 34 M. 

22. Reading Poetry. (3 Hrs.) Juniors, seniors and graduates. 
(22). 

Second semester; M., W., F., 11:00. Professor Kay, 33 M. 

23. Reading Plays. (3 Hrs.) Juniors, seniors and graduates. 
(22). 

First semester; M., W., F., 11:00. Professor Kay, 33 M. 

24. How to Teach Reading in the Public Schools. (2 Hrs.) Sen- 
iors and graduates. 

Second semester; T., Th., 10:00. Professor Kay, 33 M. 

25. The Art of Story Telling. (2 Hrs.) (20). 
Both semesters; T., Th., 11:00. Mrs. Fear. 

27. Professional Reading. (2 Hrs.) For senior Public Speak- 
ing majors only. 

Both semesters; hours to be arranged. 

Play Production. 

31. The One-act Play. (3 Hrs.) (23). 

First semester; M., W., F., 2:00. Mrs. Fear, 34 M. 

32. The Actional Study of Classic Drama. (3 Hrs.) 
Second semester; M., W., F., 2:00. Mrs. Fear, 34 M. 

33. Coaching and Managing Plays. (2 Hrs.) 
First semester; T., Th., 1:00. Mr Buchanan. 

34. The Actional Study of Modern Drama. (3 Hrs.) (24). 
Second semester; (not offered in 1925-26). 

36. Community Drama and Pageantry. (3 Hrs.) 
Second semester; M., W., F., 11:00. Mr. Buchanan. 

Extra Curricular Credit. 

A credit of 1 or 2 hours in a semester may be given by the head 
of the department for such outside activity as intercollegiate debat- 
ing, taking part in the public performance of a major play when the 
work done has been assigned and supervised by an instructor in the 
department. 



168 West Virginia University 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES. 

Professors Stathers, Professor Darby, Associate Professor Spiker, 

Assistant Professor Miller, Assistant Professor Mitrani, Mr. 

Grimes, Mr. McGee, Mr. Brown, Mr. Barker. 

French. 

1. Elementary French. (5 Hrs.)' Primarily for freshmen. 
First semester; sections at 8:00, 9:00, 11:00 and 2:00. Professor 

Darby, Mr. McGee, Mr. Barker. 

2. Intermediate French. (5 Hrs.) Primarily for freshmen. A 
continuation of Course 1. 

Second semester; sections at 8:00, 9:00, 11:00 and 2:00. Pro- 
fessor Darby, Mr. McGee, Mr. Barker. 

3. Grammar Review and Composition. (2 Hrs.) For freshmen 
and sophomores. Given in connection with Course 5. 

First semester; sections T., Th., at 8:00, 9:00, 11:00 and 2:00. 
Professor Darby, Assistant Professor Miller, Mr. McGee, Mr. Bar- 
ker. 

4. Advanced Grammar and Composition. (2 Hrs.) For fresh- 
men and sophomores. Given in connection with Course 6. (4). 

Second semester; sections T., Th., at 8:00, 9:00, 11:00 and 2:00. 
Professor Darby, Assistant Professor Miller, Mr. McGee, Mr. Bar- 
ker. 

5. Fiction of the 19th Century. (3 Hrs.) For freshmen and 
sophomores. (3). 

First semester; sections M., W., F., at 8:00, 9:00, 11:00 and 2:00. 
Professor Darby, Associate Professor Spiker, Mr. McGee, Mr. Bar- 
ker. 

6. Drama of the 19th Century. (3 Hrs.) For freshmen and 
sophomores. 

Second semester; sections, M., W., F., at 8:00, 9:00, 11:00 and 
2:00. Professor Darby, Associate Professor Spiker, Mr. McGee, Mr. 
Barker. 

13. Syntax and Conversation. (2 Hrs.) For sophomores and 
juniors. (9). 

First semester; T., Th., 9:00. Professor Stathers, 11 W. 

14. Advanced Discourse. (2 Hrs.) For sophomores and juniors. 
(10). 

Second semester; T., Th., 9:00. Professor Stathers, 11 W. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 169 

15. The Classical School. (3 Hrs.) For sophomores and juniors. 
(7). 

First semester; sections, M., W., F., at 8:00, 9:00 and 11:00. 
Professor Darby, Associate Professor Spiker, Assistant Professor 
Miller. 

16. The Classical School after Moliere. (3 Hrs.) For sopho- 
mores and juniors. (8). 

Second semester; sections, M., W., F., at 8:00, 9:00 and 11:00. 
Professor Darby, Associate Professor Spiker, Assistant Professor 
Miller. 

21, (121). The Romantic Movement. (3 Hrs.) For juniors, sen- 
iors and graduates. (11). 

First semester; M., W., F., 11:00. Professor Stathers, 11 W. 

22, (122). French Literature Since 1850. (3 Hrs.) For juniors, 
seniors and graduates. (12). 

Second semester; M., W., F., 11:00. Professor Stathers, 11 W. 

23, (123). The Contemporary Drama. (2 Hrs.) For juniors, 
seniors and graduates. (17). 

First semester; T., Th., 9:00. Professor Darby, 14 W. 

24, (124). Historical Novel in the 19th Century. (2 Hrs.) For 
juniors, seniors and graduates. (18). 

Second semester; T., Th., 9:00. Professor Darby, 14 W. 

29, (129). Literature of the 16th Century. (2 Hrs.) For sen- 
iors and graduates. (20). 

First semester; T., Th., 8:00. Professor Spiker, 13 W. 

30, (130). The 16th Century after 1550. (2 Hrs.) For seniors 
and graduates. (20). 

Second semester; T., Th., 8:00. Associate Professor Spiker, 
13 W. 

31, (131). Advanced Composition and Phonetics. (2 Hrs.) For 
seniors and graduates. (16). 

First semester; T., Th., 11:00. Professor. Stathers, 11 W. 

32, (132). Problems in Teaching French. (2 Hrs.) For seniors 
and graduates. (16). 

Second semester; T., Th., 11:00. Professor Stathers, 11 W. 

195. Seminar. (2-5 Hrs.) For graduates. 

First semester; hour to be arranged. Professor Stathers, 11 
W. 

196. Seminar. (2-5 Hrs.) For graduates. 

Second semester; hour to be arranged. Professor Stathers, 11 
W. 



170 West Virginia University 



Spanish. 



1. Elementary Spanish. (5 Hrs.) For freshmen and sopho- 
mores. (41). 

First semester; sections at 8:00, 9:00, 10:00, (except on Wed- 
nesdays), 11:00 and 2:00. Associate Professor Spiker, Assistant 
Professor Miller, Mr. Grimes, Mr. Brown. 

2. Intermediate Spanish. (5 Hrs.) For freshmen and sopho- 
mores. (52). 

Second semester; sections at 8:00, 9:00, 10:00, (except on Wed- 
nesdays), 11:00 and 2:00. Associate Professor Spiker, Assistant 
Professor Miller, Mr. Grimes, Mr. Brown. 

3. Grammar Review and Composition. (2 Hrs.) For freshmen 
and sophomores. Given in connection with Course 5. 

First semester; sections, T., Th., 8:00, 9:00, 10:00 and 11:00. 
Associate Professor Spiker, Mr. Grimes, Mr. Brown. 

4. Advanced Grammar and Composition. (2 Hrs.) For freshmen 
and sophomores. Given in connection with Course 6. (46). 

Second semester; sections T., Th., 8:00, 9:00, 10:00 and 11:00. 
Associate Professor Spiker, Mr. Grimes, Mr. Brown. 

5. Contemporary Fiction. (3 Hrs.) For freshmen and sopho- 
mores. (50). 

First semester; sections M., W., F., 8:00, 9:00, 11:00. Assistant 
Professor Miller, Mr. Grimes, Mr. Brown. 

6. Drama of the 19th Century. (3 Hrs.) For freshmen and 
sophomores. (45). 

Second semester; sections M., W., F., 8:00, 9:00, 11:00. Assis- 
tant Professor Miller, Mr. Grimes, Mr. Brown. 

13. Syntax and Conversation. (2 Hrs.) For sophomores and 
juniors. (Omitted, 1925-26). (53). 

First semester; M., F., 10:00. Assistant Professor Mitrani. 

14. Composition and Conversation. (2 Hrs.) For sophomores 
and juniors. (Omitted, 1925-26). (54). 

Second semester; M., F., 10:00. Assistant Professor Mitrani. 

15, (115). Lyric Poetry. (3 Hrs.) For juniors, seniors, and 
graduates. (Omitted, 1925-26). 

First semester; M., W., F., 8:00. Assistant Professor Mitrani. 

16, (116). Civilization and Culture. (3 Hrs.) For juniors, sen- 
i ors and gradu a t e s . ( Om fated , 1925-26). 

Second semester; M., W., F., 8:00. Assistant Professor Mitrani. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 171 

21, (121). Literature of the Golden Age. (3 Hrs.) For seniors 
and graduates. (43). 

First semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Professor Stathers, 11 W. 

22, (122). The Golden Age after Lope de Vega. (3 Hrs.) For 

seniors and graduates. (43). 

Second semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Professor Stathers, 11 W. 

23, (123). Spanish American Literature. (2 Hrs.) For seniors 
and graduates. (Omitted, 1925-26). (51). 

First semester; T., Th., 8:00. Assistant Professor Mitrani. 

24, (124). Spanish American Literature. (2 Hrs.) For seniors. 
A continuation of Course 23. (Omitted, 1925-26). (52). 

Second semester; T., Th., 8:00. Assistant Professor Mitrani. 

195. Literature of the 16th Century. (3 Hrs.) (Omitted, 1925- 
26). 

First semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Professor Stathers, 11 W. 

196. Old Spanish. (3 Hrs.) (Omitted, 1925-26). (48). 
Second semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Professor Stathers, 11 W. 

SOILS. 

Course 1 in Soil Fertility is included in the list of Agricultural 
subjects from which not to exceed 15 hours may be selected for 
credit in the College of Arts and Sciences. See announcements of 
the College of Agriculture. 

STEAM, GAS AND EXPERIMENTAL ENGINEERING. 

Course 121 in Thermodynamics and course 127 in heating and 
ventilating are included in the list of Engineering subjeccts from 
which not to exceed 15 hours may be selected for credit in the Col- 
lege of Arts and Sciences. See announcements of the College of En- 
gineering. 



172 West Virginia University 

ZOOLOGY. 

Professor Reese, Professor Chidester and Assistant Professor 

Taylor. 

Courses 1, 2, 18 and 10 are of especial interest to teachers. 
Courses 1 and 2 are required of students preparing to enter the 
study of medicine; Course 4 is required of students in agriculture. 

NOTE : For description of zoological laboratories see page 27 
of the University catalogue. 

1. Animal Biology. (4 Hrs.) A study chiefly of invertebrate 
animals, with an introduction to the vertebrates. Hegner's College 
Zoology. 

First semester; recitation, T., Th., 8:00 or T., Th., 9:00; lab- 
oratory, first section, M., F., 2:00-4:30; second section, T., Th., 2:00- 
4:30; third section, W., 2:00-4:30; S., 9:00-11:30. Professor Reese, 
Professor Chidester and Assistant Professor Taylor, 49, 50 and 51 
W. 

2. Vertebrate Zoology. (4 Hrs.) Prerequisite: Zoology 1 or an 
equivalent. 

Second semester; recitation T., Th., 8:00, or T., Th., 9:00; lab- 
oratory, first section, M., F., 2:00-4:30; second section, T. ? Th., 2:00- 
4:30; Professor Reese, Professor Chidester and Assistant Professor 
Taylor, 49, 50 and 51 W. 

4. Elementary Zoology. (5 Hrs.) For students in the College 
of Agriculture only. Hegner's College Zoology. (24). 

Second semester; recitations, M., W., F., 8:00; laboratory, W., 
2:00-4:30; S., 9:00-11:30. Professor Chidester and assistants. 

7. Vertebrate Embryology. (3 Hrs.) Reese's Vertebrate Em- 
bryology. Prerequisite: Course 2 or an equivalent. (6). 

First semester; T., Th., 2:00-5:00. Professor Reese, 47 W. 

10, (110). Principles of Biology. (3 Hrs.) Newman's Evolu- 
tion, Genetics and Eugenics. Prerequisite: Zoology 1 or an equiva- 
lent, except by special permission. 

Second semester; M., W., F., 9:00. Professor Chidester, 46 W. 

16. Economic Zoology. (2 Hrs.) Reese's Economic Zoology. 
Zoology 1 and 2, advised' as prerequisite, but not required of upper 
classmen. (21). 

Second semester; T., Th., 11:00. Professor Reese, 46 W. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 173 

18. Methods of Zoology. (2 or 3 Hrs.) A practical course in 
the methods of collecting, preserving, injecting, making microscopic 
preparations, etc. Guyer's Animal Micrology. Prerequisite: Courses 
1 and 2 or an equivalent. (9). 

Second semester; W., 2:00-5:00; S., 8:30-11:30. Assistant Pro- 
fessor Taylor, 47 W. 

25. Limnology. (2 Hrs.) Primarily for sophomores in the course 
in public health. A combination course offered by the departments 
of Botany and Zoology. 

First semester; hours to be arranged. Professor Chidester and 
others. 

26S. Advanced Limnology. (2 Hrs.) A continuation of Zoology 
25. The course consists mainly of field work. 

Summer session; hours to be arranged. Professor Chidester and 
others. 

31, 32, 33, (131, 132, 133). Comparative Anatomy, Histology and 
Embryology... (3-4 Hrs. per semester.) Advanced courses; to be taken 
ordinarily after most of the preceding courses have been completed. 
(15). 
First semester; M., F., 2:00-5:00. Professor Chidester, 47 W. 

40, (140). Current Literature. (1 Hr.) Open to seniors only. 
(19). 

First and second semesters; hours to be arranged. Professor 
Reese, 47 W. 

Graduate Courses. 

181, 182, 183, 184, 185. Comparative Anatomy, Histology and 
Embryology. (1-5 Hrs. per semester.) 

First and second semesters; hours to be arranged. (23). Pro- 
fessor Reese, Professor Chidester and Assistant Professor Taylor, 
47 W. 

190, 191, 192, 193, 194, 195. Research Work. (1-5 Hrs. per se- 
mester.) 

First and second semesters; hours to be arranged. (20). Pro- 
fessor Reese, Professor Chidester and Assistant Professor Taylor, 
47 W. 

NOTE : — For courses in entomology and genetics see announce- 
ment of courses offered in the College of Agriculture. 



1*74 West Virginia University 

COURSE IN PUBLIC HEALTH. 

The object of the four-year course in public health is to prepare 
men to take charge of municipal health laboratories, become executive 
secretaries of health units, and act as sanitarians and health officers. 

The curriculum includes fundamental courses in chemistry and 
biology, together with such engineering and medical subjects as pe- 
culiarly apply to sanitary science. Not the least important feature 
is the inclusion of practical field work under the direction of the State 
Department of Health. The degree of Bachelor of Science in Public 
Health will be conferred upon students who satisfactorily complete 
one hundred and forty-two hours of college work as set forth in the 
curriculum on the following page. Candidates for this degree will 
register in the College of Arts and Sciences with a member of the 
Department of Zoology as class officer. 

Graduates in this course are qualified to enter a school of medi- 
cine or to take up specialized graduate study. 



ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS. 

For admission to the course in Public Health, the candidate must 
have credit, obtained by examination or on certificates, for fifteen 
units of secondary school work, i. e., the work of a standard four- 
year high school. 

A. The following groups are required: 

(1) Four units of English. 

(2) Three units of Mathematics. 

(3) Two units of either French or German. 

(4) Two units in a fourth subject. 

(5) Four units elective. 

B. The Mathematics indicated in A must include one and one- 
half units of algebra, one unit of plane geometry and one- 
half unit of solid igeometry. 



C. Work in the subjects listed under (B) on page — of the 
University catalogue, not to exceed the number of units 
placed after each subject, will be accepted. 



The College of Arts and Sciences 



175 



UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM IN PUBLIC HEALTH 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Public Health. 



First Year, First Semester. 

Comp. & rhet. (Eng. 1) 3 

French or German 5 

Inorganic Chem. (Chem. 1) 4 
Advanced Algebra (Math. 3) 3 
Hygiene and Sanitation 1 1 

Military Science 1 17 



First Year, Second Semester. 

Comp. & rhet. (Eng. 2) 3 

French or German 5 

Inorganic Chem. (Chem. 2) 4 

Trigonometry (Math. 4) 2 
Mechanical Drawing (Dr. 23 

Eng'g.) 2 



Military Science 



1 17 



Summer — Field Practice 1 (State Department of Health) Credit 2. 



Second Year, First Semester. 

English Literature (Eng. 3) 2 
Qualitative Anaylsis (Chem. 



Second Year, Second Semester. 

English Literature (Eng. 4) 2 
Quantitative Analysis 

(Chem. 6) 4 

General Entomology (Ent. 1) 4 
Vertebrate Zoology (Zool. 2) 4 
Economic Zoology (Zool. 16) 2 
Military Science 1 17 



Summer — Field Practice 2 (State Department of Health) Credit 1. 
Limnology (Zool. 26) one hundred hours in the field and laboratory 1. 



5) 


4 


Mathematics 29 


3 


Animal Biology (Zool. 1) 


4 


Limnology (Zool. 25) 


2 


Elective 


1 


Military Science 


1 17 



Third Year, First Semester 

Medical Bacteriology 3 5 

Physics (1 and 3) ' 4 

Organic Chemistry (Chem. 

33) 5 

Epidemiology 1 2 

Insects and disease (Ent. 6) 1 17 Physical Chemistry (Chem 

• 63) 



Third Year, Second Semester. 

Parisitc.ogy (Bact. Med.) 3 
Physics (2 and 4) 4 

Physiology (Pharm.) 4 

General Geology (Geol. 2) 
Geol. Laboratory (Geol. 21) 1 



2 17 



Summer — Field Practice 3 (State Department of Health) together 
with Public Health Law and Administration. Credit 2 



Fourth Year, First Semester. 

Water Supply (Str. E. 159) 3 

Hygiene (Bact. 5) 2 
Water Ex. and Purif. 

(Ch. Eng. 187) 2 

Psychology 1 3 

Elem. of Sociology (Soc. 1) 3 
Market Milk (Dairv Hus. 

27) 2 

Elective 2 



17 



Fourth Year, Second Semester. 

Sanitary Eng'g. (Str. E. 160) 2 
St. and Mun. Lab. Meth. 

(Bact. 17) 2 

Biochemistry (Phys. Ch. 10) 5 
Principles of Biology (Zool. 

10) 3 

Principles of Ch. Welfare 

(Soc. 8) 2 

Municipal Government (Hist. 

40) 3 17 



The College of Engineering 
and Mechanic Arts 



THE FACULTY 

FRANK BUTLER TROTTER, A.M., L.L.D., President of the Uni- 
versity 

CLEMENT ROSS JONES, B.S.C.E., M.M.E., Dean and Professor of 
Power Engineering 

RUSSELL LOVE MORRIS, C.E., Professor of Railway and Highway 
Engineering 

ROLAND PARKER DAVIS, Ph.D., Professor of Structural and 
Hydraulic Engineering 

JOHN BEHNY GRUMBEIN, M.M.E., Professor of Steam and Ex- 
perimental Engineering 

ALEXANDER HARDIE FORMAN, M.M.E., Ph.D., Professor of 
Electrical Engineering 

ALFRED COPELAND CALLEN, E.M., M.S., 1 Professor of Mining 
Engineering and Director of Mining Extension 

LESLIE DAVID HAYES, B.S., M.E., Professor of Machine Design 
and Construction 

GEORGE PAUL BOOMSLITER, M.S., Professor of Mechanics 

JAMES HERBERT GILL, B.M.E., M.E., Professor of Machine Con- 
struction and Superintendent of Shops 

WILLARD WELLINGTON HODGE, M.A., Professor of Chemical 
Engineering 

EDWARD SILVER MACLIN, B.S.E., Professor of Industrial Edu- 
cation 

ARTHUR ADAMS HALL, B.S.M.E., Professor of Electrical Engi- 

neerina 
CHARLES ELMER LA WALL, E.M., M.S., Associate Professor of 

Mining Engineering, Director of Mining Extension 
GEORGE WALTER GROW, B.S.M.E., M.S., Assistant Professor of 

Drawing and Machine Design 
CAMDEN PAGE FORTNEY, B.S.C.E., Chief Engineer, State Road 

Commission, Director of School of Good Roads 
BENNETT SEXTON WHITE, B.S.M.E., Assistant Professor of 

Drawing and Machine Design 



l Resigned September 1, 1924. * 



178 West Virginia University 

CARL HENRY CATHER, M.S.M.E., Assistant Professor of 
Mechanics 

WALTER ALLOS KOEHLER, Ch.E., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 

Chemical Engineering 
THOMAS FRASER, E.M., Assistant Professor of Mining Engineering 
RUFUS ASA WEST, Instructor in Metalworking 
RAYMER EGBERT SEAMAN, Instructor in Woodworking and 

Foundry Practice 
HAROLD MALCOLM CATHER, M.S.M.E., Instructor in Drawing 

and Machine Design 
WILLIAM JOHN CARL, Instructor in Foundry Practice 
WILLIAM OLIVER GNAGEY, Instructor in Machine Shop Practice 
ROY EZEKIEL NELSON, B.S.C.E., Instructor in Surveying 
ALFRED BEVERLY SCOTT, Instructor in Mechanical Drawing 
LEWIS VAN CARPENTER, B.S.C.E., Instructor in Structural and 

Hydraulic Engineering 
LEE LEONARD AMIDON, B.S.M.E., Instructor in Steam and Ex- 
perimental Engineering 
TOM COX LLOYD, B.S.E.E., Instructor in Electrical Engineering 
HERMAN DELOSS STILLMAN, Assistant in Woodworking 
EVERLY CALVERT, Assistant in Machine Shop 
WAYNE ZEARLEY FRIEND, B.S.Ch.E, Research Fellow, Assistant 

in Chemical Engineering 
KENNETH DEAHL, Student Assistant in Surveying 
GEORGE ALVIN STEIN, Student Assistant in Chemical Engineering 
CHARLES MICHAEL RUNNER, Stationary Engineer 
LILLIAN KATHRYN HALL, Secretary 

ADAM CRAWFORD, Assistant Director of Mining Extension 
JOSEPH HUNTER HASKELL, Instructor in Mining Extension 
JULIAN PAUL MADDEN, Instructor in Mining Extension 
RAY HEWETT MAGEE, Instructor in Mining Extension 
RAYMOND JONES TITTERINGTON, Instructor in Mining Exten- 
sion 
EUGENE WILLIAM BELL, Instructor in Mining Extension 
THOMAS JOHN BINN§, Instructor in Mining Extension 
WINFREE LLOYD ARRINGTON, Instructor in Mining Extension 
JAMES STANLEY POUNDSTONE, Instructor in Mining Extension 
WALTER SCOTT MOORE, B.S.E.M., Local Instructor (Widen, W. 
Va.) in Mining Extension 



The College of Engineering 179 

FACULTY COMMITTEES 

Students' Courses and Hours: Dean JONES and Professors 
GRUMBEIN and FORMAN. 

Engineering Curricula: Dean JONES, Professors DAVIS, FOR- 
MAN, HAYES, HODGE, MACLIN and Associate Professor 
LAWALL. 

Engineering Society: Professors GRUMBEIN, MORRIS, FOR- 
MAN, BOOMSLITER, HAYES, HODGE and \ssociate Pro- 
fessor LAWALL. 

Library: Professors DAVIS and HAYES. 



ORGANIZATION 

The College of Engineering contains the following departments: 

Chemical engineering. 

Electrical engineering. 

Machine design and construction. 

Mechanics. 

Mining engineering. 

Railway and highway engineering and surveying. 

Steam, gas, and experimental engineering. 

Structural and hydraulic engineering. 

Industrial education. 

Short course in coal mining. 

School of good roads. 

Mining extension. 



180 West Virginia University 

BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 

All instruction in engineering subjects is centralized in Mechan- 
ical Hall. This building is located on the southeast corner of the 
campus and fronts on the athletic field. 

In this building are the offices, recitation and lecture rooms, 
general departmental drawing rooms, the shops, laboratories and 
museums of the College of Engineering; recitation, laboratory and 
model rooms for the department of geology; offices and drawing 
rooms for the Division Engineer and the Testing Engineer of the 
State Road Commission and offices for the State Geological Survey. 

In the drawing rooms are collections of models of structures, 
mechanisms, charts, state and government maps, surveys, photo- 
graphs, engineering specifications, drawings, tracings and blue prints. 
In connection with the drawing rooms there are blue printing and 
photographic rooms equipped with electric and sun printing appa- 
ratus, photostat and photographic outfit. 

The shops consist of a woodworking shop, forge shop, foundry, 
machine shop, sheet metal shop, pipe fitting shop, automobile repair 
shop and acetylene welding plant. Each workshop occupies a 
separate room and is independently equipped, with suitable benches, 
measuring instruments, tools, shop appliances and machines, such 
as are ordinarily installed in the larger engineering colleges and com- 
mercial shops. 

A variety of semi-automatic and full automatic machines provides 
unusual opportunity for the student of modern production methods. 

The power plant equipment consists of different types of steam 
and gas engines, direct connected or belted to electric generators; a 
100 K. W. Westinghouse condensing steam turbine direct-connected 
to a direct current generator; a 125 horse power Skinner Universal 
unaflow steam engine, direct connected to a 240 volt, three phase al- 
ternator; a 50 h. p. motor-generator set; a 150 B. H. P. steam boiler, 
equipped with a Green chain grate stoker and induced draft; an in- 
dependently fired superheater equipped with temperature controller; 
pumps, condensers, air compressors, steam traps and other auxiliary 
apparatus, providing the means for furnishing any desired kind of 
power. 

The engineering laboratories are supplied with standard gauges, 
measuring, calculating, and recording instruments; apparatus and 
appliances for qualitative and quantitative experimental work in civil, 
mechanical, steam, hydraulic, electrical, chemical, and mining engi- 
neering. 

The testing laboratory is equipped with apparatus and machines 
for testing cement, iron, steel, brick, stone, and other materials of 
engineering. The principal machines and apparatus are an Olsen 



The College of Engineering 181 

testing machine of 400,000 pounds capacity, taking tension and com- 
pression specimens up to six feet, and beams up to sixteen feet in 
length; a 50,000 pound Riehle testing machine; a 20,000 pound Riehle 
automatic and autographic testing machine; a 10,000 pound' Olsen 
transverse testing machine; a 60,000 inch-pound Riehle-Miller torsion 
machine; one Olsen and two Fairbanks cement testers; Brinnell and 
Shore hardness testers; a standard abrasion cylinder; a stone saw; 
besides smaller apparatus for testing cement, lubricating oils, and 
extension and deflection of materials. 

The mechanical and steam laboratories contain small steam and 
gas engines, a compound air compressor with electrical and mechani- 
cal control, Westinghouse air brake apparatus, dynamometers, fric- 
tion brakes, condensers, injectors and ejectors, steam and gas engine 
indicators, revolution counters, plani-meters, anemometers and ap- 
paratus for testing pressure gauges, indicator springs, thermometers, 
Venturi meters and nozzles for measuring flow of air and steam, etc. 
These are supplemented by the power plant equipment previously de- 
scribed, which affords facilities for steam and gas engine trials and 
boiler tests with larger units, and also provides facilities for various 
lines of experimental investigation. 

In addition to the larger generating and control units in the power 
plant, the electrical laboratory is provided with a number of com- 
pound, shunt and series wound direct current generators and motors, 
ranging from fractional-horsepower motors to 20-kilowatt generators, 
single and poly-phase alternating current generators and motors of 
frequencies from 20 to 133 cycles and capacities ranging from frac- 
tional-horsepower motors to 20-kilowatt generators; rotary-converter 
and motor generator sets; rectifiers, storage batteries, speed regulat- 
ing and controlling apparatus; reactances, auto, constant voltage and 
constant current transformers, Tesla transformers and other experi- 
mental apparatus for demonstrating many of the principles of elec- 
tricity; instruments and accessories such as tachometers, slip meters, 
frequency meters, etc.; a G. E. oscillograph; telephone equipment in- 
cluding two magneto P. B. exchanges and a circuit model of the com- 
mon battery exchange; a Macbeth illuminometer; laboratory precision 
standards for calibration of D. C. and A. C. instruments; electric rail- 
way equipment consisting of a truck, motors, air brake equipment, 
three types of control equipment and a switchboard panel with indi- 
cating and recording instruments. 

The hydraulic laboratory equipment consists of a compound 
duplex steam pump supplying water to a closed steel pressure tank, 
from which run headers arranged for insertion of orifices, nozzles, 
and pipes supplying the various hydraulic motors; concrete storage 
tanks, measuring tanks and weighing scales; cascade water wheel; 



182 West Virginia University 

Venturi meter, water meter steel weir-box weir-gauges, and other 
minor measuring and controlling apparatus. 

The road material testing laboratory equipment consists of stand- 
ard abrasion cylinder for testing paving brick; a standard three- 
gang motor driven Deval abrasion cylinder; motor driven ball mill; 
briquette machine; core drill; motor driven grinding lap and stone 
saw; motor driven "Dorry" hardness testing machine; standard Page 
impact tester, with anvil for cementation tests; road-making tools. 
Braun planetary pulverizer; Dulin roterex; motor driven sieve shaker, 
etc. 

The mining laboratory is equipped with drills, coal cutting ma- 
chinery, air receiver, etc.; leading types of mining rescue apparatus, 
pulmotor, smoke chamber for use in training with rescue apparatus, 
devices for demonstrating the explosibility of coal dust, the William 
Clifford-James T. Beard collection of safety lamps, device for showing 
the length of cap with varying percentages of methane in mine air, 
models showing methods of working anthracite and bituminous seams 
of coal, small mine fan for experimental use in the study of mine 
ventilation, recording barometer, hydrometer, etc. Additional equip- 
ment has been installed to permit washing and concentrating tests 
of coal, pyrite, etc. A 7^x10% Blake crusher discharges into the 
boot of a Jeffrey bucket elevator. The material may be sent from 
the elevator to either a 30-inch trommel or a 24-inch shaking screen; 
these screens have 1 1, %, V2 and ^-inch round holes, and the screened 
products are discharged into bins. A pair of 8x5 inch Sturtevant 
rolls can be used for fine crushing. A two-compartment Harz jig and 
a Richards pulsator jig comprise the present jigging equipment, while 
a Butchart table is provided for the treatment of material too fine for 
the jigs. A small Jeffrey-Robinson coal washer can be used for 
demonstration and testing work, and its perf ormance^ or the perform- 
ance of the jigs and tables, can be checked up by sink-and-float test 
machines. A bench has been equipped with crushers and grinders so 
that the samples from the laboratory may be prepared at once for 
chemical analysis. 

The metallurgical laboratory is especially equipped for the study 
of fuels, such as coal, coke, gas and oil. In part it comprises analy- 
tical balances, Gary combination gas furnace, electric drying oven, 
water still, Emerson and Parr fuel calorimeters, apparatus for the 
analysis of gases, apparatus for the proximate analysis of coal and 
for determining the coking properties, etc. 

The oil and gas laboratory is provided with equipment for de- 
termining the physical and chemical properties of oils and gases, as 
follows : Junker calorimeter, Emerson calorimeter, Saybolt standard 
Universal viscosometer, Pesky-Martin flash point apparatus, calo- 
rimeter, apparatus for heat test, fire test, cold test and emulsion test; 



The College of Engineering 183 

Baume hydrometers; apparatus for the determination of carbon resi- 
due in oils; the estimation of gasoline content per 1000 cubic feet of 
natural gas, etc., etc. 

Transits, levels, compasses, etc., are provided for the use of stu- 
dents in land and mine surveying and in highway and railway con- 
struction. 

The laboratories for chemical engineering and industrial chem- 
istry are well equipped for small scale production of certain com- 
mercial chemicals and analysis and testing of industrial and engi- 
neering materials. Special apparatus and machinery for oil refining, 
by-product tests, water purification, ceramic and metallurgical work 
includes: Lummus column (16 chambers) still; furnace and absorp- 
tion chain for determining the by-product value of coal (U. S. Steel 
Corp. method); Permutit water softener; Keramic Kiln, electric and 
gas furnaces; metallurgical microscopes and a complete Bausch and 
Lomb micrometallographic outfit; Sperry Filter Press with monteju 
and steam pump; wood and lead tanks, centrifuge, vacuum oven, 
Hyvac and Lammert Rotary pump, autoclave, and sulphonator. A 
large number of manufacturers' displays add to the facilities for in- 
struction. 

The latest trade literature, catalogues, and reports of commercial 
developments in engineering are kept in classified files for students' 
reference. The University library has a thoroughly classified and 
indexed collection of the standard and latest books in engineering 
and the allied sciences, complete bound sets of the transactions of 
several scientific and engineering societies, and current issues and 
bound volumes of the principal scientific and technical periodicals. 

The extensive technical library recently donated by Mrs. F. L. 
Emory as a nucleus for a memorial to her husband, Professor Fred- 
erick Lincoln Emory, deceased, is also available for use. 

FACILITIES FOR PRACTICAL OBSERVATION INSPECTION 

TRIPS. 

The University is located in a region which affords the student 
unusual opportunities for practical observation and education in en- 
gineering. Morgantown is practically in the center of an extensive 
coal region in which are large workings of the Pittsburgh, Sewickly 
and upper Freeport seams while nearby are the Fairmont and Con- 
neilsville fields. West Virginia's gas and oil district approaches 
within four miles of the city. The region abounds with rich deposits 
of glass sand, limestone, clays, shales and valuable building stone. 

Within the city limits or in nearby towns are numerous factories 
and plants, including large central stations for the production of elec- 
tric power, cement plant, tin plate mills, extensive glass factories 



184 West Virginia ^University 

manufacturing glass of every description, brick plants, by-product 
coking plant, brass plant, brass and iron foundries, large oil and gas 
pumping stations, glass sand and limestone crushing plants, etc. 
Connellsville is only 45 miles from Morgantown and Pittsburgh, the 
center of the world's greatest iron and steel industries, is only 103 
miles distant. 

Organized inspection trips under faculty supervision are taken 
each year. Credit for one inspection trip is required for graduation. 

ENGINEERING SOCIETY. 

The Engineering Society is conducted by the students of the Col- 
lege of Engineering under the direction of a faculty committee. Stu- 
dents taking any of the four-year curricula leading to the bacca- 
laureate degrees in engineering are required to engage actively in 
the work of" the society during the third and fourth years. A credit 
of one hour will be given for the work of each of the last two years. 

AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CIVIL ENGINEERS. 

The Student chapter of the American Society of Civil Engineers 
holds weekly meetings during the school year. Alternate meetings 
are devoted to papers prepared by members of the chapter and lec- 
tures by members of the faculty and outside engineers. 

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS. 

The West Virginia University Student Branch of the American 
Institute of Electrical Engineers holds weekly meetings during the 
college year. 

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF MINING AND METALLURGICAL 

ENGINEERS. 

An affiliated student society of the American Institute of Mining 
and Metallurgical Engineers is maintained in the College of Engineer- 
ing. Meetings are held every week. 

AMERICAN SOCIETY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERS. 

The student branch of the American Society of Mechanical En- 
gineers holds meetings every week during the college year. 

TAU BETA PI. 

The West Virginia Alpha Chapter of Tau Beta Pi was installed 
in the College of Engineering on June 3, 1922. Tau 'Beta Pi is the 
honorary engineering fraternity and has chapters in more than forty 



The College of Engineering 185 

of the leading engineering colleges. Membership may be conferred 
upon candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Chemical, 
Civil, Electrical, Mechanical or Mining engineering who have main- 
tained a rank in scholarship in the highest quarter of their class. 

TUITION, FEES AND INSTRUMENTS. 

All engineering students must pay the following fees at the open- 
ing of each semester: contingent fee, $15.00; medical fee, $2.50; 
student activity fee, $5.00; registration fee, $2.00. The registration 
fee is remitted to all students who complete the registration during 
the first three days of the first semester and the first two days of the 
second semester. 

Tuition is free to residents of West Virginia, but for students not 
residents of West Virginia the tuition fee is $50.00 a semester. 

A diploma fee of $10.00 must be paid by all students at the begin- 
ning of the semester in which they expect to receive their degree. 

All students must furnish their own drawing instruments. Stu- 
dents who prefer may purchase all instruments needed at the Uni- 
versity at a cost much below the retail prices. The present cost of in- 
struments of the grade desired is approximately $25.00. Instruments 
suitable for temporary use only can be furnished at a cost of about 
$15.00. 



186 



West Virginia University 



ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS. 

For admission to the College of Engineering, the candidate must 
have credit, obtained by examination or on certificate, for fifteen units 
of secondary school work, i. e., the work of a standard four-year high 
school. 

A. The following groups are required: 

(1) Four units of English. 4 

(2) Three units in one other subject. 

(3) Two units in a third 1 subject. 

(4) Two units in a fourth subject. 

(5) Four units elective. 

B. In addition to the four units of English the work indicated in 
(A) must include: one and one-half units of algebra, one unit 
of plane geometry and one-half unit of solid geometry 1 . 

C. Work in the following subjects not to exceed the number of 
units placed after each subject will be accepted: 

English 4 4 units Science 3 







Physics 1 unit 


Foreign Languages 2 




Chemistry 1 unit 


Latin 


4 units 


Biology 1 unit 


Greek 


3 units 


Botany 1 unit 


French 


3 units 


Geology 1 unit 


German 


3 units 


Zoology 1 unit 


Spanish 


2 units 


General Science 1 unit 


Italian 


2 units 


Physical geography ' x k unit 
Physiology V2 unit 


Mathematics 




Hygiene and sanitation Y2 unit 


Algebra 


2 units 




Plane Geometry 


1 unit 


Vocational subjects (not to exceed 


Solid Geometry 


V2 unit 


four units in all). 


Trignometry 


V2 unit 


Agriculture 3 units 
Household arts 3 units 


History and economics 




Manual training 3 units 


History 


3 units 


Bookkeeping or book- 


Civics 


1 unit 


keeping and commer- 


Elementary economics 


1 unit 


cial arithmetic 2 units 


Sociology 


1 unit 


Shorthand and type- 
writing 2 units 


Education 


2 units 


Commercial geography Vk unit 
Commercial law V2 unit 



Drawing 

Free-hand (drawing 1 unit (Music: — violin organ or 

Mechanical drawing 1 unit piano 

lStudents are advised to present at least two units in one foreign language, one 
unit in history and one unit in physics. Students offering less than one and one-half 
units in algebra must make up the shortage before entering the class in college 
algebra. Solid geometry, when not offered, must be made up before the beginning 
of the second year. 

2Not less than two units of one foreign languge will be accepted for entrance 
but one unit of a second forelign language will be accepted provided, two units 
have been offered in another foreign language. 

3A group of two or three units in science may h=> made by combinting one unit 
each of any of the following : physics, chemistry, biology, botany, zoology and 
geology. 

4A student entering with only three units in English must take six hou^ of 
College English in addition to that required for a degree. This requirement will ba 
waived for students who present two units in a foreign language. 



The College of Engineering 187 

ADMISSION WITH ADVANCED STANDING. 

Students from other institutions will be given credit for work 
already done in accordance with the general rules for advanced stand- 
ing, but at least one year of resident work will be required for any 
of the baccalaureate degrees in engineering. 

ADMISSION AS SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Students over twenty-one years of age desiring to take special 
work in the College of Engineering and Mechanic Arts are required 
to present nine units for entrance and to conform to the general regu- 
lations of the University regarding special students. (See University 
Catalogue.) 

Such students must give satisfactory evidence that they are pre- 
pared to take the desired studies advantageously; but if they subse- 
quently desire to become candidates for a degree or to take a regular 
curriculum in engineering, they must pass the required entrance ex- 
amination for that year. Special provisions are made for those tak- 
ing strictly vocational courses. 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS. 

To be classified as a freshman in the College of Engineering a 
student must have credit for at least 15 units of entrance require- 
ments; to be classified as a regular freshman he must have fulfilled all 
entrance requirements. To be classified as a sophomore he must 
have credit for twenty-eight hours of college work; as a junior, sixty - 
eight hours; as a senior, one hundred and eight hours. 

CREDIT FOR WORK DONE IN ABSENCE. 

Students of the College of Engineering under exceptional circum- 
stances are permitted to apply for advanced standing for no: more 
than a total of six hours credit for practical work in the following 
subjects done in the field, shops, or drafting room, during vacation or 
other periods of absence from the University: woodworking (3), 
pattern making (1 and 4), foundry practice (5), forging (7), shop 
work (9), pipe fitting (10), machine tool work (13 and 14), machine 
construction (15), electrical construction (610), mechanical drawing 
(20, 22, 24 and 25), surveying (109 and 110). 

To obtain credit application must be made before the work is 
begun, and a daily record kept of the work done. A certified state- 
ment of work done signed by the employer accompanied by a full 
report prepared by the applicant, must be filed with the Dean of the 
College on or before October 1st. Rules of procedure and application 
blanks may be obtained from the Dean. 

In order to obtain credit for Summer Practice 164, 210 and 211, 
the same rules of procedure apply. 



188 West Virginia University 

UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULA. 

1. A four-year curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Civil Engineering, with option in sanitary engineering. 

2. A four-year eurrculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
'Science in Mechanical Engineering. 

3. A four-year curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Electrical Engineering. 

4. A four-year curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Engineering of Mines, with options in coal mining and oil 
and gas engineering. 

5. A four- year curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Chemical Engineering. 

6. A four-year curriculum in industrial education leading to the 
degree of Bachelor of Science. 

7. Combined science and engineering curricula extending over 
five or more years leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science, and 
Bachelor of Science in Engineering. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREE. 

To receive any of the baccalaureate degrees conferred in the Col- 
lege of Engineering the student must have .satisfied all the entrance 
requirements and, except in the case of Curriculum No. 1, must have 
received credit for one hundred and forty-eight semester hours, in- 
cluding a summer term equivalent to five semester hours, three pi 
which shall be in residence and two hours in outside practice. The 
particular curriculum and distribution of work as prescribed for each 
degree isi stated below. 

No student is permitted to register for fewer than fourteen or 
more than twenty hours of work in any one semester. 

SPECIAL CURRICULA FOR STUDENTS WITH IRREGULAR 
PREPARATION. 

The courses of study outlined on the following pages are intended 
for students who matriculate with full entrance requirements. Alter- 
native curricula have been arranged for students who offer only one 
unit in algebra for entrance or who are otherwise not prepared to 
take college algebra and trigonometry, (Mathematics 3 and 4). Such 
students will take review algebra (Mathematics 3, 4 and 6 in the fresh- 
man year and Mathematics 5 in the: first six weeks of the summer 
school between the first and second years. A student finding it im- 
possible to remain for the summer term will take Analytical Geometry 
5 and Calculus 7 in the sophomore year and will have another oppor- 
tunity of becoming regular by taking Calculus 8 and Mechanics 70 in 
the summer school between the second and third years. Similar pro- 
visions are made for deficiencies in English and solid geometry. 



The College of Engineering 189 

SUBSTITUTIONS. 

The following substitutions are regularly allowed in addition to 
special substitutions listed elsewhere: Pattern making 1 and Forging 
7 or Pattern making 1 and Machine Work 10 for Shop Work 9; Em- 
pirical Design 24 for Mechanical Drawing 25; Chemistry 5 or 6 (2 to 
5 hours) for Chemistry 3; Chemistry 3 for 2 hours of Chemistry 5 or 
6; Economics 1 and 2 for Economics 3; Economics 11 or 11 S for 
Economics 10. 

THESIS. 

Any candidate for baccalaureate degrees in engineering may with 
the consent of 'his major professor prepare a thesis on some subject 
relating to a special branch of engineering or other department of 
applied science. It must be fully elaborated and accompanied by 
the necessary working drawing or models required for the proper 
elucidation of the subject of the thesis. With its accompanying draw- 
ings it will be presented for approval, first to the instructor under 
whose guidance it has been prepared, then to the head of the depart- 
ment in which the degree is to be conferred. A typewritten copy of 
the thesis, prepared according to official specifications for thesis and 
signed by the instructor in charge and the head of the department, 
must be placed in the University library before graduation. A small 
fee is charged for binding. 



190 West Virginia University 

CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

The course in civil engineering has been planned so that the 
student will get a substantial foundation for the work of the civil 
engineer. Emphasis is placed on the subjects underlying the science 
of engineering, such as physics, mathematics, etc., and these subjects 
are presented to the engineering students, not as an end in them- 
selves, but as a means for the solution of engineering problems. The 
professional subjects are taught by means of recitations, lectures, 
drawing room work, laboratory work and field work. 

Civil engineering includes topographical and geodetic engineer- 
ing, which has to do with measurements of land surfaces; railroad 
and highway engineering, comprising the construction and mainte- 
nance of railroad lines and highways and the economic features 
govering them; municipal engineering, comprising the construction 
of sewers, water-works, etc., structural engineering, comprising the 
construction of buildings, bridges, foundations, docks, walls, piers and 
other fixed structures; and hydraulic engineering comprising the de- 
velopment of water power, the transference of water from place to 
place, etc. The field is so broad that no man can ever become an 
expert over its whole extent, but fortunately all of these various 
branches rest upon a very small body of principles, and the student 
is not forced to specialize until he enters active practice. 

In addition to the Sanitary Option, outlined below, the student 
is offered the choice of two options in the second semester of the 
senior year, one of which devotes more time to the subject of rail- 
road and highway engineering, the other to the subject of hydraulic 
engineering. 

OPTIONAL COURSE IN SANITARY ENGINEERING. 

Students in Civil Engineering who desire to specialize in Sanitary 
Engineering are permitted to substitute any or all of the following: 
Chemistry 6 or 15. Quantitative Analysis (3 to 5 Hrs.); Organic 
Chemistry 33 (5 Hrs.) ; The Chemistry of Colloids 62 (2 Hrs.) ; Gener- 
al Bacteriology 41 (3 Hrs.) ; other approved courses in chemistry and 
bacteriology not to exceed six hours; Water Examination and Puri- 
fication 187 (2 Hrs.); for an equal amount of credit in other required 
subjects but the subjects must be approved by the faculty. 

NOTE: iSee page 13, special curricula for students with irregu- 
lar preparation. 



The College of Engineering 



191 



UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM IN CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering. 



First Year — First Semester. 



First Year — Second Semester. 



17 



Rhetoric and comp. (Eng. 1) 3 
Algebra and- trigonometry 

(Math. 3 and 4) 5 

Inorganic chemistry (Chem. 1) 4 
Military science (1) 1 

Mechanical drawing 20 2 

Shop work 9 2 

Engineering Lectures 

Second Year — First Semester. 
Descriptive geometry 26 3 

Advanced surveying 102 2 

General physics (Phys. 5, 3, 2) 5 
Differential calculus 

(Math. 7) 3 

Military science (3) 1 

Quantitative analysis (Chem.3) 2 
Mechanical drawing 25 2 18 



Rhetoric and comp. (Eng. 2) 3 
Trigonometry and analytical 

geometry (Math. 5 and 6) 5 

Land surveying 100 3 

Inorganic chemistry (Ohem.2) 4 

Military science (2) 1 

Mechanical drawing 22 2 



18 



Second Year — Second Semester. 

Integral calculus (Math. 8) 3 
General physics (Phys. 6, 4) 5 
Topographical surveying 103 2 
Statics 70 3 

Military science (4) 1 

General geology (Geol. 2) 3 
Laboratory geology (Geol. 21) 1 18 



Summer work, Surveying 109 — 1. 

Summer work (out of residence), Summer practice 164 — 2, 



Third Year — First Semester. 



Third Year — Second Semester. 



Mechanics of materials 71 4 

Mechanical laboratory 130 2 

Railway location 104 3 

Heat engineering 120 3 

Economics geology (Geol. 11) 3 

Economics (Econ. 3) 3 
Engineering society 162 18 



Kinetics 72 
Hydraulics 73 
Mechanical laboratory 131 
Roofs and bridges 141 
Applied electricity 51 
Money, banking and credit 

(Economics 10) 
Engineering Society 162 



Summer work, Railroad surveying 110 — 2. 



18 



Fourth Year — First Semester. Fourth Year — Second Semester. 



Railway maintenance 105 3 

Water supply engineering 149 3 
Materials of construction 156 2 
Bridge design 142 4 

Roads and pavements 106 3 
Business law 161 3 

Engineering society 163 18 



Thesis 113 or 152 
Highway economics 108 



Masonry and foundation 146 3 

Sanitary engineering 148 2 

Concrete construction 147 3 

Advanced structures 143 3 

Cost accounting (Bus.Adm. 4) 2 

English (Eng. 86) 1 

Engineering Society 163 1 
Inspection Trip 

Options from the list below 3 

Railroad economy 107 3 

Water power engineering 150 3 



18 



1^2 West Virginia University 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

The aim of the course in mechanical engineering is to give the 
student such mental equipment as will enable him to> deal most effec- 
tively both technically and commercially with general engineering 
problems. All possible practice isi given in the work that an engineer 
is ordinarily called on to do, but greater stress is laid on a thorough 
knowledge of those underlying principles and methods which are the 
foundation of all engineering professions. To this is added a study 
of those economic subjects which are essential to a thorough under- 
standing of sound business methods. Options are provided in the 
fourth year which enable the student to specialize in accordance with 
his natural inclination. 

• The work in pure mathematics is terminated at the end of the 
second year, and applications follow in the recitation room courses in 
mechanism, statics, mechanics of materials, dynamics, and machine 
design. iSteam engineering begins with the course in thermodynamics 
in the third year and is continued by the courses in heat engines and 
power plant design with options in the design of steam engines and 
turbines. A sufficient amount of electrical engineering is given in the 
third and fourth years to enable the student to handle engineering 
operations involving the simpler electrical problem®. 

Drafting room work is given throughout the four years, starting 
with elementary mechanical drawing in the first year. The courses 
in mechanism, machine design and power plant design are accom- 
panied by drawing room work, giving practical applications of the 
principles studied in the class room, and constant practice in the 
executon of drawings. 

The engineering laboratories provide the students with practice 
in testing, handling and caring for a large variety of machinery, 
including steam, air, gas, hydraulic, material-testing and power-trans- 
mission machinery. One-half day a week is devoted to this work 
during the last two years. 

The shop work, commencing in the first year, is planned to ac- 
quaint students with the fundamental tool's and mechanical operations, 
to enable them to acquire a reasonable amount of manual dexterity, 
and to furnish them continuously with practical examples of the 
principles studied in their class rooms. A study is made of the meth- 
ods used in manufacturing plants and engineering establishments, 
and of the principles of industrial management. 

The thorough uderstanding of principles, the development of the 
reasoning faculty, and the knowledge of the sources to draw on for 
engineering information as it may be needed, are of the greatest im- 
portance, and take precedence over the mere acquisition of knowledge. 

NOTE: See page 13, Special curricula for students with irregu- 
lar preparation. 



The College of Engineering 



193 



UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM IN MECHANICAL 

ENGINEERING. 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Mechanical 

Engineering. 



First Year — First Semester. 

Rhetoric and comp. (Eng. 1) 3 
Algebra and trigonometry 

(Math. 3 and 4) 5 

Inorganic chemistry(Chem.l) 4 
Military sciencec (1) 1 

Mechanical drawing 20 2 

Pattern making 1 and 
Forging 7, or 

Foundry 5 2 

Engineering lectures 



First Year — Second Semester. 



Rhetoric and comp. (Eng. 2) 
Trigonometry and analytical 
geometry (Math 5 and 6) 
Surveying 101 

Inorganic chemistry(Chem.2) 
Military science (2) 
Mechanical drawing 22 
Foundry 5, or 
17 Pattern making 1 and 
Forging 7 



2 18 



Summer work, Machine shop 13 — 3. 



Second Year — First Semester. 

Differential calculus (Math. 7) 3 
General physics (Phys. 5, 3) 5 



Descriptive geometry 26 
Military science (3) 
Quant, analysis (Chem. 3) 
Empirical design 24 
Pattern making 4, or 
Machine work 14 and 
Pipe fitting 10 



2 18 



Second Year — Second Semester. 

Integral calculus (Math. 8) 3 

General physics (Phys. 6, 4) 5 

Statics 70 3 

Mechanism 29 4 

Military science (4) 1 
Machine work 14 and 
Pipe -fit ting 10, or 

Pattern making 4 2 18 



Summer work (out of residence), Summer practice 164 — 2. 
Third Year — First Semester. Third Year — Second Semester. 



Mechanics of materials 71 4 

Thermodynamics 121 3 
Elect, and mag. (Physics 23) 3 

Economics (Econ. 3) 3 

Mechanical laboratory 130 2 

Machine construction 15 2 
Engineering society 162 17 



Kinetics 72 3 

Hydraulics 73 2 

Heat engines 122 3 
Money, banking and credits 

(Econ. 10) 2 

Machine design 35 2 

Mechanical laboratory 131 2 

Shop methods 16 2 

Machine drawing 36 2 

Engineering society 162 1 19 



Fourth Year — First Semester. Fourth Year — Second Semester. 



Power plant design 123 3 

Engineering laboratory 132 2 

Electrical engineering 53 4 

Business law 161 3 

Machine design 37 2 

Machine drawing 38 2 

Structural engineering 144 2 
Engineering society 163 18 



Cost accounting (Bus.Adm. 4) 2 

Engineering laboratory 133 2 

Elements of elect. eng y g. 54 2 

English (Eng. 86) 1 

Designing and drawing 41 2 

Engineering society 163 1 
Inspection trip 

Options from the list below 6 18 



Steam engine design 39 2 

Gas engineering 126 3 

Steam turbines 125 3 

Steam engine drawing 40 2 



Industrial engineering 47 3 

Gas engine design 45 3 

Heating and ventilation 127 3 

Steam boilers 124 2 

Thesis 49 or 135 3 



124 West Virginia University 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 

The course in electrical engineering' is intended to give the stu- 
dent that theoretical and practical instruction which will enable hm 
to obtain a basic knowledge of the application of electricity. 

The work of the first two years is largely preparatory to the 
technical training of the latter two years, and parallels close that of 
the mechanical engineering course. This gives the requisite founda- 
tion in English, mathematics, physics, chemistry, drafting and the 
elements of shop practice. Electrical construction is taken up at an 
early part of the course so that the student may profit by it when 
seeking summer employment. Some of the fundamental principles of 
electricity and magnetism are studied in the course in physics. 

The purely electrical engineering courses begin with the third 
year. In the first semester of this year, the elements of electrical 
engineering together with illumination and signalling are studied. 
The theory is studied in the classroom and then experimentally proved 
or verified in the laboratory. In the second semester this study is 
continued to include the design, construction and operation of direct 
current machinery as well as the theory of alternating currents. In 
addition to the electrical studies the following supplementary subjects 
come throughout the year: thermodynamics and heat engines; me- 
chanics, mechanical laboratory practice; economics; and money, credit 
and banking. 

The fourth year is largely devoted to a study of the commercial 
applications of electricity either directly or indirectly. The design 
construction and operation of alternating current apparatus are 
studied in the class and the laboratory. The generation of electrical 
energy, its distribution and utiliaztion, together with the economic 
factors to be considered are covered by the course in electrical gene- 
ration and distribution, which is continued into the second semester 
as a design course. Previous to this second semester's work in gen- 
eral design, the fundamentals of design are covered in the courses 
in electrical design and calculations and machine design, both of which 
are given in the first semester. The course in electric traction takes 
up the proper selection of electric railway equipment and the course 
in advanced electrical laboratory is included to give the student an 
opportunity for original work. In the option the student has a choice 
of the following subjects: industrial applications of electricity; tele- 
phone engineering; transients, surges and electric waves; high tension 
dielectric phenomena; thesis; differential equations; and radio teleg- 
raphy. Other courses not already mentioned in the fourth year are: 
business law; engineering society; hydraulics; engineering laboratory; 
English; and cost accounting. 

NOTE: 'See page 13, Special curricula for students with irregu- 
lar preparation. 



The College of Engineering 



195 



UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM IN ELECTRICAL 

ENGINEERING. 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Electrical 

Engineering. 



First Year — First Semester. 

Rhetoric and comp. (Eng. 1) 3 
Algebra and trigonometry 

(Math. 3 and 4) 5 

Inorganic chemistry (Chem.l) 4 
Military science (1) 1 

Mechanical drawing 20 2 

Forging 7 1 

Pattern making 1 1 

Engineering lectures 

Summer work, 



First Year — Second Semester. 

Rhetoric and comp. (Eng. 2) 3 
Trigonometry and analytical 
geometry (Math. 5 and 6) 
Surveying 101 

Inorganic chemistry (Chem. 2) 
Military science (2) 
Mechanical drawing 22 
Electrical construction 610 



18 



17 

Machine shop 13 — 3. 



Second Year — First Semester. Second Year — Second Semester. 



Differential calculus (Math.7) 



General physics (Phys. 5 
Descriptive geometry 26 
Military science (3) 
Quant, analysis (Chem, 

3) 
Epirical design 24 
Foundry 5 



3) 



Integral calculus (Math. 8) 
General physics (Phys. 6, 4) 
Statics 70 
Mechanism 29 
Military science (4) 
Pattern making 4 



18 



18 



Summer work (out of residence), Summer practice 164 — 2 



Third Year — First Semester 

Mechanics of materials 71 4 

Thermodynamics 121 3 

Elements of elect, eng'g 50 4 

Hydraulics 73 2 

Mechanical laboratory 130 2 

Economics (Econ. 3) 3 
Engineering society 162 



18 



Third Year — Second Semester. 

Kinetics 72 3 

Heat engines 122 3 

Direct current machinery 52 4 

A. C. Theory and meas. 55. 3 

Mechanical laboratory 131 2 
Money, banking and credits 

(Econ. 10) 2 

Engineering society 162 1 18 



Fourth Year — First Semester. 

A. C. machinery 56 3 

Machine design 35 2 

Machine drawing 36 2 

Electrical laboratory 560 2 

Elec. gen. and dist. 63 3 

Elec. design and calc. 590 3 

Business law 161 3 
Engineering society 163 18 



Indust. applications of elec 65 3 
Telephone engineering 68 3 

Transients, surges and elec- 
tric waves 62 3 
High tension dielectric phe- 
nomenon 67 3 



Fourth Year — Second Semester. 

Illumination and signalling 58 2 
Electric traction 57 2 

Elec. gen. and dist. 630 3 

English (English 86) 1 

Engineering laboratory 133 2 
Advance elect, laboratory 600 2 
Cost accounting (Bus.Adm.4) 2 
Engineering society 163 1 

Inspection trip 
Options from the list below 3 18 



Thesis 69 3 
Differential equations 

(Math. 9) 3 

Radio-telegraphy (Phys. 11) 3 



196 West Virginia University 

MINING ENGINEERING. 

. Mining engineering deals with the process and appliances used 
in the extraction of minerals from within the earth. Not only must 
the mining engineer be thoroughly trained in mining and geology, but 
also in the application of the fundamental principles of civil, electrical 
and mechanical engineering to mining conditions. 

The first two years of the course in mining engineering are de- 
voted to a thorough .training in the underlying principles of mathe- 
matics, physics and ehemestry. Supplementing these are courses in 
surveying, including mine surveying, English, drawing, and shop work. 
For the last two years of the course two options are provided, one in 
coal mining and one in geological engineering and oil and gas pro- 
duction. The student is permitted to state his choice of option at 
the beginning of the sophomore year. 

GOAL MINING. 

In the coal mining option the study of coal mining is taken up 
in the third year. This study includes the geology and classification 
of -coals; explosives and blasting; prospecting; shaft sinking and tun- 
neling; methods of working; haulage, hoisting and pumping; and the 
preparation of coal for the market. A course in the projection of 
mine workings and the design of mining plants runs throughout the 
senior year. A thorough course in mine gases and the ventilation 
of mines is given in the first half of the fourth year, supplemented 
by work in the mining laboratory. The course in fuels is designed to 
give the student a knowledge of the various fuels that are utilized in 
engineering practice, while the courses in metallurgy acquaint him 
with the minerals and processes used in manufacture of iron and 
steel. The course in mine management presents the economic, social 
and financial considerations to be met in the successful management 
of a mining enterprise. 

The study of steam engineering begins with the course in heat 
engineering, and practice in the handling and care of instruments and 
machinery and in the solution of practical engineering problems is 
offered in the mechanical laboratory. These courses are followed by 
courses in electrical engineering and structural engineering. 

A training in the science of geology is offered by the courses in 
mineralogy and general geology. These courses may be supple- 
mented by the study of the economic geology of the non-metallic 
minerals in the senior year, special attention being paid to the geolo- 
gy of coal, oil and gas. iShould the student desire further work in 
geology a course in field geology is offered as an elective subject. 

The courses in economics, money, banking and credits, business 
law and cost accounting furnish the fundamental business training so 
essential for the engineer. 

NOTE: iSee page 13, Special curricula for students with irregu- 
lar preparation. 



The College of Engineering 



197 



UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM IN MINING ENGINEERING 

(COAL MINING OPTION) 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Engineering of 

Mines. 



First Year — First Semester. 

Rhetoric and comp. (Eng. 1) 3 
Algebra and trigonometry 

(Math. 3 and 4) 5 

Inorganic chemistry (Chem.l) 4 

Military science (1) 1 

Mechanical drawing 20 2 

Shop work 9 2 
Engineering lectures 



17 



First Year — Second Semester. 

Rhetoric and comp. (Eng. 2) 3 
Trigonometry and analytical 

geometry (Math. 5 and 6) 5 

Land surveying 100 3 

Inorganic chemistry(Chem.2) 4 

Military science (2) 1 

Mechanical drawing 22 2 



IS 



Second Year — First Semester. Second Year — Second Semester. 



Differential calculus (Math.7) 3 

General physics (Phys. 5, 3) 5 

Descriptive geometry 26 3 

Advanced surveying 102 2 

Military science (3) 1 

Mineralogy 89 1 

Pipe-fitting 10 1 

Mechanical drawing 25 2 18 



Integral calculus (Math. 8) 
General physics (Phys. 6, 4) 
Statics 70 
Mine surveying 80 
Military science (4) 
Quan. analysis (Chem. 6) 



18 



Summer work, Mine surveying 90 — 3. 



Third Year — First Semester. 

Heat engineering 120 
Mechanical laboratory 130 
Mechanics of materials 71 
Coal mining 81 
Geology (Geol. 2 and 21) 
Economiecs (Econ. 3) 
Engineering socicety 162 



Third Year — Second Semester. 



Kinetics 72 3 

Mechanical laboratory 131 2 

Hydraulics 73 - 2 

Coal mining 82 4 

Mining methods 88 4 
Money, banking and credits 

(Econ. 10) 2 

Engineering society 162 1 
Summer work (out of residence), Summer practice 164 — 2. 



18 



18 



Fourth Year — Second Semester. Fourth Year — Second Semester. 



Mine ventilation 83 3 

Mining design 86 2 

Structural engineering 144 3 

Electrical eng'g. 53 4 

Metallurgy 171 2 

Coal laboratory 96 1 

Business law 161 3 
Engineering society 163 



Thesis 99 

Concrete construction 147 

Field geology 62 



18 



English (Eng. 86) 1 

Mining design 87 3 

Mine management 84 1 

Electrical eng'g. 54 4 

Mining laboratory 95 3 

Cost accounting (Bus.Adm.4) 2 

Engineering society 163 1 
Inspection trip 

Options from the list below 3 18 



Economic geology (Geol. 11) 3 
Fuels 178 3 



198 West Virginia University 

GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING AND OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION. 

This option is planned to meet the needs of the engineer who is 
more interested in the geological aspect of mining than in the actual 
operation of a mining property. There is a growing demand for the 
so-called mining geologist who, while he has a thorough training in 
the fundamentals of engineering in general and of mining engineering 
in particular, yet is specially qualified to work out the detailed geo- 
logical features of mining properties and to make reports on them. 
This is peculiarly true in the case of oil and gas companies, where 
accurate geological knowledge in advance of actual drilling operations 
is of the greatest importance in the economical development of the 
field. Besides the opportunities offered by mining companies many of 
our railroads maintain corps of geologists while the several states 
and the federal government are continually carrying on geological 
investigations. This course also offers an excellent preparation for 
those who propose to carry on graduate work. 

In the junior year the course differs from the coal mining option 
in that organic chemistry and geological courses are substituted for 
the courses in coal mining. A course in field! geology in which the 
student prepares a geological map and a complete report on an as- 
signed area enables him to apply the geological knowledge he received 
in his sophomore year. The fundamentals of mining are studied in 
the senior year as well. The study of oil and gas geology treats of 
the origin, properties, distribution and mode of accumulation of oil 
and gas, and familiarizes the student with all the available sources of 
information on this subject. The courses in oil and .gas production 
and oil refining take up the subjects of the chemical and physical 
properties of petroleum and natural gas, their extraction and subse- 
quent treatment, the valuation of oil and gas properties, reports' on 
them, and the actual testing in laboratory of various oils, oil shales, 
and natural gas. 

A thorough grounding in the fundamentals of business is afforded 
by the courses in economics, money, banking and credits, business law 
and cost accounting. 

NOTE: See page 13, 'Special curricula for students with irregu- 
lar preparation. 



The College of Engineering 



199 



UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM IN MINING ENGINEERING 

(OIL AND GAS OPTION) 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Engineering of 

Mines. 



First Year — First Semester. 

Rhetoric and comp. (Eng. 1) 3 
Algebra and trigonometry 

(Math. 3 and 4) 5 

Inorganic chemistry (Chem.l) 4 

Mechanical drawing 20 2 

Military science (1) 1 

Shop work 9 2 
Engineering lectures 17 



First Year — Second Semester. 

Rhetoric and comp. (Eng. 2) 3 
Trigonometry and analytical 

geometry (Math. 5 and 6) 5 
Land surveying 100 3 

Inorganic chemistry (Chem. 2) 4 
Military science (2) 1 

Mechanical drawing 22 2 



IS 



Second Year — First Semester. Second Year — Second Semester. 



Differential calculus (Math.7) 3 

General physics (Phys. 5, 3) 5 

General geology (Geol. 2, 21) 3 

Mineralogy 89 1 

Descriptive geometry 26 3 

Empirical design 24 2 

Military science (3) 1 18 

Third Year — First Semester. 



Integral calculus (Math. 8) 3 
General phyisics (Phys. 6, 4) 5 
Historical geology (3, 31) 4 
Quan. analysis (Chem. 6) 5 
Military science (4) 1 18 



Third Year — Second Semester. 



Mechanics 76 
Advanced surveying 102 
Organic chemistry (Chem. 33) 
Metallurgy 171 
Pipe-fitting 10 
Economics (Econ. 3) 
Engineering society 162 



5 Mechanics 77 5 

2 Hydraulics 73 2 

5 Mine surveying 80 2 

2 Economic geology (Geol. 11) 3 
1 Field geology (Geol. 62) . 3 

3 Money, banking and credits 
18 (Econ. 10) 2 

Engineering society 162 1 18 
Summer work (out of residence), Summer practice 164 — 2. 
Summer work; Mine surveying 90 — 3. 

Fourth Year — First Semester. Fourth Year — Second Semester. 



Heat engineering 120 3 
Mechanical laboratory 130 2 
Oil and gas geology (Geol. 13) 3 

Coal mining 81 2 

Applied electricity 51 4 

Oil laboratory 185 1 

Business law 161 3 
Engineering society 163 18 



Concrete construction 147 3 

Coal mining 82 4 

Geology 12, 71, 81, 82 3 

Chemistry 7, 38, 60 3-5 



Mechanical laboratory 131 2 

English (Eng. 86) 1 

Oil and gas production 92 2 

Gedlogical surveying 98 2 

Fuels 178 3 

Oil refining 186 2 

Cost accounting (Bus.Adm.4) 2 
Inspection trip 

Engineering society 163 1 

Options from the list below 3 



Thesis 99 3 

Benzene Deriv. 180 2 



18 



200 West Virginia University 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING. 

The object of the four-year course in chemical engineering is to 
qualify young men to design, build, and manage manufacturing plants 
in which the products of manufacture are based on chemical processes 
and to fit men for professional employment as industrial chemists and 
chemical engineers. 

The curriculum outlined on the following page is designed to 
give the student a thorough knowledge of the fundamental principles 
of chemistry, a theoretical and practical training in mechanical engi- 
neering subjects including electrical engineering, and a thorough 
training in industrial chemistry and the more common engineering 
and industrial processes based on chemical reactions. 

The course includes theoretical and analytical' work in inorganic, 
organic and industrial chemistry, mathematics, physics, theoretical 
and applied mechanics, mechanical drawing, shop practice, structural 
engineering and industrial management, heat engineering, plant 
design, electrical engineering, mechanical and electrical laboratory, 
mineralogy and metallurgy and work in the strictly chemical engineer- 
ing subjects. The options in the senior year are in four groups; 
chemical, ceramic, metallurgical, and commercial! engineering. Thesis 
subjects will usually be selected from problems related to the develop- 
ment 'of the natural resources 1 of West Virginia as foundations for 
chemical industries. 

Students preparing to take the course in chemical engineering 
should present German for entrance. In order to provide time for a 
broader training in language, economics, history and science, and 
for additional courses in applied chemistry and engineering, students 
are recommended to take the combination Bachelor of Science and 
Engineering course. By a careful selection of electives both degrees 
may be secured in five years. 

Metallurgy Option. Students electing the Metallurgy Option in 
Chemical Engineering should take the following courses as their 
senior electives: Fuels 178 (3 Hrs.) ; Refractories 177 (1 Hr.); Metal- 
lurgy — Non-Ferrous 173 (2 Hrs.); and Metallurgy Laboratory 174 (2 
Hrs.). Thesis 185 (2i to 5 Hrs.) may be offered in place of one of the 
above courses by students who have shown marked ability along 
metallurgical lines. 

Ceramics Option. 'Students electing the Ceramic Option in Chem- 
ical Engineering should choose the following elective: Ceramics 175 
(2 Hrs.); Ceramics Laboratory 176 (1 Hr.) and Refractories 177 (1 
Hr.); Fuels 178 (3 Hrs.); Chemistry 26 (2 Hrs) or in place of the 
latter two Thesis 185 (2-5/ Hrs.). Students electing the Ceramic 
Option will be required to do their Summer Practice 164 in some ap- 
proved ceramic industry. 

NOTE: 'See page 13, Special curricula for student with irregu- 
lar preparation. 



The College of Engineering 



201 



UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM IN CHEMICAL 
ENGINEERING. 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Chemical 
Engineering. 



First Year — First Semester. 

Rhetoric and com p. (Eng. 1) 3 
Algebra and trig. (Math 3 

and 4) 5 

Inorganic chemistry (Chem.l) 4 
Military science (1) 1 

Mechanical drawing 20 2 

Pattern making 1 1 

Forging 7 1 17 

Engineering 'lectures 

Summer work; Machine Shop 

Second Year — First Semester. 

Differential calculus (Math.7) 3 
General physics (Phys.5, 3) 5 
Descriptive geometry 26 3 

Military science (3) -1 

Qual. analysis (Chem. 5.) 4 
Empirical Design 24 2 18 



First Year — Second Semester. 

Rhetoric and comp. (Eng. 2) 3 
Trigonometry and analytical 

geometry (Math. 5 and 6) 5 
Surveying 101 1 

Inorganic chemistry (Chem.2) 4 
Military science (2) 1 

Mechanical drawing 22 2 

Foundry 5 2 18 

11—2 and Pipe-fitting 10-1. 
Second Year — Second Semester. 
Integral calculus (Math. 8) 
General physics (Phys. 6, 4) 
Mechanism 29 
Military science (4) 
Quant, analysis (Chem. 6) 



18 



Summer work (out of residence), Summer practice 164 — 2. 



Third Year — First Semester. 

Mechanics 76 5 

Thermodynamics 121 3 

Mechanical laboratory 130 2 

Organic chemistry (Chem. 33) 5 
Elect, and mag. (Physics 23) 3 
Engineering society 162 18 

Fourth Year — First Semester. 

Chem. Eng'g and Mfg. 181 

and 182 4 

Electrical engineering 53 4 

Fuels 178 or Quant. Anal. 

(Chem. 7) 3 

Coal laboratory 96 1 

Metallurgy 171 and 172 3 

Economics (Econ. 13) 3 

Engineering society 163 18 



Third Year — Second Semester. 

Mechanics 77 5 

Machine design 35 2 

Machine drawing 36 2 

Mechanical laboratory 131 2 

Physical chem. (Chem. 60) 5 

Mineralogy 89 1 

Engineering society 162 ' 1 



IS 



Fourth Year — Second Semester. 

Chem. Eng'g and Mfg. 183 

and 184 4 

Electrical engineering 54 4 

English (English 86) 1 

Industrial management 46 1 

Hydraulics 73 2 

Engineering society 163 1 
Inspection trip 

Options from list below 5 18 



Chemical engineering courses 

173, 174, 175, 178, 180, 185, 

186, 187, 190, 192, 193, 196, 

197 2 to 5 

Geology (Geology 2) 3 

Electrical engineering 65 3 

Chemistry 39, 40, 51, 52, 62, 
189, 190, 192 1 to 5 



Power plant design 123 3 

Highway laboratory 136 
Business law 161 3 

Money, credit and banking 

(Econ. 10) 2 

Cost accounting (Bus.Adm.4) 2 



202 West Virginia University 

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION. 

The object of this course is to prepare men and women to teach 
related and vocational industrial subjects in high schools, vocational 
schools, night schools, part-time schools, and schools in industrial 
plants and to supervise work in connection with the administration 
of the federal vocational educational act. It is intended to give stu- 
dents a broad, flexible, practical education with required specializa- 
tion along at least two lines, designated below as major and minor 
groups. 

The major group may be chosen from any 'branch, of engineering 
offered in the College of Engineering as mining, mechanical, civil, 
chemical, or electrical. 

The minor group will be chosen from a second branch of engi- 
neering. No work offered as satisfying the conditions of the major 
group will be accepted as satisfying the minor group or vise versa. 

In addition to the shop courses 1 taken in the University, not less 
than 18 weeks of work must be done 'during the summer vacations. 
These shop courses, 210 and 211, will correlate with the major and 
minor groups. A monthly report will be required on the work done. 
This work carries a total credit of 5 hours. 

Those who have a satisfactory trade experience of two years be- 
yond the period of apprenticeship in accordance with the state plan 
for vocational education and who take this course will be eligible to 
teach their trade as well. 

The course of any candidate for a degree must include: 

Educational subjects 20 hrs. Mathematics 16 hrs. 
English 10 Shop and summer work 20 
Drawing 6 Major group 22 
Chemistry 10 Minor group 12 
Physics 10 Elective 18-22 
Military science (when re- 
quired) 4 

At least eight hours in industrial education including Courses 201 
and 202 are required. The rest of the work in education may be taken 
in the Department of Education. No course in industrial education is 
open without permission to students below junior standing. 

At the beginning of the junior year, the student will submit to 
the Faculty of the College of Engineering, through his class officer, 
his proposed course of study for his junior and senior years for their 
approval. 



The College of Engineering 



203 



UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM IN INDUSTRIAL 

EDUCATION. 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Industrial Education. 

First Year. 



First Semester. 

English 1 3 

Mathematics 3 and 4 5 

Chemistry 1 4 

Drawing 20 2 

Education 17 3 

Military science 1 1 



18 



Second Semester. 

English 2 3 

Mathematics 5 and 6 5 

Chemistry 2 4 

Drawing 22 2 

Shop work 3 

Military science 2 1 18 



First Semester. 



Mathematics 7 
Physics 5, 3 
Drawing 24, 25 
Education 12 
Chemistry 4 
Shop work 
Military science 



Second Year. 



Second Semester. 



18 



Mathematics 8 
Physics 6, 4 
Shop work 
Statics 70 
Elective 
Military science 4 



18 



Third and fourth years to be arranged, 
requirements. 



See preceding page for 



204 West Virginia University 

COMBINED SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING CURRICULUM. 

The following course of study is suggested for students who ex- 
pect to take an engineering degree after receiving the degree of Bache- 
lor of Science, or Who wish to take a general course with engineering 
subjects as a major: 

English composition (English 1 and 2) 6 hrs. 

English literature (English 3 and 4) 4 " 

Algebra and trignometry 7 " 

Analytical geometry and calculus 9 " 

Physics 3, 4, 5, 6 10 " 

Mechanics 70, 71, 72 10 " 

Chemistry 10 " 

Descriptive geometry 3 " 

Mechanical drawing 6 " 

One foreign language 20 " 

Botany, zoology, geology, or entomology, any one.. 8 " 

History, economics, or commerce, any one 8 " 

Military science (when required) 4 " 

Electives, preferably 'subjects that count toward 
both the bachelor of arts and engineering 

degrees 23 " 

Total 128 " 

Students who expect to take a degree in civil engineering should 
include Geology 2, 11, and 21; Land Surveying 100, Mechanical Draw- 
ing 25, Hydraulics 73, Applied Electricity 51 and Shop Work 9. 

Applicants for a degree in mechanical or electrical engineering 
should include ten hours in shop work, Empirical Design 24, Mech- 
anism 29, Surveying 101, and Physios 23, Machine Design 35 and 36. 

Applicants for a degree in mining engineering should include 
Geology 2 and 21, Chemistry 6, Land surveying 100, Mineralogy 89, 
Shop Work 9 and Mechanical drawing 25. 

The requirements of tne economics and history group may be 
met by taking Economics 3 and 11, 'Business Administration 4, and 
Business Law 161. 

Students desiring to specialize in economics and business ad- 
ministration are advised to take one or more of the following groups 
in addition to the minimum requirements: Business Administration 
1, 2, and 3; 21, 22, and 26; 31, 32, and 46; Economics 12, 14, and 15; 
13, 40, and 41. 

Students who wish to prepare for teaching science, engineering 
or industrial subjects, may with the approval of the Committee on 
Classification and Grades substitute eight hours in education for an 
equivalent amount of required work in the science and history groups. 

By following the above curriculum students may receive both the 
B.S. degree and the engineering degree in five to five and one-half 
years. 



The College of Engineering 205 

SPECIAL ENGINEERING CURRICULA. 

1. Elective Groups for Students in Other Colleges. Candidates 
for degrees other than engineering degrees, and special students in 
any department of the University, are permitted to elect subjects in 
the College of Engineering, provided, in each case, they have had the 
subjects specified as prerequisites. Students who wish to take a 
general classical or scientific course of study before taking the engi- 
neering curriculum are advised to carry their mathematics as far as 
called for by the engineering curriculum, and to take some of their 
elective work in the College of Engineering. The engineering instruc- 
tors will advise them what is the best to elect. 

Credits are given in the College of Arts and Sciences for the fol- 
lowing engineering courses: 

Subject. • Credit Hours. 

Mechanical drawing 20-25 8 

Descriptive geometry 26 3 

Mechanism 29 4 

Industrial engineering 47 3 

Elements of electrical engineering 50 4 

Applied electricity 51 3 

Elements of electrical engineering 53, 54 8 

Direct current machinery 5?. 4 

Theory of alternating currents 55 3 

Alternating current machinery 56 3 

Electrical laboratory 560, 600 4 

Statics 70 3 

Mechanics of materials 71 4 

Hydraulics 73 2 

Kinetics 72 3 

Mineralogy 89 1 

Metallurgy 171, 172 3 

Surveying 100, 101, 102 5 

Thermodynamics 121 3 

Heating and ventilating 127 3 

Heat engines 122 3 

Geological surveying 98 2 

Industrial education 205, 221 and 200 6 

In addition to the above the student may elect with the consent 
of his class officer, when his major subject is physics or education: 

Engineering 1-18 (Mechanic arts) 10 

2. Partial Curriculum. Students who have not the time or are 
otherwise unable to take a full curriculum, will be allowed to take a 
special or partial curriculum, consisting of such studies as they are 
prepared to take, provided that such curriculum shall have been ap- 
proved by the class officer. For further information see statement 
of requirements for admission as special students. 



206 West Virginia University 

SUMMER TERM. 

A summer term lasting six weeks is given immediately after the 
close of each collegiate year. The following courses are regularly 
scheduled for the summer term and should be taken at that time by 
all regular engineering students (see curricula, pages 16 to 27) : 
Chemical; Pipe Fitting 10 

Machine Work 11 

Mechanical and Electrical; Machine Work 13 
Civil; Surveying 109 and 110 

Mining; (Surveying 90. 

Other regular engineering courses are offered as follows; 
Pattern Making 1 and 4 
Woodworking 3 
Forging 7 and 8 
Mechanical Drawing 20 and 22 
Empirical Design 24 
Descriptive Geometry 26 
Mechanics 70, 71 and 72 
Hydraulics 73 
Roofs and Bridges 141 
Industrial Education 212 and 221. 

In addition, the faculty of the College of Arts and Sciences usu- 
ally offers courses required or accepted for the engineering degrees 
as follows: 

Chemistry 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, and 33 

Economics IS, 2S and US 

English 1 and 2 

Geology 2S 

Solid Geometry 2 

Algebra 3 

Trigonometry 4 and 6 

Analytical Geometry 5 

Calculus 7 and 8 

Physics 3, 4, 5 and 6. 

These opportunities are of advantage to irregular students who 
have deficiencies to remove in these subjects and they are urged to 
adjust their work to the regular schedules at the earliest possible 
time. Regular students who have completed the required summer 
courses are advised to spend their vacations in practical work, for 
which credit may be given under Summer Practice 164. 



The College of Engineering 207 

CURRICULA FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS IN 
ENGINEERING. 

Graduate courses lead to the professional degrees of Master of 
Science in Civil Engineering, Master of Science in Mechanical Engi- 
neering, Master of Science in Electrical Engineering, Master of 
Science in Engineering of Mines, and Master of Science in Chemical 
Engineering, respectively. They consist of advanced engineering 
courses aggregating thirty-two semester hours of which eight hours 
may be a thesis, and require one year of resident study and work at 
the University. 

A candidate for a professional degree is required to have com- 
pleted the prescribed four-year curriculum of undergraduate study in 
that department of the college in which he proposes to take a degree, 
or to have completed such a curriculum or its equivalent at some other 
institution of recognized standing, conferring the same or an equiva- 
lent baccalaureate degree. In the latter case, the diploma and other 
certificates of proficiency should be presented. 

There is no fixed curriculum of subjects for any of these degrees, 
but the curriculum of study or investigation is arranged to suit the 
needs of each candidate, subject to the University regulations gov- 
erning candidates for the master's degree. Each candidate for a de- 
gree must select his major subject in the department in which his 
degree is to be taken and submit a thesis showing attainment in some 
phase of this subject. 

PROFESSIONAL DEGREES FOR WORK IN ABSENTIA. 

The University confers the following professional degrees: Civil 
Engineer (C.E.), Mechanical Engineer (M.E.), Electrical Engineer 
(E.E.), and Engineer of Mines (E.M.), upon graduates of the College 
of Engineering of the West Virginia University on the basis of prac- 
tical experience and study in absentia, the presentation of a thesis 
and an oral final examination. 

To be eligible a candidate for a professional degree must have 
been in active practice of his profession for at least five years since 
receiving his first degree and must have been in responsible charge 
of important work for at least two years, and must be qualified to 
design as well as direct engineering work. 

Application for registration as a candidate for a degree should be 
made not later than the first day of October in the year in which the 
degree is expected. Detailed regulations and registration blanks may 
be obtained from the Dean of the College of Engineering. 



208 West Virginia University 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

In the following' announcements, the name of the course is fol- 
lowed by its credit value in semester hours, A credit of one semester 
hour is given for a lecture or recitation course meeting one hour per 
week for one semester and requiring two hours of preparation for 
each lecture or recitation. 

•Credit for practical work in the shops, drawing rooms, labora- 
tories and field, is given on the basis of the actual time required, 
including the preparation of reports and the writing of notes, three 
hours of actual work counting as one recitation hour. 

Courses starred (*) may be taken as undergraduate work by 
students in colleges other than the College of Engineering. 

DRAWING, MACHINE DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION. 

Professors Hayes and Gill, Assistant Professors Grow and White 

nnd Messrs. West, Seaman, H. M. Cather, Carl, Stillman, 

Gnagey and Scott. 

1. Pattern Making. (1 Hr.) Ellementary principles of pattern 
making. Prerequisite: A knowledge of the use of woodworking tools 
and the ability to make satisfactorily the principal joints used in 
woodwork. Those who have not bad practice in woodworking will 
be expected to take a short intensive course in joinery before taking 
up the pattern work. 

Both semesters; two three-hour periods weekly, one-half semes- 
ter only. Messrs. Seaman and Stillman. (Also given in Summer 
Term.) 

3. Woodworking. (2 or 3 Hrs.) The use of woodworking ma- 
chinery in the construction of cabinet work. Prerequisite: The same 
as for Pattern Making 1. 

Both semesters; hours to be arranged; Mr. Seaman and Mr. 
Stillman. (Also given in Summer Session.) 

4. Pattern Making. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisite : Pattern Making 1, 
and Foundry 5. 

Both semesters; two three-hour periods weekly; Mr. Seaman 
and Mr. Stillman. 

5. Foundry Work. (2 Hrs.) 

Both semesters; two three-hour periods weekly; Mr. Seaman 
and Mr. Carl. 

6. Foundry Work. Advanced work for special students. Con- 
tinuation of Foundry 5. 

Semesters and hours to be arranged; Mr. Seaman and Mr. Carl. 



The College of Engineering 209 

7. Forging. (1 Hr.) 

Both semesters; two three-hour periods weekly, one-half semes- 
ter only; Mr. West. 

8. Forging. Advanced work for special students. Continuation 
of Forging 7. 

Hours to be arranged; Mr. West. 

9. Shop Work. (2 Hrs.) For civil and mining engineering stu- 
dents only. 

First semester; two three-hour periods weekly; Mr. West, Mr. 
Seaman and Mr. Gnagey. 

10. Pipe Fitting. (1 Hr.) Required of all candidates for degrees 
in mechanical, mining, and chemical engineering. 

Both semesters; two three-hour periods w r eekly, one-half semes- 
ter only; Mr. West. 

11. Machine Work. (2 Hrs.) Hand work and elementary ma- 
chine work. Lectures and shop practice. 

Both semesters; two three-hour periods weekly; Professor Gill 
and Mr. Gnagey. 

12. Machine Work. (1 Hr.) A continuation of Machine Work 
11, which is a prerequisite. Lectures and shop practice. 

Both semesters; two three-hour periods weekly, one-half semes- 
ter; Professor Gill and Mr. Gnagey. 

13. Machine Work. (3 Hrs.) Hand work and elements of ma- 
chine work. Lectures and shop work. Equivalent to courses 11 
and 12. 

Summer term, four hours per day for six weeks; Professor Gill 
and Mr. Gnagey. 

14. Machine Work. (1 Hr.) A continuation of Machine Work 
11 and 12 or Machine Work 13 which is a prerequisite. 

Both semesters; two three-hour periods weekly for one-half se- 
mester; Professor Gill and Mr. Gnagey. 

15. Machine Construction. (2 Hrs.) Continuation of Machine 
Work 14. 

Both semesters; two three-hour periods weekly; Professor Gill 
and Mr. Gnagey. 

16. Shop Methods. (2 Hrs.) A continuation of Machine Con- 
struction 15. Shop laboratory work, lectures, inspection trips, spe- 
cial investigations. 

Second semester; two three-hour periods weekly; Professor Gill 
and Mr. Gnagey. 



210 West Virginia University 

17. Machine Construction. Advanced work for special students. 
Continuation of Machine Construction 15 and Shop Methods 16. 
Hours to be arranged; Professor Gill. 

20.* Mechanical Drawing. (2 Hrs.) 

Both semesters; two three-hour periods weekly; Assistant Pro- 
fessor Grow, Mr. H. M. Cather and Mr. Scott. 

22.* Mechanical Drawing. (2 Hrs.) Continuation of Mechanical 
Drawing 20. 

Both semesters; two three-hour periods weekly; Assistant Pro- 
fessors Grow and White, Mr. H. M. Cather and Mr. Scott. 

23.* Mechanical Drawing. (2 Hrs.) Elective for students in 
agriculture. 

Second semester; Assistant Professor Grow. 

24.* Empirical Design. (2 Hrs.) Continuation of Mechanical 
Drawing 22. Prerequisite: Machine work 11 or 13. 

Both semesters; two three-hour periods weekly; Assistant Pro- 
fessors Grow and White and Mr. H. M. Cather. 

25.* Mechanical Drawing. (2i Hrs.) Continuation of Mechanical 
Drawing 22. 

First semester; two three-hour periods weekly; Assistant Pro- 
fessor Grow and Mr. H. M. Cather. 

26.* Descriptive Geometry. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisite: Mechanical 
Drawing 20, and Solid Geometry. 

Both semesters; three periods weekly; Professor Morris, Pro- 
fessor Hayes, Assistant Professor Grow and Mr. H. M. Cather. 

29. Mechanism. (4 Hrs.) Lectures, recitations and drawing 
problems. Prerequisites: Mechanical Drawing 22 and Descriptive 
Geometry 2'6. 

Both semesters; two one-hour and two three hour periods 
weekly; Professor Hayes, Assistant Professors Grow and White, 
and Mr. H. M. Cather. 

35. Machine Design. (2 Hrs.) To accompany Machine Draw- 
ing 36. Prerequisites: Mechanics 71 and Mechanism 29. 

Both semesters; two periods weekly Professor Hayes. 

36. Machine Drawing. (2 Hrs.) To accompany Machine De- 
sign 35. 

Both semesters; two three-hour periods weekly; Professor Hayes 
and Assistant Professor White. 



The College of Engineering 211 

37. Advanced Machine Design. (2 Hrs.) Continuation of Ma- 
chine Design 35. To accompany Designing and Drawing 38. Lec- 
tures and recitations. 

First semester; two periods weekly; Professor Hayes. 

38. Designing and Drawing. (2 Hrs.) To accompany Advanced 
Machine Design 37. 

First semester; two three-hour periods weekly; Professor Hayes 
and Assistant Professor White. 

39. Steam Engine Design. (2 Hrs.) To accompany Designing 
and Drawing 40. Lectures and recitations. Prerequisites: Machine 
Design 35 and 37 and Machine Drawing 36 and 38. 

Second semester; two periods weekly; Professor Hayes. 

40. Designing and Drawing. (2 Hrs.) To accompany Steam 
Engine Design 39. 

Second semester; two three-hour periods weekly; Professor 
Hayes. 

41. Designing and Drawing. (2 Hrs.) Continuation in the 
drawing room of Power-plant Design 123. 

Second semester; two three-hour periods weekly; Professor 
Hayes and Mr. H. M. Cather. 

45. Gas Engine Design. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisite: Machine De- 
sign 35. 

Second semester; hours to be arranged; Professor Hayes. 

46.* Industrial Management. (1 Hr.) 

Second semester; one period weekly; Professor Hayes. 

47.* Industrial Engineering. (3 Hrs.) 

Second semester; three periods weekly; Professor Hayes. 

49. Thesis. (3 Hrs.) The working out of some special problems 
in design or construction or both. See general thesis requirements, 
page 15. 

Hours to be arranged; Professor Hayes. 



212 West Virginia University 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 

Professor Forman, Professor Hall and Mr. Lloyd. 

50.* Elements of Electrical Engineering with Laboratory. (4 
Hrs.) Primarily for third year students in electrical engineering. 
One laboratory period a week. Prerequisite: Physics 6. 

First semester; Professor Forman and Mr. Lloyd. 

51.* Applied Electricity. (4 Hrs.) Primarily for third year 
students in civil engineering. One laboratory period a week. Pre- 
requisite: Physics 6. 

Both semesters; Professor Forman and Mr. Lloyd. 

52.* Direct Current Machinery. (4 Hrs.) To follow Engineer- 
ing 50. One laboratory period a week. 

Second semester; Professor Hall and Mr. Lloyd. 

53.* Elements of Electrical Engineering. (4 Hrs.) For fourth 
year students in mechanical, mining and chemical engineering. Ac- 
companied by Electrical Laboratory. Prerequisite: Physics 23. 

First semester; Professor Hall and Mr. Lloyd. 

54.* Elements of Electrical Engineering. (4 Hrs.) A continu- 
ation of Engineering 53. 

Second semester; Professor Forman and Mr. Lloyd. 

55.* Alternating Current Theory and Measurements. (3 Hrs.) 
One laboratory period bi-weekly. Prerequisite: Engineering 50. 
Second semester; Professor Forman. 

56.* Alternating Current Machinery. (3 Hrs.) Continuation of 
Engineering 55. Accompanied by Electrical Engineering Labora- 
tory 560. 

First semester; Professor Forman. 

560.* Electrical Engineering Laboratory. (2 Hrs.) To accom- 
pany Engineering 56. 

First semester; Professor Forman and Mr. Lloyd. 

57. Electric Traction. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisite: Engineering 56. 
Second semester; Professor Hall, 

58. Illumination and Signalling. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisite: 
Physics 6. 

First semester; Professor Forman. 

590. Electrical Design and Calculations. (3 Hrs.) Nine hours 
a week in the designing room. Prerequisite: D. C. Machinery 52. 
First semester; Professor Hall. 



The College of Engineering 



213 



600. Advanced Electrical Laboratory. 

A. C. Machinery 56. 

Second semester; Professor Forman. 



(2 Hrs.) Prerequisite: 



610. Electric Construction. (2 Hrs.) Special construction work 
assigned to students according to previous experience. Assignments 
for reports, will be made by the instructor to engineering literature 
and to electrical equipment outside the University laboratories. 

Both semesters; Professor Hall and Mr. Lloyd. 

62, (162). Transients, Surges and Electric Waves. (3 Hrs.) 

Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering 56. 
Second semester; Professor Forman. 



63. Electric Generation and Distribution. 

site: Engineering 54. 

First semester; Professor Hall. 

630. Electric Generation and Distribution. 

Engineering 63. 

Second semester; Professor Hall. 



(3 Hrs.) Prerequi- 



(3 Hrs.) To follow 



640, (164). Electrical Research. For graduate students only. 
Hours and credits to be arranged; Professor Forman. 

65, (165). Industrial Applications of Electricity. (3 Hrs.) Pre- 
requisite: Electrical Engineering 56. 
Second semester; Professor Hall. 

67, (167). High Tension Dielectric Phenomena. (3 Hrs.) Pre- 
requisite: Engineering 55. 

Second semester; Professor Forman. 

68, (168). Telephone Engineering. (3 Hrs.) One laboratory 
period a week. Prerequisite: Engineering 55. 

Second semester; Professor Forman. 

69, (169). Thesis. (3 Hrs.) Special investigation or original re- 
search on some topic relating to electrical engineering. 

Professor Forman and Professor Hall. 



214 West Virginia University 

MECHANICS. 

Professor Boomsliter and Assistant Professor Cather. 

70.* Statics. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisite: Integral Caluculus. 
Second semester; Professor Boomsliter and Assistant Professor 
Cather. 

71.*Mechanies of Materials. (4 Hrs.) Prerequisite: Statics 70. 
First semester; Professor Boomsliter and Assistant Professor 
Cather. 

72.* Kinetics. (3 Hrs.) Continuation of Statics 70. Prerequi- 
site: Statics 70. 

Second semester; Professor Boomsliter and Assistant Professor 
Cather. 

73.* Hydraulics. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisite: Kinetics 72. 
Both semesters; Professor Davis (Department of Structural 
and Hydraulic Engineering). 

76. Mechanics. (5 Hrs.) Includes statics 70, and first half of 
Mechanics and Materials 71. Not offered after 1925-26. 

First semester; Professor Boomsliter and Assistant Professor 
Cather, 

77. Mechanics. (5 Hrs.) Continuation of Course 76. Includes 
last half of Mechanics of Materials 71 and Kinetics 72. Not offered 
after 1925-26. 

Second semester; Professor Boomsliter and Assistant Professor 
Cather. 

NOTE: Mechanics 76 and 77 are intended for students who have 
taken Mathematics 13 and 14 in the sophomore year. 



The College of Engineering 215 

MINING ENGINEERING. 

Associate Professor Lawall and Assistant Professor Fraser. 

80. Mine Surveying. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisite: Advanced Sur- 
veying 102. 

Second semester; Associate Professor Lawall. 

81. Mining. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisite: Chemistry 6, Physics 6. 
First semester; Assistant Professor Fraser. 

82. Coal Mining. (4 Hrs.) Prerequisite: Coal Mining 81. 
Second semester; Associate Professor Lawall. 

83. Mine Ventilation. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisite: Coal Mining 81 
and 82. 

First semester; Associate Professor Lawall. 

84. Mine Management. (1 Hr.) Prerequisite: Coal Mining 82. 
Second semester; Associate Professor Lawall. 

86. Mine Design. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisite: Coal Mining 82 and 
registration in Structural Engineering 144. 

First semester; Associate Professor Lawall and Assistant Pro- 
fessor Fraser. 

87. Mine Design. (3 Hrs.) Continuation of Mine Design 86, 
which is prerequisite. » 

Second semester; Associate Professor Lawall and Assistant Pro- 
fessor Fraser. 

88. Mining Methods. (4 Hrs.) A study of the coal fields and 
mining methods of West Virginia and the United States. Supplement- 
ed by field work in the vicinity of Morgantown. Inspection trips, with 
written reports, are required. Prerequisite: Coal Mining 82. 

Second semester; Assistant Professor Fraser. 

89. Elementary Mineralogy. (1 Hr.) Prerequisite: Chemistry 2. 
Either semester; Assistant Professor Fraser. 

90. Mine Surveying. (3 Hrs.) This course is a continuation 
of and gives practice supplementing Mine Surveying 80. It must be 
taken during the summer term immediately following the semester 
in which Course 80 is taken. 

Summer term; eighteen working days, 8:00-12:00 and 1:00-5:00; 
Associate Professor Lawall and Assistant Professor Fraser. 



216 West Virginia University 

92. Oil and Gas Production. (2 Hrs.) Addresses by oil and gas 

producers and other experts constitute a part of this course. Pre- 
requisite: Geology 13. 

Second semester; Associate Professor Scheffel (Department of 
Geology), 112 M. H. 

95. Mining Laboratory. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisite: Coal Mining 
82 and Coal Laboratory 96. 

Second semester; Associate Professor Lawall. 

96. Coal Laboratory. (1 Hr.) Prerequisite: Chemistry 6. 
First semester; Associate Professor Lawall. 

98.* Geological Surveying. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisite: Mine Sur- 
veying 90 and Field Geology 17. 

Second semester; Assistant Professor Fraser. 

99. Thesis. (3 Hrs.) An individual problem on some phase of 
mining. None but exceptional students having high scholastic stand- 
ing will be permitted to elect this course. 



The College of Engineering 217 

RAILWAY AND HIGHWAY ENGINEERING AND SURVEYING. 

Professor Morris and Mr. Nelson. 

100.* Land Surveying. (3 Hrs.) Required of all candidates for 
degrees in civil and mining engineering. Lectures, recitations, field 
practice. 

Both semesters; Professor Morris and Mr. Nelson. 

101.* Surveying. (1 Hr.) Primarily for first year students. 
Required for degrees in mechanical, electrical, and chemical engineer- 
ing. Prerequisite: Plane trigonometry. 

Second semester; Professor Morris and Mr. Nelson. 

102. Advanced Surveying. (2 Hrs.) Continuation of Surveying 
100. 

Both semesters; Professor Morris and Mr. Nelson. 

103. Topographical Surveying. (2 Hrs.) Lectures, recitations, 
field practice and map drawing. Prerequisite: Land Surveying 100. 

Second semester; Professor Morris. 

104. Railway Location. (3 Hrs.) Lectures, recitations, field 
work, and drawing. Prerequisite: Land Surveying 100. 

First semester; Professor Morris. 

105. Railway Construction and Maintenance. (3 Hrs.) Pre- 
requisite: Railway Location 104. 

Both semesters; Professor Morris. 

106. Roads and Pavements. (3 Hrs.) Lectures, recitations and 
field work. 

First semester; Professor Morris. 

107. Railroad Economy. (2 Hrs.) 
Second semester; Professor Morris. 

108. Highway Economics. (2 Hrs.) Continuation of Roads and 
Pavements 106, with special reference to permanent improvements 
and maintenance of existing roads. 

Second semester; Professor Morris. 

109. Surveying. (1 Hr.) Surveying practice supplementing 
Courses Nos. 100, 102 and 103. Prerequisite: Topographical Survey- 
ing 103. 

Summer term; first six working days, 8:00-12:00 and 1:00-5:00; 
Professor Morris. 



218 West Virginia University 

110. Railroad Surveying. (2 Hrs.) Surveying practice supple- 
menting Railway Location 104. Prerequisite: Railway Location 104. 

Summer term; first twelve working days, 8:00-12:00 and 1:00- 
5:00; Professor Morris. 

113. Thesis. (3 Hrs.) Optional thesis requirement for the de- 
gree of B.S.C.E. (See page 189.) 

Second semester; hours to be arranged; Professor Morris. 

STEAM, GAS AND EXPERIMENTAL ENGINEERING. 

Professor Grumbein and Mr. Amidon. 

120. Heat Engineering. (3 Hrs.) Arranged especially for civil 
and mining engineering students. Prerequisite : Physics 5 and 3 and 
Integral Calculus. 

First semester; Mr. Amidon. 

121.* Thermodynamics of Engineering. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisites: 
Physics 5 and 3, and Integral Calculus. 
First semester; Professor Grumbein. 

122* Heat Engines. (3 Hrs.) Continuation of Thermodynamics 
121. 

Second semester; Professor Grumbein. 

123. Power Plant Design. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisite: Thermodyna- 
mics 121. 

First semester; Professor Grumbein. 

124. Steam Boilers. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisites: Machine Design 
35 and Thermodynamics 121. 

Hours to be arranged; Professor Grumbein. 

125. Steam Turbines. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisite: Heat Engines 122. 
Second semester; Professor Grumbein. 

126. Gas Engines and Gas Engineering. (3 Hrs.) Fuel gases, 
gas production and transmission, gas engines, etc. Prerequisite: 
Heat Engines 122. 

Second semester; Professor Grumbein. 

127.* Heating and Ventilating. (3 Hrs.) Optional for students 
in mechanical engineering. Prerequisite: Thermodynamics 121, or 
Heat Engineering 120. 

Second semester; Professor Grumbein. 



The College of Engineering 219 

130. Mechanical Laboratory. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisites :Physics 6 
and Statics 70, and accompanying- Heat Engineering 120 or Thermo- 
dynamics 121. 

First semester; Professor Grumbein and Mr. Amidon. 

131. Mechanical Laboratory. (2 Hrs.) Continuation of Mechani- 
cal laboratory 130. Prerequisites: Mechanical Laboratory 130 and 
Mechanics of Materials 71. 

Second semester; Professor Grumbein and Mr. Amidon. 

132. Engineering Laboratory. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisite: Mechani- 
cal Laboratory 131. 

First semester; Professor Grumbein and Mr. Amidon. 

133. Engineering Laboratory. (2 Hrs.) Continuation of Lab- 
oratory 132. Prerequisite: Engineering Laboratory 132. 

Second semester; Professor Grumbein and Mr. Amidon. 

134. Engineering Laboratory. Open only to graduates. Com- 
mercial tests and research work. Prerequisite: Engineering Labora- 
tory 133. Credit will be given on the basis of the time spent in the 
laboratory and the progress of the students. 

Hours to be arranged; Dean Jones and Professor Grumbein 

135. Thesis. (3 Hrs.) Investigation or original research on 
some special topic relating to steam, gas or experimental engineering. 

Second semester; Professor Grumbein. 

136. Highway Laboratory. Open to fourth year and graduate 
students in civil, mechanical, chemical, and mining engineering. Credit 
will be given on basis of time spent in the laboratory and progress of 
the student. 

Hours to be arranged; Professor Grumbein. 



220 West Virginia University 

STRUCTURAL AND HYDRAULIC ENGINEERING. 

Professor Davis and Mr. L. V. Carpenter. 

141. Roofs and Bridges. (4 Hrs.) Prerequisite: Mechanics of 
Materials 71. 

Second semester. Professor Davis and Mr. Carpenter. 

142. Bridge Design. (4 Hrs.) Prerequisite; Roofs and Bridges 
141. 

First semester. Professor Davis and Mr. Carpenter. 

143. Advanced Structures. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisite: Roofs and 
Bridges 141. 

Second semester. Professor Davis and Mr. Carpenter. 

144. Structural Engineering. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisite: Mechanics 
of Materials 71. 

First semester. Professor Davis and Mr. Carpenter. 

145. iSteel Building Design. (3 Hrs.) As a part of this course 
a small mill building is completely designed and show drawings made 
for it. Prerequisite: Roofs and Bridges 141. 

Either semester. Professor Davis. 

146. Foundations and Masonry. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisites: Me- 
chanics of Materials 71, and Mechanical Laboratory 130. 

First semester. Professor Davis and Mr. Carpenter. 

147. Concrete Construction. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisites: Roofs and 
Bridges 141. 

Second semester. Professor Davis and Mr. Carpenter. 

148. Sanitary Engineering. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisite: Hydraulics 
73. 

Second semester. Mr. Carpenter. 

149. Water Supply Engineering. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisite: Hy- 
draulics 73. 

First semester. Professor Davis and Mr. Carpenter. 

150. Water Power Engineering. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisite: Hy- 
draulics 73. 

Second semester. Professor Davis. 



The College of Engineering 221 

151. Hydraulic Measurements. (1 Hr.) Prerequisite: Hydraulics 
73. 

Either semester. Professor Davis. 

152. Thesis. (3 Hrs.) Special design, investigation or original 
research on some assigned topic relating to structural, hydraulic or 
sanitary engineering. 

Second semester. Professor Davis. 

153. Sewage and Water Purification Works. (2 Hrs.) A con- 
tinuation of Courses 148 and 149. Prerequisites: Sanitary Engineering 
148 and Water Supply Engineering 149. 

Both semesters. Mr. Carpenter. 

154. ..Statically Indeterminate Structures. Open only to grad- 
uate students. A continuation of Course 143. Prerequisite: Course 
143. 

Credit and hours to be arranged. 
Both semesters. Professor Davis. 

155. Advanced Bridge Design. Computation and drawings for 
some type of statically indeterminate structure. Prerequisite: Courses 
143 and 142. 

Credit and hours to be arranged. 
Both semesters. Professor Davis. 

156. Materials of Construction. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisite: Mechan- 
ics of Materials 71. 

First semester. Mr. Carpenter. 

157. Advanced Water Power Engineering. A continuation of 
Course 150 with special emphasis on hydrology and the design of 
turbines. Open only to graduate students. 

Credit and hours to be arranged. 
Both semesters. Professor Davis. 

158. Statically Indeterminate Structures. A continuation of 
Course 154. Open only to graduate students. 

Credit and hours to be arranged. 
Both semesters. Professor Davis. 



222 West Virginia University 

GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS. 

161*. Business Law. (3 Hrs.) General principles of business 
law. The law of contracts. Standard contract forms. Prerequisite: 
Economics 3 or 1 and 2, and Mechanics 71. 

First semester; Professor Boomsliter. 

162. Engineering Society. (1 Hr.) Primarily for third year 
students. Required of all candidates for degreesi in engineering. 
Membership, attendance and active participation in the Engineering 
Society. See special announcements, page 184. 

Throughout the year; bi-weekly; Professor Grumbein, 226 M. H. 

163. Engineering Society. (1 Hr.) For fourth year and gradu- 
ate students. Required of all candidates for degrees in engineering. 
Continuation of Engineering Society 162. 

Throughout the year; bi-weekly; Professor Grumbein, 226 M. H. 

164. Summer Practice. (2 Hrs.) Required of all candidates for 
degrees in engineering. At least six weeks of practical experience in 
some branch of engineering activity, preferably of a character that 
will articulate with the student's major subjects. Students are rec- 
ommended to spend all vacation periods in practical work but under 
exceptional circumstances the Faculty of the College of Engineering 
may permit the substitution of an approved practical course taken 
in residence. Application for summer credit should be made before 
beginning the work; and the work done should be certified and re- 
ported in accordance with the special rules for Summer Practice, on 
or before October 1st, after the work has been done. Work may be 
done during any vacation period. 

165. Engineering Lectures. (No credit.) Required of all fresh- 
men in engineering. A series of lectures designed to acquaint the 
engineering student at the beginning of his course with the profes- 
sion he has chosen. Factors determining choice of engineering as a 
profession; the various kinds of engineering and the ability, training, 
opportunities, and responsibilities involved in each; problems and diffi- 
culties of the engineering student; the engineering point of view as 
applied to the student's daily environment and college life. 

First semester; W., 4:30 p. m.; Professor Boomsliter. 



/ 

The College of Engineering 223 

CHEMICAL AND METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING. 

Professor Hodge and Assistant Professor Koehler. 

171. Metallurgy of Iron and Steel. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisite: Chem- 
istry 6. 

First semester. Professor Hodge. 

172*. Metallurgy Laboratory. (1 Hr.) To accompany Course 
171. Preparation and microscopical examination of twenty-five speci- 
mens of iron and steel; analytical determinations. 

First semester. Professor Hodge and Assistant Professor Koeh- 
ler. 

173. Metallurgy, Non-Ferrous. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisites: Chemis- 
try 6 and Mechanical Laboratory 131. 

Second semester. Professor Hodge. 

174. Metallography Laboratory. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisites: Chem- 
lurgy 171, 172 and 173 and Chemistry 60. 

Second semester. Professor Hodge. 

175. Ceramics. (2 Hrs.) A review of the ceramic industries. 
Chemical and engineering principles applied in the manufacture of 
ceramic materials, pottery, enamels and glass. Prerequisite: Chem- 
istry 21. 

Either semester. Assistant Professor Koehler. 

176. Ceramics Laboratory. (1 Hrs.) Working and testing of 
clays. Compounding of bodies, glazes, and enamels. Biscuit and 
glost firing; firing of enamel ware. Factory control tests. Prerequi- 
site: Chemical Engineering 175. 

Either semester. Assistant Professor Koehler. 

177. Refractories. (1 Hr.) Manufacture, properties, and uses 
of refractory materials. Standard tests. Study of phase rule dia- 
grams of refractory materials. Prerequisite :Chemistry 21. 

Either semester. Assistant Professor Koehler. 

178. Fuels. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisites: Chemistry 6 and Mechan- 
ical Laboratory 130. Recitations and laboratory. 

Either semester. Professor Hodge and Assistant Professor 
Koehler. 



224 West Virginia University 

179. Glass. (2 Hrs.) Physical! and chemical properties of glass. 
Methods of analysis of glass and of raw materials. Theory and fac- 
tory practice of manufacture. Prerequisite: Chemical Engineering 
175. 

Both semesters. Assistant Professor Koehler. 

180. Benzene Derivatives. (2 Hrs.) Manufacture of commer- 
cial products from benzene and related compounds; intermediates, 
dyes, drugs and explosives. Prerequisite: Chemistry 33. Recitation 
and laboratory. 

Second semester. Professor Hodge. 

181f. Chemical Engineering and Manufactures. (2 Hrs.) Pre- 
requisites: Chemistry 60 and Mechanical (Laboratory 131. 
First semester. Professor Hodge. 

182. Industrial; Chemistry Laboratory. (2 Hrs.) To accom- 
pany Course 181. 

First semester. Professor Hodge and Assistant Professor 
Koehler. 

183. Chemical Engineering and Manufactures. (2 Hrs.) Con- 
tinuation of Course 181. 

Second semester. Professor Hodge. 

184. Chemical Engineering Laboratory. (2 Hrs.) To accom- 
pany Course 183. Continuation of Course 1'82. 

Second semester. Professor Hodge and Assistant Professor 
Koehler. 

185. Oil Laboratory. (1 Hr.) Primarily for students taking the 
Oil and Gas Option. Prerequisite: Chemistry 6. 

First semester. Assistant Professor Koehler. 

186. Oil Refining Laboratory. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisites: Chem- 
istry 33 and Mechanical Laboratory 131. 

Second semester. Professor Hodge. 

187. Water Examination and Purification. (2 Hrs.) Prerequi- 
site: Chemistry 6. Recitations and laboratory. 

First semester. Professor Hodge. 

190. Electrochemical Industries. (3 Hrs.) Primarily for grad- 
uate students; open to qualified chemical engineering seniors. Pre- 
requisites: Electrical Engineering 53, and Chemistry 60. 

Second semester. Assistant Professor Koehler. 



The College of Engineering 225 

192. Biochemical Industries. (3 Hrs.) Primarily for graduate 
students. Open to qualified seniors in chemical engineering. Pre- 
requisites: Chemical Engineering 183 and 184. 

First semester. Professor Hodge. 

193. Coal Tar and By-Products. Open only to graduate students 
and qualified seniors in chemical engineering. Prerequisites: Chem- 
ical Engineering 180, 183 and 184. 

Second semester. Professor Hodge. 

195. Thesis. (2 to 5 Hrs.) Primarily for seniors in chemical 
engineering and graduate students. Some problem in chemical engi- 
neering or industrial chemistry is selected for investigation. A care- 
fully prepared report is required. Credit is given in proportion to 
time put in and results obtained. 

First semester. Professor Hodge and Assistant Professor Koeh- 
ler. 

196. .Research Problems. (5 to 10 Hrs.) More advanced and 
extended work on research problems than can be given in Course 185. 
Credit in proportion to work done but as a general rule no student 
will be allowed to register for this course who cannot put in time 
equivalent to 8 hours credit per semester for two consecutive semes- 
ters. Prerequisites: Chemical Engineering 183 and 184. 

Either semester. Professor Hodge and Assistant Professor 
Koehler. 

197. Research Problems. A continuation. Second semester. 



226 West Virginia University 

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION. 

Professor Maclin. 

200. Vocational Guidance. (2 Hrs.) 

First semester; T., Th., 8:00; Professor Maclin, 16 W. 

201. Organization and Administration. (2 Hrs.) The organi- 
zation of vocational schools, classes and subject matter for the pur- 
pose of teaching. 

First semester; hours to be arranged; Professor Maclin. 

202. Methods of Teaching. (2 Hrs.) Some practice teaching. 
Prerequisite: Course 201. 

Second semester; hours to be arranged; Professor Maclin. 

203. Foreman Training. (2 Hrs.) An analysis of the job of 
foreman, organiatzion of foreman training classes; in industrial plants, 
the foreman as a teacher. 

Second semester; hours to be arranged; Professor Maclin. 

205. Part-Time Education. (2 or 3 Hrs.) Open to juniors and 
seniors and those holding a junior high school certificate. 

First semester; T., Th., 9:00; Professor Maclin, 16 W. 

210. Shopwork. (2 or 3 Hrs.) Summer shop practice out of 
residence required for the degree of B.S. in Industrial Education. This 
work to be along the line of the major or minor group. 

211. iShopwork. (2 or 3 Hrs.) Summer shop practice out of 
residence required for the degree of B.iS. in Industrial Education. This 
work to be along the line of the major or minor group. 

221 (121). Vocational Education. (2 Hrs.) Open to juniors, sen- 
iors and graduates. Graduate students will work out special problems 
under the direction of the instructor. This course is intended for su- 
perintendents, principals, and vocational teachers to acquaint them 
with influences which tend to broaden our educational activities, with 
federal and state aid, with the types of work suitable for different 
communities, and with the qualifications of teachers. 

First semester; T., Th., 10:00; Professor Maclin, 16 W. 



The College of Engineering 227 

VOCATIONAL COURSES OFFERED IN SUMMER SCHOOL. 

The following courses will be offered during the summer session: 
Organization and Administration of Manual Training, Trade Analysis 
and Methods of Teaching Trade and Related Subjects, and a course 
in Vocational Education. In the shops the following courses: Wood- 
working, Mechanical Drawing, Sheet Metal Work, Machine Shop Prac- 
tice and Farm Blaeksmithing. 

SHORT COURSE IN COAL MINING. 

The Short Course in Coal Mining offered by the Department of 
Mining Engineering gives an opportunity to operators, officials and 
employes of the mining companies to obtain instruction pertaining to 
their work. The subjects covered in the Short Course are: explosives, 
methods of working, timbering, mine gases, mine ventilation, hoisting, 
haulage, mine drainage, safety lamps, mine management, electricity 
in mines, mine fires and explosions, safety organization and adminis- 
tration, mining arithmetic, and elementary mechanical drawing. 

Special attention is given to students desirous of preparing them- 
selves for the teaching of mining classes under the Smith-Hughes Act. 

Through the co-operation of the West Virginia Department of 
Mines instruction in first aid and mine rescue work is given. 

At the close of the Short Course the Department of Mines of 
West Virginia will hold an examination for mine foremen and fire 
bosses. 

Tuition is free. It is believed that $60 should cover all necessary 
expenses for the six weeks, excluding traveling expenses. 

The thirteenth annual session of the Short Course in Coal Mining 
will begin on Monday, June 8, and continue until Saturday, July 8. 
1925. For further information write for the special announcement of 
the Short Course in Coal Mining. 

VOCATIONAL COURSES OFFERED IN EXTENSION. 
Industrial Education. 

The Department of Industrial Education will each year conduct 
in appropriate centers the courses offered in residence that may be of 
particular interest to the local teachers and those expecting to teach. 

Coal Mining. 

Extension courses in mining are offered under the direction of the 
University at various mining towns throughout the state. The in- 
struction in these courses is carried on by a University extension in- 
structor who visits each center every week. At the present time the 
work is planned on a two-year basis to cover the following unit 
courses: Mine Gases, Safety Lamps, Ventilation, Timbering, Explo- 
sives, Haulage, and Drainage and Pumping. In each of these unit 
courses particular emphasis is placed on safety features, state min- 
ing law and application of arithmetic. 



228 West Virginia University 

ENGINEERING EXPERIMENT STATION. 

On June .24, 1921, the Board of Education authorized the College 
of Engineering to organize and prepare for work along experimental 
lines leading to an Engineering Experiment Station, and named the 
Dean of the College of Engineering as director of said station when 
established. 

The purpose of the Station shall be to conduct original researches, 
investigations, experiments and tests bearing upon the varied 
branches of engineering, industries, industrial occupations and natu- 
ral resources of the State, including problems in agriculture common 
to both engineering and agriculture, and to make the results of such 
investigations available to the public by the publication of a series of 
bulletins. Incidentally, one of the important functions of the Station 
shall be to train men for research work and to encourage young men 
to pursue graduate studies. Particular attention will be given to the 
natural resources of the state, including coal, oil, gas, timber, clays, 
stone, sand, and gravel; investigations and experiments relating to 
the production, preparation, properties, manufacture, and transporta- 
tion of materials, water power, water supply, sewerage, sanitation, 
road building, transportation, manufacturing wastes, power, lighting, 
heating, refrigerating, and ventilation. 

The Station will co-operate with the departments of physics, 
chemistry and geology and with the Agricultural Experiment Station, 
the State Road Commission, the State Geological Survey, the State 
Department of Mines, the Sanitary Department of the State Board 
of Health and any other agency in the state carrying on research work 
along engineering lines or which may be in need of the assistance of 
research engineers or engineering advice in carrying on its investi- 
gations. 

The Director and heads of the departments of the College of 
Engineering compose the executive staff and are responsible for the 
establishment of the general policies governing the work of the Sta- 
tion, including material for publication. 



The College of 
Agriculture 



THE FACULTY. 

FRANK BUTLER TROTTER, A.M., LL.D., President of the Uni- 
versity 

GEORGE RICHARD LYMAN, Ph.D., Dean 

"LEONARD MARION PEAIRS, M.S., Professor of Entomology 

♦NAHUM JAMES GIDDINGS, Ph.D., Professor of Plant Pathology 

♦ERNEST LEE ANTHONY, M.S., Professor of Dairy Husbandry 

*EDWARD ALEXANDER LIVESAY, M.S., A.M., Professor of 
Animal Husbandry 

RACHEL HARTSHORN COLWELL, B.S., A.M., Professor of Home 
Economics 

*MAXWELL JAY DORSEY, Ph. D., Professor of Horticulture 

*RALPH JOHN GARBER, Ph.D., Professor of Agronomy 

♦ANDREW JACKSON DADISMAN, Ph.D., Professor of Farm 
Economics 

EDGAR LEWIS ANDREWS, M.S., Associate Professor of Poultry 
Husbandry 

♦HARRY EDWARD KNOWLTON, Ph.D., Associate Professor of 
Horticulture 

♦HARLEY LUCIUS CRANE, M.S.Agr., Associate Professor of 
Horticulture 

♦EUGENE PEYTON DEATRICK, Ph.D., Associate Professor of 
Soils 

♦HARRY ORAM HENDERSON, M.S., Associate Professor of Dairy 
Husbandry 

HOWARD BUSHNELL ALLEN, M.S., Associate Professor of Agri- 
cultural Education 

♦THEODORE EUGENE ODLAND, M.S., Associate Professor of 
Agronomy 

♦KYLE CHESTER WESTOVER, M.S.Agr., Assistant Professor of 
Horticulture 



230 West Virginia University 

ROY A. OLNEY, M.S., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Educa- 
tion 

*LEON H. LEONIAN, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Plant Pathology 

♦CHARLES VINYARD WILSON, M.S., Assistant Professor of Ani- 
mal Husbandry 

*ERWIN COVERDALE STILLWELL, M.S., Assistant Professor of 
Animal Husbandry 

NELL NESBITT, A.M., Assistant Professor of Home Economics 

JEAN ELNORA RICHMOND, A.M., Assistant Professor of Home 
Economics 

♦♦CHARLES HENRY HARTLEY, B.S., Instructor in Agricultural 

Extension 

♦♦♦CHARLES ELLSWORTH STOCKDALE, B.S.Agr., Instructor in 
Agricultural Journalism 

♦ERNEST ANGELO, B.S.Agr., Instructor in Horticulture 

ALICE MILNER TAYLOR, B.S.H.E., Instructor in Home Economics 

*FERRIS DEWEY CORNELL, Jr., M.S., Instructor in Farm 
Mechanics 

*KARL SPANGLER QUISENBERRY, B.S.Agr., Instructor in 
Agronomy 

ISABELLE LOWE COCHRANE, B.S., Instructor in Home Economics 

♦♦EDWARD LEE SHAW, B.S.Agr., Instructor in Animal Husbandry 

DICKSON WARD PARSONS, M.S., Instructor in Vocational Agri- 
culture 

♦♦♦WALTER W. ARMENTROUT, B.S.Agr., Instructor in Farm Eco- 



SARA ELIZABETH SLATER, B.S., Instructor in Home Economics 

*WARREN GIFFORD, B.S.Agr., Instructor in Dairy Husbandry 

♦TROY MANSELL CURRENCE, B.S.Agr., Instructor in Horticul- 
ture 

*GEORGE MALCOLM TROUT, M.S., Instructor in Dairy Husbandry 

♦SHERMAN SHAW WHEELER, M.S., Instructor in Animal Hus- 
bandry 

♦PAUL AXEL EKE, Ph.D., Instructor in Farm Economics 

HAZEL MARY GODDARD, B.S., Assistant in Home Economics 



The College of Agriculture 231 

HARRY NEIGHARD GRUBER, B.S.Agr., Field Instructor, U. S. 
Veterans' Bureau 

JOHN F. CAMPBELL, B.S., Field Instructor, U. S. Veteran's 
Bureau 

ARLO BOWLBY CARROLL, B.S.Agr., Instructor, U. S. Veterans' 
Bureau 

*BRYAN LEWELLYN WADE, B.S.Agr., Graduate Assistant in 
Agronomy 

♦FRANK WALDO CRAIG, B.S.Agr., Graduate Assistant in Ento- 
mology 

ERNEST THOMAS WIGHTMAN, B.S.Agr., Graduate Assistant in 
Poultry Husbandry 

♦LEWIS GLENN STARK, B.S.Agr., Graduate Assistant in Horticul- 
ture 

HICKMAN CHARLES MURPHY, Student Assistant in Agronomy 

GEORGE OSCAR MULLAN, Student Assistant in Poultry Hus- 
bandry 

JOSIAH WALLACE BAIRD, Jr., Student Assistant in Dairy Hus- 
bandry 

ALLEN McKINLEY ELLIOTT, Student Assistant in Dairy Hus- 
bandry 

JOHN CHARLES JOHNSTON, Secretary 



♦Member of Staffs of Instruction and Experiment Station. 

♦♦Member of staffs of Instruction and Extension. 

♦♦♦Member of staffs of Instruction, Experiment Station and Extension. 



232 West Virginia University 

WEST VIRGINIA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION 

STAFF. 

GEORGE RICHARD LYMAN, Ph.D., Dean of the College of Agri- 
culture 

HENRY GRANGER KNIGHT, Ph.D., Director and Chemist 

WILLIAM EARL RUMSEY,2 B.S.Agr., State Entomologist 

♦LEONARD MARION PEAIRS, M.S., Entomologist 

HORACE ATWOOD, M.S.Agr., Poultry Husbandman 

♦NAHUM JAMES GIDDINGS, Ph.D., Plant Pathologist 

♦ERNEST LEE ANTHONY, M.S., Dairy Husbandman 

♦EDWARD ALEXANDER LIVESAY, M.S., A.M., Animal Husband- 
man 

♦MAXWELL JAY DORSEY, Ph.D., Horticulturist 

♦RALPH JOHN GARBER, Ph.D., Agronomist 

♦ANDREW JACKSON DADISMAN, Ph.D., Farm Economist 

♦HARRY EDWARD KNOWLTON, Ph.D., Associate Horticulturist 

♦HARLEY LUCIUS CRANE, M.S.Agr., Associate Horticulturist 

♦EUGENE PEYTON DEATRICK, Ph.D., Associate Soil Technol- 
ogist 

♦HARRY ORAM HENDERSON, M.S., Associate Dairy Husbandman 

♦THEODORE EUGENE ODLAND, M.S., Associate Agronomist 

CHARLES EDWARD WEAKLEY, Jr., A.B., Assistant Chemist 

ANTHONY BERG, M.S., Assistant Plant Pathologist 

LUTHER FRANCIS SUTTON, 3 B.S.Agr., Assistant Horticulturist 

♦KYLE CHESTER WESTOVER, M.S.Agr., Assistant Horticulturist 

♦♦EVERETT CLIFTON SHERWOOD, M.S., Assistant Plant Pathol- 
ogist 

THEODORE CLINTON McILVAINE,* Ph.D., Assistant Agronomist 

THEODORIC BRYANT LEITH,* A.B., Assistant Chemist 

ROSS HOMAN TUCKWILLER,* B.S.Agr., Assistant Animal Hus- 
bandman 
♦LEON H. LEONIAN, Ph.D., Assistant Plant Pathologist 

♦CHARLES VINYARD WILSON, M.S., Assistant Animal Husband- 
man 



The College of Agriculture 233 

♦ERWIN COVERDALE STILLWELL, M.S., Assistant Animal Hus- 
bandman 

***CHARLES ELLSWORTH STOCKDALE, B.S.Agr., Agricultural 
Editor 

♦ERNEST ANGELO, B.S.Agr., Junior Horticulturist 

♦FERRIS DEWEY CORNELL, Jr., M.S., Junior Farm Engineer 

♦KARL SPANGLER QUISENBERRY, B.S.Agr., Junior Agronomist 

THOMAS JOSEPH COCHRANE, B.S., Junior Chemist 

♦♦♦WALTER W. ARMENTROUT, B.S.Agr., Junior Farm Econo- 
mist 

♦WARREN GIFFORD, B.S.Agr., Junior Dairy Husbandman 

♦TROY MANSELL CURRENCE, B.S.Agr., Junior Horticulturist 

♦GEORGE MALCOLM TROUT, M.S., Junior Dairy Husbandman 

♦SHERMAN SHAW WHEELER, M.S., Junior Animal Husbandman 

♦PAUL AXEL EKE, Ph.D., Junior Farm Economist 

JOHN CHARLES JOHNSTON, Chief Clerk 



Hn co-operation with the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

2ln co-operation with the State Department of Agriculture. 

3ln charge of Reymann Memorial Farms. 

4lrt Charge of sub-station at Maggie, W. Va. 

♦Member of staffs of Instruction and Experiment Station. 

**Member of staffs of Experiment Station and Extension. 

***Member of staffs of Instruction, Experiment Station and Extension. 



234 West Virginia University 

WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION 

STAFF. 

GEORGE RICHARD LYMAN, Ph.D., Dean of the College of Agri- 
culture 

NAT TERRY FRAME, A.B., Director 

WILLIAM HENRY KENDRICK, B.S., Assistant Director in Charge 
of Four-H Club Work 

CHARLES HENRY HARTLEY, B.S., Assistant Director in Charge 
of Supplementary Instruction 

HAZEL MARION HORSFALL, B.S., State Four-H Club Agent 

***CHARLES ELLSWORTH STOCKDALE, B.S.Agr., Agricul- 
tural Editor 

*EDWARD LEE SHAW, B.S.Agr., Sheep Specialist 

DEE CRANE, Potato Specialist 

DAVID ROLLIN DODD, B.S.Agr., Agronomy Specialist 

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN CREECH, B.S.Agr., Beef Cattle and Hogs 
Specialist 

HUGH WILLARD PRETTYMAN, B.S.Agr., Superintendent of the 
Packing School 

THOMAS DAVIS GRAY, B.S., Horticultural Specialist 

MARY CATHRYN MORELAND, B.S.Agr., Home Industries Spec- 
ialist 

**EVERETT CLIFTON SHERWOOD, M.S., Plant Disease Specialist 

AARON HAROLD RAPKING, B.D., Specialist in Rural Organiza- 
tion 

JAMES VINCENT HOPKINS, B.S.Agr., Dairy Specialist 

***WALTER W. ARMENTROUT, B.S.Agr., Marketing Specialist 

ORVILLE DEWEY WHITE, B.S.Agr., Poultry Specialist 

GEORGE JAY VAN DERVEER, B.S., Assistant Poultry Specialist 

JEANNETTE WEIL, Chief Clerk in Charge of Clerks and Stenogra- 
phers 



♦Member of staffs of Instruction and Extension. 

** Member of staffs of Experiment Station and Extension. 

** ♦Member of staffs of Instruction, Experiment Station and Extension. 



The College of Agriculture 235 

FACULTY COMMITTEES. 

Agricultural Students' Courses and Hours: Dean LYMAN, Pro- 
fessors PEAIRS, GIDDINGS and ANTHONY. 

Home Economics Students' Courses and Hours: Dean LYMAN, 
Professor COLWELL and Assistant Professor RICHMOND. 

Farm Operations: Professors DADISMAN, ANTHONY and GAR- 
BER, Associate Professors ANDREWS and KNOWLTON and 

Assistant Professor WILSON. 



236 West Virginia University 

ORGANIZATION. 

AH the agricultural and home economics work of the University 
is organized under the College of Agriculture. For the purposes of 
administration the college is divided into four branches, viz: 

I. The Agricultural Experiment Station, organized for research 
and experimental work. 

II. Resident instruction in agriculture. 

III. Resident instruction in home economics. 

IV. Extension work for all citizens of the State who desire in- 
struction in agriculture and home economics while living on the 
farm. This work is given iby the Division of Agricultural Extension. 

The primary divisions of the work of the College of Agriculture 
should be clearly distinguished. Some of its staff are engaged in 
college instruction, experiment station research and extension teach- 
ing; some give their entire time to instruction; a few give their en- 
tire time to experiment station work and several are engaged en- 
tirely in extension work. 

THE WEST VIRGINIA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT 
STATION. 

The Experiment Station was established by the Board of Regents 
in 1887, by authority of an act of Congress known as the Hatch Act. 
Further 'support was given by an act of Congress known as the 
Adams Act, approved June 30, 1906. From the appropriations made 
by Congress under these acts the Station derives an annual income 
of thirty thousand dollars. Section 2 of the Hatch Act fully states 
the object and purpose of the Experiment Station as follows: 

"That it shall be the object and duty of the said Experiment 
Station to conduct original researches or verify experiments on the 
physiology of plants and animals; the diseases to which they are 
severally subject with the remedies for the same; the chemical com- 
position of useful plants at their different stages of growth; the 
comparative advantages of rotative cropping as pursued under vary- 
ing series of crops; the capacity of new plants or trees for accli- 
mation; the analysis of soils and water; the chemical composition 
of manures, natural or artificial, with experiments designed to test 
their comparative effects on crops of different kinds; the adaptation 
and value of grasses and forage plants; the composition and di- 
gestibility of the different kinds of foods for domestic animals; the 
scientific and economic questions involved in the production of butter 



The College of Agriculture 237 

and cheese; and such other researches and experiments bearing di- 
rectly on the agricultural industry of the United States as may in 
each case be deemed advisable, having due regard to the varying 
conditions and needs of the respective states and territories." 

The State Legislature makes appropriations for the same pur- 
poses. During the present biennial period these appropriations 
amounted to seventy thousand dollars a year. 

At present, investigations are being conducted in the fields 
of animal husbandry, dairy husbandry, poultry husbandry, field crops, 
horticulture, entomology, plant pathology, agricultural chemistry, 
soils, rural economics, farm engineering and veterinary science, 
which are classified into sixty-six research projects. For the purpose 
of carrying out the work of the Experiment Station certain labora- 
tory spaces in the College of Agriculture are set aside, and five farms 
in the neighborhood of Morgantown belonging to West Virginia Uni- 
versity are used for field laboratories. Further investigations are 
carried on at Morgantown, and at other points in the State, in co- 
operation with the United States Department of Agriculture, and 
with private individuals. At Maggie, the State Board of Control has 
leased certain lands to the Experiment Station upon which investiga- 
tions upon tobaccco and other crops are being conducted in co-opera- 
tion with the Bureau of Plant Industry of the U. S. Department of 
Agriculture; at Lewisburg for the past several years cattle-feeding 
investigations have been carried on under a joint agreement between 
the Bureau of Animal Industry, U. S. Department of Agriculture, 
and the Tuckwiller brothers of that place; upon the Reymann Me- 
morial Experiment Farms at Wardensville, some in- and out-breeding 
investigations are being conducted with Ayreshire cattle in co-opera- 
tion with the Dairy Division of the U. S. Department of Agriculture; 
and at other points in the state investigations along several lines are 
being conducted with private individuals with excellent results. 

Bulletins and annual reports setting forth results of experiments 
and investigations Conducted at the Station are published for gratu- 
itous distribution, and will be mailed to any citizen of the state ap- 
plying for them. 

The Experiment Station is engaged solely in research and in- 
vestigation, the results of which, with those of similar institutions, 
are used as the basis of teaching in the College of Agriculture, in- 
cluding the work of the Extension Division. 

For further information concerning the work of the Experiment 
Station write the Director. 



238 West Virginia University 

REYMANN MEMORIAL EXPERIMENT FARMS. 

Through the (gift of Anton Reymann and Paul 0. Reymann of 
Wheeling, West Virginia, executors of the estate of Lawrence A. 
Reymann, deceased, the University came into possession on March 
1, 1917, of the Lawrence A. Reymann Memorial Experiment Farms, 
including 930 acres of land on the Capon River in Hardy County, and 
a herd of 94 head of pure bred Ayreshire cattle. The farms are for the 
use of the Experiment Station for experimental work in all phases 
of agricultural science. Under co-operative agreements drawn up 
with the Bureau of Animal Industry, United States Department of 
Agriculture, the farms will be used primarily for dairy breeding 
investigations. Studies will be made of the comparative value of in- 
and out-breeding, using tested sires. As this is the best equipped 
establishment of its kind in the United States and probably in the 
world, the progress of the work will be watched with interest by live- 
stock men and the results should do much toward answering some 
very important questions. Other investigations will also be conducted 
upon these farms as rapidly as funds will permit. 

During the past three years, a modern dairy barn has been built, 
with standard equipment ,and during the past year a creamery, 
fully equipped with modern machinery including a refrigerating 
plant. As no investigations are being carried on with dairy products, 
the milk is converted into whatever product finds the most ready 
market. Since the winter of 1922-23 sweet cream has been 
placed daily on the Washington City market. Prior to that time the 
milk was converted into full cream cheese. 



The College of Agriculture 239 

INSTRUCTION IN AGRICULTURE. 

AIM AND SCOPE. 

The training given by the College of Agriculture is designed 
to fit its students for farm life, or for work as teachers, county 
agents and other field workers, or investigators of agricultural sub- 
jects. A large part of the course consists of technical work in the 
various branches of agriculture. The aim in these courses is to make 
plain the principles underlying agricultural science, and also to give 
as much practice work as facilities will permit, so that the student 
will receive a training fitting him for efficient work. The curriculum 
is planned to give the student a general knowledge of all phases of 
agriculture, but at the same time to afford him an opportunity to 
to specialize in the subjects in which he is particularly interested. A 
thorough training in the general sciences underlying scientific agri- 
culture is given. 

EQUIPMENT. 

The administrative offices and many of the laboratory and class 
rooms of the College of Agriculture are in Oglebay Hall. This 
building, which is 188 feet long and four stories high, contains on the 
basement floor the creamery and dairy laboratories, a four-chambered 
cold storage plant and ice machine, the station mailing room and 
laboratories for horticulture, animal husbandry and agronomy. The 
first floor is devoted to offices and reading rooms, agronomy and horti- 
culture laboratories, and. the food and textile laboratories of the home 
economics department. The second floor houses the Extension Divis- 
ion and provides six recitation rooms and three home economics lab- 
oratories. On the upper floor are the departments of botany, plant 
pathology, entomology, farm economics, veterinary science and agri- 
cultural education. 

The College of Agriculture now has 700 acres of land lying at a 
short distance from the university buildings. This land has been 
definitely organized into a series of five farms operated respectively 
by the animal hubandry, dairy husbandry, poultry husbandry, agron- 
omy, and horticulture departments. 

There are a barn and judging pavilion on the lower campus, and 
horse, beefoattle, and hog barns on the animal husbandry farm. The 
barn on the agronomy farm has been remodeled, and on the poultry 
farm a three-story building has been constructed for feed storage, 
incubation and brooding, together with several other small colony 
and brooding houses. 

A new dairy barn of imposing type and modern construction has 
been built on the dairy farm. This is one of the best dairy barns in 



240 West Virginia University 

the state, and has all modern conveniences and equipment for class 
use. 

The greenhouse establishment has been greatly enlarged and 
made modern in all respects. 

With Oglebay Hall, the old experiment station building, the old 
horticultural hall, the barns and live stock hall, and the greenhouses, 
hot beds and cold frames, equipment is available for a thorough and 
complete training in the science and art of farming. Laboratories 
are provided for all phases of dairy husbandry, animal husbndry, 
poultry husbandry, veterinary science, agronomy, horticulture, ento- 
mology, plant pathology, farm management and agricultural educa- 
tion, and the greenhouses, farms, and barns afford facilities for 
practical work in which the principles taught in the classroom and 
laboratory may be tested and put into practice. 

DEMONSTRATION FRUIT GRADING AND PACKING PLANT. 

The State Legislature of 1919 provided funds with which to con- 
struct a demonstration fruit grading and packing plant to be oper- 
ated by the College of Agriculture. The plant is located at Inwood, 
in 'Berkeley County, in the heart of the territory commonly known 
as "Apple Pie Ridge," in which apples are grown in great variety and 
in large quantities, and many other fruits are produced. The plant 
is operated from early July until the late fall. 



The College of Agriculture 



241 



ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS. 

For admission to the College of Agriculture the student must 
have credit for fifteen units of secondary school work, i. e., the work 
of a standard four-year high school. 

A. The following groups are required: 

(1) Three or four units of English. 4 

(2) Two units of mathematics (one of algebra and one of 
plane geometry. 

(3) Three units in a third subject. 

(4) Two units in a fourth subject. 

(5) Four units elective. 

B. Work in the following subjects not to exceed the number of 
units placed after each subject will be accepted. 



English 


4 units 


Foreign languages 1 




Latin 


4 units 


Greek 


3 units 


French 


3 units 


German 


3 units 


Spanish 


2 units 


Italian 


2 units 


Mathematics 




Algebra 


2 units 


Plane geometry 


1 unit 


Solid geometry 


V2 unit 


Trigonometry 


V2 unit 


History and economics 




History 


3 units 


Civics 


1 unit 


Elementary economics 


; 1 unit 


Sociology 


% unit 


Education 


2 units 


Drawing 




Free-hand drawing 


1 unit 


Mechanical draw- 




ing 


1 unit 


Science 2 





Physics 
Chemistry 
Biology 
Botany 
Geology 
Zoology 

General science 
Physical geography 
Physiology 

Hygiene and sanitation 
Commercial geography 
Commercial law 
Vocational subjects (not 
ceed four units in all.) 
Agriculture 
Household arts 
Manual training 
Bookkeeping or book- 
keeping and commercial 
arithmetic combined 
Shorthand and type- 
writing combined 
Music: — violin, organ or 
piano 3 



1 unit 

1 unit 

1 unit 

1 unit 

1 unit 

1 unit 

1 unit 

M> unit 

V2 unit 

% unit 

V2 unit 

V2 unit 

to ex- 

3 units 
3 units 
3 units 



2 units 
2 units 
2 units 



lA single unit of foreign language will not be accepted unless the student takes 
as a part of the elective work toward his degree at least six semester hours of college 
work in that language. 

2A group of two or three units in science may be made by combining one unit 
each of physics, chemistry, biology, botany, zoology, geology. 

3For conditions governing credit for music see Announcements of the School of 
Music. 

4Students presenting three units in English must take six hours of college 
English in addition to what is otherwise required for the degree. 



242 West Virginia University 

DEGREES. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF 
SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURE. 

Credits Required. 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture may be con- 
ferred upon any student who satisfies the entrance requirements, and 
offers one hundred and forty-four semester hours credit for college 
courses, including all requirements set forth below. 

The "semester hour" is the standard for computing the amount 
of work required 1 for /graduation. The "hour" represents the amount 
of work done in one semester (eighteen weeks) in one recitation 
hour with two preparation hours a week, or in three hours' practice 
or laboratory work requiring no outside preparation. No student is 
permitted to register for less than fifteen hours or more than twenty 
hours of work in any one semester without special permission. 

Classification of Students. 

To be classified as a conditioned freshman in the College of Ag- 
riculture a student must have credit for at least fifteen units of 
entrance requirements; to be classified as a regular freshman he 
must have fulfilled all entrance requirements. To be classified as a 
sophomore he must have credit for 26 hours of college work; as a 
junior, 64 hours; and as a senior, 100 hours. 

Summer Courses. 

Students may complete the prescribed course for the degree of 
[Bachelor of Science in Agriculture by taking full work for two sum- 
mer sessions (12 hours each) and three academic years, but only stu- 
dents of exceptional ability or mature age should undertake such a 
curriculum, which should be, arranged with the dean in advance. 

Admission With Advanced Standing. 

Students from other institutions will be given credit for work 
already done in accordance with the general rules for advanced stand- 
ing (see university catalogue), but at least one year of work in resi- 
dence, not less than thirty hours of which must be in the College of 
Agriculture, will be required for the baccalaureate degree in agricul- 
ture. 

Required and Elective Subjects. 

Of the one hundred and forty-four hours required for the degree, 
eighty-eight are prescribed for all students, as indicated in the cur- 



The College of Agriculture 243 

rieulum on the following page. Students who are not required to 
take military science must substitute elective credits. The remain- 
ing fifty-six hours' credit must be elected from such courses as may be 
approved by the class officer. Of these not less than ten hours nor 
more than thirty hours shall be elected from other colleges. The re- 
mainder must be elected from the College of Agriculture. 

Under no circumstances will a degree in agriculture be granted 
unless the student has completed a total of sixty credit hours in agri- 
cultural courses. 

Class Officer. 

The dean of the College of Agriculture will act as class officer 
for all students in agriculture. The head of the department in which 
the student elects to take his major work will be his advisor for the 
junior and senior years. 

Special Students. 

Attention is directed to the fact that persons of maturity who 
have had approximately two years of high school work may enter the 
College of Agriculture as special students under the provisions set 
forth in the university catalogue. These students will be admitted 
to all elementary classes in agriculture and will receive a thorough 
training in the practical phases of scientific agriculture. Special pro- 
vision is made for disabled soldiers and those taking strictly voca- 
tional courses. 

Under-Graduate Curriculum. 

Most of the courses provided for freshmen and sophomores, and 
a portion of those for juniors, are definitely required as set forth in 
the following outline of courses. These requirements will be modi- 
fied only 1 in exceptional cases where students who enter with advanced 
standing or who have other irregularities in their schedule cannot 
follow the usual curriculum on account of conflicts. In such cases 
students will be permitted to offer other courses deemed satisfactory 
to the Committee on Students' Courses and Hours. 



244 West Virginia University 

Courses Required of All Students in Agriculture. 1 

Lectures Lab. Hours 
Periods Credit 

Freshman Year — First Semester. 

Agricultural botany ('Botany 1) 2 2 4 

Rhetoric and composition (English 1) 3 3 

Inorganic chemistry (Chemistry 1) 3 2 4 

Farm dairying (Dairy Husb. 1) 2 13 

Introductory animal husib. (An. Husb. 1) 3 14 

Introduction to agriculture (Agrie. 1) 1 1 

Military science (1) 1 20 

Freshman Year — Second Semester. 

Agricultural botany (Botany 2) 2 2 4 

Rhetoric and composition (English 2) 3 3 

Inorganic chemistry (Chemistry 2) 3 2 4 

Vegetable gardening (Horticulture 30) 2 1 3 

Farm poultry (IPoultry 2) 2 13 

Military science (2) 1 18 

Sophomore Year — First Semester. 

Organic chemistry (Chemistry 31 ) 2 3 1 4 

English literature (English 3) 2 2 

General bacteriology (Botany 41) 2 13 

Elementary pomology (Horticulture 1) 213 

Farm crops (Agronomy 1) 3 14 

Military science (3) 1 17* 

Sophomore Year — Second Semester. 

Agricultural zoology (Zoology 4) 3 3 2 5 

English literature (English 4) 2 2 

Rural economics (Farm Econ. 2) 4 4 

General entomology (Entomology 2) 3 14 

Military science (4) 1 16 4 

Junior Year — First Semester. 

Physics (1) 3 3 

Physics (3) 1 1 

Geology (2) 3 3 

Geology (21) 1 18 

Junior Year — (Second Semester. 

Physics (2) 3 3 

Physics (4) 1 1 

Properties of soils (Soils 1) 2 1 3 7 

lln addition to the courses llisted above two hours credit in Farm Practice (Ag- 
riculture 5) must be earned before senior year, preferably in the summer between 
6ophomore and junior years. 

2 Chemistry 33 may be substitute d. 

3Zooik>gy 1 and 2 may be substituted. 

■^Mathematics 18 and Chemistry are suggested as electives to fill out the sopho- 
more schedule. 



The College of Agriculture 245 

Choice of Electives 

Upon registering at the beginning of the junior year, each student 
who wishes to do special work in any department will be referred hy 
the dean to the head of that department as his advisor. The question 
as to whether a given student shall concentrate in a certain depart- 
ment or shall pursue a broader course in general' agriculture is a 
matter to which that student should give very careful consideration. 
The decision should be based upon the student's plans after gradua- 
tion and he should endeavor to shape his college course so as to secure 
the most efficient preparation possible for the vocation he expects to 
follow. 

Many graduates of the College of Agriculture engage in second- 
ary school teaching. The undergraduate curriculum in such cases 
should include a broad training in all branches of agriculture together 
with special courses in education as outlined below. Those aspiring 
to positions as county agents or extension workers should also secure 
a broad rather than a narrow training together with certain special 
courses designed to give preparation for that field of work. Students 
wishing to engage in some special line of agricultural work should 
concentrate in that field but those looking forward to a life on a 
typical West Virginia general farm will find a general agricultural 
curriculum most helpful. Those who have decided on a life of re- 
search or of university teaching, should build a broad agricultural 
foundation including considerable knowledge of the fundamental 
sciences and a reading knowledge of French and German, before spec- 
ialization is attempted in any particular field. 

All students should include among their electives certain liberaliz- 
ing courses which will train them for citizenship and help to qualify 
them for leadership in their respective communities. A suggestive 
list from which such courses may be chosen is given below. 

STATE TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES 

Certification to teach in West Virginia schools is offered by the 
state department of schools to those graduates who meet the require- 
ments set up by the state board of education. Graduates desiring to 
teach both vocational agriculture and related academic courses will be 
obliged to obtain either a provisional or a regular high school teach- 
er's certificate as well as the approval of the state supervisor of 
vocational agriculture. Applicants for regular high school teachers' 
certificates must offer credit for twenty hours of "education" courses. 
Endorsement by the Department of Education in the College of Arts 
and Sciences is further limited as shown on page 49 of the University 
catalogue. Applicants for provisional certificates, subject to condi- 
tional annual renewal, must offer credit for at least six hours of ed- 



246 West Virginia University 

ucation courses. Applicants for permanent approval to teach vo- 
cational agriculture granted 'by the State Supervisor must offer credit 
for twelve specified hours in education courses as explained below. 
Applicants for special certificates to teach agriculture only or voca- 
tional agriculture conditionally must offer credit for at least ten hours 
of education courses. 

The following courses in education are suggested for attainment 
of qualification for each of the above certificates. 

1. For the regular high school teacher's certificate with voca- 
tional agriculture teaching as chief objectice (20 hours credit), — Edu- 
cation 25; 34 or 19; 63 or 64; 32 or 30 or 13; Agricultural Educa- 
tion 2, 8, 11, 13 and 31. 

2. For approval to teach vocational agriculture (12 hours 
credit), — Education 25, 34 or 19; Agricultural Education 2, 8, 11 and 
13. 

3. For the special teacher's certificate (10 hours credit), — Edu- 
cation 25, 34 or 19; Agricultural Education 8 and 11. 

4. For the provisional teacher's certificate (6 hours credit), — 
Education 25; Agricultural Education 11. 



The College of Agriculture 247 

SUGGESTIVE LIST OF ELECTIVES OF CULTURAL 
OR GENERAL VALUE 

Subject. Hours. 

Principles of Economics (1 and 2) 3 each 

Money, Credit and Banking (Econ. 11) 3 

Public Finance (Econ. 12) 4 

Transportation (Econ. 41) 3 

Economic Development of the United States 

(Econ. 6) 3 

Natural Resources of the United States (Econ. 13) 2 

Commercial Geography (Econ. 5) 3 

Marketing Methods (Econ. 21) 3 

Business Law (Econ. 41 and 42) 3 each 

Elements of Sociology (Soc. 1) 3 

Rural Sociology (Soc. 4) 3 

Expository Writing (Eng. 13 and 14) 2 each 

Description and Narration (Eng. 11 and 12) 3 each 

Composition and Rhetoric (Eng. 8) 2 

American Literature (Eng. 65) 3 

Elementary French (1 and 2) 5 each 

Historical Geology (3) 3 

Geology of West Virginia (8) 2 

Elementary German (1 and 2) 5 each 

English Social and Industrial History (29) 3 

American Social and Economic History (49) 3 

History of West Virginia (50) 1 

Introduction of American Federal Government 

(Pol. S. 5) 3 

Mathematics for Agriculture and General Science 

(18) 3 

Introduction to Psychology (1) 3 

Logic (Philosophy 6) 3 

Ethics (Philosophy 11) 3 

Photography (Physics 16) 2 

Public Speaking (1) 2 

Effective Speaking (Pub. Sp. 11) 3 

Elementary Spanish (1 and 2) 5 each 

Principles of Biology (Zool. 10) 3 

Economic Zoology (Zool. 16) 2 

Limnology (Zool. 25) 2 

Woodworking (Eng'g. 3) 2 to 3 

Forging: (Eng'g. 7) 1 

Shop Work (Eng'g. 9) 2 

Mechanical Drawing (Eng'g. 23) 2 



REQUIREMENTS FOR CANDIDATES FOR B.S.AGR. DEGREE 
WHO ALREADY HOLD THE DEGREE A.B. OR B.S. 

Students who have received the degree of Bachelor of Arts or 
Bachelor of Science from West Virginia University or any institution 
of similar standing, may receive a degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Agriculture upon the following conditions: 



248 West Virginia University 

(1) The completion of Physics 1, 2, 3, 4, Chemistry 1, 2, 31, 
Botany 1, 2, 41, Zoology 4, and Geology 2, 21, or equivalent courses. 

(2) The completion of the thirty-one hours of required courses 
in the College of Agriculture curriculum. 

(3) The completion of at least twenty-nine hours of elective 
courses in the College of Agriculture. 

AGRICULTURAL COURSES WHICH MAY BE ELECTED BY 
STUDENTS IN THE COLLEGE OF ARTS 

AND SCIENCES 

Fifteen hours from the following courses may be credited toward 
the A. B. degree in the College of Arts and Sciences. (See University 
catalogue.) 

Subject. Hours. 

Agricultural Education 2 (Problems of Rural 

Education) 2 

Agricultural Education 15 (Methods of Visual 

Instruction) 2 

Agricultural Education 31 (Rural Organization) 3 

Agronomy 1 (Farm Crops) 4 

Agronomy 16 (Breeding of Field Crops) 3 

Animal Husbandry 1 (Introductory Animal Hus- 
bandry) 4 

Animal Husbandry 11 (Animal Nutrition) 2 

Animal Husbandry 12 (Feeding Farm Animals).... 3 
Animal Husbandry 22 (Breeding Farm Animals) 2 

Dairy Husbandry 1 (Farm Dairying) 3 

Entomology 30 and 31 (Apiculture) 2 and 1 

Farm Economics 3 (Farm Management) 3 

Horticulture 1 (Elementary Pomology) 3 

Horticulture 30 (Elementary Vegetable Gardening) 3 

Horticulture 53 (Crop Breeding) 3 

Poultry 2 (Farm Poultry) 3 

Soils 1 (Properties of Soils) 3 

The following courses are regular elective® both in the College 
of Agriculture and in the College of Arts and Sciences: 

Subject.- Hours. 
Agricultural Education 20 (Methods of Agricul- 
tural Extension) 2 

Agricultural Journalism 1 (Agricultural Jour- 
nalism) 2 • 

Dairy Husbandry 36 (Dairy Chemistry) 2 

Entomology (ATI courses except Apiculture) 
Genetics (All courses) 
Plant Pathology (All courses) 
Students who desire the advantage of the broader training se- 
cured by first taking a degree in the College of Arts and Sciences, 
and who then expect to take the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Agriculture, may so arrange their curriculum as to enable them to 
take a sufficient number of the elective courses mentioned above to 
secure the degree in agriculture in one year, or in one year and 
a summer school session, after receiving the first degree. 



The College of Agriculture 249 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Only the technical courses offered primarily for the students in 
agriculture are described here. For detailed description of the other 
courses listed as required or elective in the agricultural curriculum, 
see the announcement of courses in the College of Arts and Sciences 
or in other colleges. 

Admission to any advanced elective course is conditional upon 
the consent of the instructor. 

Courses marked by an asterisk (*) may be offered for credit in 
the College of Arts and Sciences. Courses marked by a double- 
asterisk (**) are regular electives in the College of Arts and Sciences. 
Courses bearing numbers from 1 to 100 are for under-graduates; 
those bearing numbers from 101 to 199 are for graduates, those with 
both numbers are open to both graduates and undergraduates. 

Course descriptions in a college catalogue rarely convey more 
definite information as to the content of the course than might be in- 
ferred from the title. For this reason all such descriptive matter has 
been omitted from these announcements of courses. Detailed infor- 
mation as to the extent and subject matter of any course will, how- 
ever, be furnished on request to the dean of the college. 

Following the announcement of courses offered by each depart- 
ment of instruction is given a list of electives recommended to 
students who are specializing in that department. 

AGRICULTURE 

Dean Lyman 

1. Introduction to Agriculture. (1 Hr.) Required of all fresh- 
men. Other students not admitted for credit. 
First semester; T., 9:00. 

5. Farm Practice. (2 Hrs.) A minimum of twelve weeks' 
work in summer on an approved farm or agricultural enterprise is 
required of all candidates for the degree of B.S.Agr. This work 
must be done between the freshman and senior years, and preferably 
between sophomore and junior years, under direction of the dean and 
the committee on farm operations. 



250 West Virginia University 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION.* 

Associate Professor Allen, Assistant Professor Olney and Messrs. 
Parsons and Hartley. 

The courses in this department are provided for under the Fed- 
eral Vocational Education Act. They are open only to a limited 
number of students besides those who are following: the prescribed 
courses to become teachers of vocational agriculture. Therefore 
students should arrange with the department before registering. 

Courses No. 13, 22, 3.1, 61 and 62 may be done in extension. 

2.* Problems of Rural Education. (2 Hrs.) Primarily for 
sophomores who are deciding upon their major interest among the 
agricultural occupations. An introduction to the problems of rural 
life betterment through education. (40). 

Second semester; T., Th., 11:00; Associate Professor Allen. 

8. (108) Principles of Vocational Teaching. (3 Hrs.) The 
development of principles underlying instruction in agricultural 
occupations. Should precede or accompany course 11. Primarily 
for juniors. 

Second semester; M., W., F., 9:00; Associate Professor Allen. 

11. (Ill) Special Methods in Teaching Vocational Agriculture. 
(3 Hrs.) Required of students preparing to teach vocational agri- 
culture in secondary schools. (36.) 

First semester for seniors; T., Th., 8:00; third hour to be ar- 
ranged; Assistant Professor Olney. 

Second semester for juniors; T., Th., 9:00; third hour to be 
arranged; Assistant Professor Olney. 

13. (113) Directed Teaching. (2 to 5 Hrs.) Required of all 
prospective teachers of vocational agriculture in order to qualify for 
certificate on graduation. Prerequisite; Agricultural Education 11. 
(3'7) 

Either semester; T., Th., 10:00; Assistant Professor Olney. 

15* (115). Methods and Materials of Visual Instruction. (2 
Hrs.) Practice in the preparation and use of illustrative materials 
and devices used in teaching vocational agriculture. (Offered in 
alternate years, beginning 1926-27.) 

First semester; T., Th., 9:00; Mr. Parsons. 



lElectives recommended for students whose major is agricultural education : 
Agricultural Journalism 1 Farm Mechanics 51, 52 

Agronomy 10 Horticulture 12 

Animal Husbandry 60, 62, 64 Plant Pathology 3 

Dairy Husbandry 12 Poultry 6 

Entomology 4 Soils 2 . 

Farm Economics 3 Veterinary Science 1, 2 

Students who contemplate teaching should elect a diversity of technical agri- 
cultural courses, thus fitting themselves for a wider range of openings in the field 
of secondary teaching. 



The College^ of Agriculture 251 

20.** Methods of Agricultural Extension. (2 Hrs.) A study 
of the job of the county agent and the agricultural extension pro- 
gram of West Virginia. (35). 

Second semester; T., Th., 11:00; Mr. Hartley. 

31* (131) Rural Organization. (3 Hrs.) A study of the social 
and economic factors affecting rural life. Directed observation and 
participation in rural social programs. For seniors. (50). 

First semester; M., W., F., 11:00; Associate Professor Allen. 

61, 62. Special Problems. (1 to 3 Hrs. per semester.) Open to 
seniors. (34). 

First and second semesters; hours to be arranged; staff. 

181, 182, 183, 184. Research. (1 to 5 Hrs. per semester.) Pre- 
requisites: Courses 8, 31, and 11 or 20. (34). 

First and second semesters; hours to be arranged; staff. 

AGRICULTURAL JOURNALISM. 

Mr. Stockdale. 

1.** Agricultural Journalism. (2 Hrs.) Instruction and prac- 
tice in preparing articles on agricultural subjects. Prerequisite; 
English 1 and 2 or consent of instructor. (12). 

First semester; M., F., 10:00. 

5, 6. Agricultural Journalism. (1 Hr. per semester.) A prac- 
tice course for juniors and seniors in connection with the publication 
of the West Virginia Agriculturist. Prerequisite: Agrcultural 
Journalism 1 or consent of instructor. (13). 

First and second semesters; hours to be arranged. 



25 2 West Virginia University 

AGRONOMY.* 

Professor Garber, Associate Professor Odland and Mr. Quisen- 

BERRY. 

1.* Farm Crops. (4 Hrs.) A general introductory course with 
emphasis on the practical aspects of production. Required of sopho- 
mores. (2). 

First Semester; M., W., F., 9:00 and one laboratory period; T., 
or W., 2:00-5:00; Mr. Quisenberry. 

5. Weeds and Seed Testing. (2 Hrs.) (9). 
First semester; two laboratory periods, M., F., 2:00-5:00; Asso- 
ciate Professor Odland and Mr. Quisenberry. 

10. Forage 'Crops. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisite: Agronomy 1. 
Second semester; M., F., 10:00; and one laboratory period, W., 
2:00-5:00; Associate Professor Odland and Mr. Quisenberry. 

13. Corn and Grain Judging. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisite: Agronomy 
1. .(3) 

First semester; hours to be arranged; Associate Professor 
Odland. 

16.* (116) Breeding of Field Crops. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisites: 
Agronomy 1 and Genetics 21. (15). 

Second semester; T., Th., 9:00; and Th., 2:00-5:00; Professor 
Garber. 

17, 18, 19, 20, (117, 118, 119, 120) Special Topics. (1 to 3 Hrs. 

per semester.) Assigned literature and problems, with discussions. 
A student may elect elementary 'biometry, experimental field technie, 
a phase of crop production or a phase of crop breeding. Prerequi- 
site: Consent of instructor. (14). 

First and second semesters; hours to be arranged; Professor 
Garber and Associate Professor Odland. 

181, 182, 183, 184. Research in Farm Crops. (1 to 5 Hrs. per 
semester.) (12). 

First and second semesters; hours to be arranged; Professor 
Garber and Associate Professor Odland. 



lStudents specializing in Agronomy should elect a broad range of subjects in 
agriculture, including courses in both pliant industry and animal husbandry. The 
courses mentioned below are closely related to Agronomy. 
Botany 5, 21, 31 Plant Pathology 3 

Farm Mechanics 51 Soils 2 

Genetics 21 



The College of Agriculture 253 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY.! 

Professor Livesay, Assistant Professors Wilson and Stillwell, 
Mr. Wheeler and Mr. Shaw. 

1.* Introductory Animal Husbandry. (4 Hrs.) Required of 
freshmen. Study of breeds, types and market classes of farm ani- 
mals and their care and feeding. This course is prerequisite to all 
other courses in the department. (40). 

First semester; M., W., F., 9:00; and Th., 2:00-5:00; Assistant 
Professors Wilson and Stillwell, and Mr. Wheeler. 

11.* (Ill) Animal Nutrition. (2 Hrs.) Composition of feeds 
and the metabolism of food nutrients. Open to juniors and seniors. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 31. (45). 

First semester; M., 2:00-6:00; Professor Livesay. 

12.* Feeding Farm Animals. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisite: Animal 
Husbandry 11. (42). 

Second semester; M., W., F., 11:00; Assistant Professor Wilson 
and Mr. Wheeler. 

22.* (122) Breeding Farm Animals. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisite: 
Genetics 21. Open to juniors and seniors. (43). 

Second semester; M., F., 10:00; third hour to be arranged; Pro- 
fessor Livesay. 

31, 32, 33, 34. Special Problems. (1 to 3 Hrs. per semester.) 
Open to juniors and seniors majoring in Animal Husbandry. (46). 
First and second semesters; staff. 

35, 36. Animal Husbandry Seminar. (1 Hr. per semester). 
Required of seniors majoring in Animal Husbandry. (50). 
First and second semesters; M., 5:00-6:00; staff. 

37. Summer Practice. (1 Hr.) To be arranged in consultation 
with the head of the department. (52). 

41. Livestock Judging. (2 Hrs.) Judging breeding and fat 
classes of livestock. (41). 

First semester; two laboratory periods, W., 2:00-5:00; S., 8:00- 
12:00; staff. 

43. (143) Advanced Stock Judging. (2 Hrs.) Students taking 
this course will be required to participate in a tour of inspection of 



lElectives recommended: Agronomy 10 and 13; Chemistry 10; Dairy husband- 
ry 11, 12 and 38 ; Farm economics 7 and 31 : Farm mechanics 51, 52 and 55 ; 
Genetics 21; Poultry husbandry 5, 14, 15 and 21; Veterinary science 1, 2, 4 and 6; 
Zoology 7, 10 and 16, 



254 West Virginia University 

representative flocks, herds and studs. Prerequisite: Animal Hus- 
bandry 41. 

First semester; two laboratory periods, W., 2:00-5:00; S., 8:00- 
12:00; staff. 

47. Herd and Flock Book Study. (3 Hrs.) (47). 
First semester; M., F., 5:00; one laboratory period, T., Th.; 
8:00-10:00; Assistant Professor Wilson. 

60. Beef Production. (3 Hrs.) For juniors and seniors. 
Second semester; T., Th., 11:00; and one laboratory period, T., 

2:00-5:00; Assistant Professor Wilson. 

61. Horse and Mule Production. (3 Hrs.) For juniors and 
seniors. 

First semester; M., F., hours to be arranged; Assistant Profes- 
sor Wilson. 

62. Mutton and Wool Production. (3 Hrs.) For juniors and 
seniors. 

Second semester; T., Th., 10:00; and one laboratory period, Th., 
2:00-5:00; Assistant Professor Wilson and Mr. Shaw. 

64. Pork Production. (3 Hrs.) For juniors and seniors. (63). 
Second semester; T., Th., 8:00, and one laboratory period, F., 
2:00-5:00; Assistant Professor Still well. 

66. Meats. (1 Hr.) Prerequisite; Animal Husbandry 41. (65). 
Second semester; S., 9:00-12:00; Assistant Professor Still well. 

67. Meats. (2 Hrs.) Farm butchering, curing and care of 
meats. Visit to one of the large packing houses of Pittsburgh re- 
quired of all students taking this course. Prerequisite: Animal Hus- 
bandry 66. (64). 

First semester; F., 2:00-6:00; Assistant Professor Stillwell. 

181, 182, 183, 184. Research. (1 to 5 Hrs, per semester). (49). 
First and second semesters; hours to be arranged; staff. 



The College of Agriculture 255 

DAIRY HUSBANDRY* 

Professor Anthony, Associate Professor Henderson, Mr. Gifford 

and Mr. Trout. 

1.* Farm Dairying. (3 Hrs.) Required of Freshmen. This 
course is prerequisite to all other courses in the department. (21). 

First semester; M., F., 10:00; on laboratory period, T., 2:00- 
5:00, or S., 9:00-12:00; Professor Anthony, Mr. Gifford and Mr. 
Trout. 

5. Dairy By-Products. (3 Hrs.) A study of ice cream manu- 
facture; fermented milks, milk sugar, condensed milk. (25). 

First semester; M., F., 9:00; one laboratory period, T., 2:00- 
5:00; Mr. Trout. 

6. Butter and Cheese Manufacture. (3 Hrs.) (26). 

Second semester; M., F., 11:00; one laboratory period, S., 9:00- 
12:00; Mr. Trout. 

7. Market Milk. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisite: Botany 10. (27). 
First semester; T., Th., 9:00; one laboratory period, F., 2:00- 

5:00; Associate Professor Henderson. 

11. Purebred Dairy Cattle. (3 Hrs.) (24). 

First semester; M. F., 11:00; one laboratory period, M., 2:00- 
5:00; Professor Anthony. 

12. (112) Milk Production. (4 Hrs.) For juniors and seniors. 
(23). 

Second semester; M. W. F., 9:00; one laboratory period, M., 2:00- 
5:00; Professor Anthony. 

31, 32, 33, 34. Special Problems. (1 to 2 Hrs. per semester.) 
For juniors and seniors. (34). 

First and second semesters; hours to be arranged; Professor 
Anthony. 

35. Summer Practice. (1 Hr.) Course to be arranged in consul- 
tation with the head of the department. 

Professor Anthony. 

36.** (136) Dairy Chemistry. (2 Hrs.) For seniors. Prerequi- 
sites: Dairy Husbandry 5 and 6. 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. 

38. (138) Advanced Dairy Judging. (2 Hrs.) For seniors. 
Prerequisite: Dairy Husbandry 11. (37). 

Second semester; two laboratory periods, T., Th., 4:00-6:00; 
Associate Professor Henderson, Mr. Gifford and Mr. Trout. 

181, 182, 183, 184. Graduate Research. (1 to 5 Hrs. per semes- 
ter.) Special assigned dairy problems. (38). 

First and second semesters; hours to be arranged; Professor 
Anthony. 



lThe following electives are recommended for students whose major is Dairy 
husbandry: Agronomy 10; Animal husbandry 11 and 22; Farm economics 3 and 31; 
Genetics 21; Veterinary science 1, 2, 4 and 6; Zoology 7. 



256 West Virginia University 

ENTOMOLOGY.* 

Professor Peairs and Mr. Craig. 

2.** General Entomology. (4 Hrs.) Prerequisite to courses 3, 4 
5, 6,7,8, 9 and 10. (i). 

Second semester; M., W., F., 11:00; one laboratory period, Th., 
or F., 2:00. 

3 ** (103**) Advanced General Entomology. (3 Hrs.) 
First semester; T., Th., 10:00-12:00. 

4.** Economic Entomology. (2 Hrs.) (9). 
Second semester; M., F., 10:00. 

5,** 6,** 7,** 8,** (105,** 106,** 107,** 108**). iSystematic En- 
tomology. (1 to 3 Hrs. per semester.) First and second semesters; 
hours to be arranged. (4). 

9,** 10,** Research. (1 to 3 hours per 'semester.) (5). 
First and second semesters; hours to be arranged. 

30.* Apiculture. (2 Hrs.) Spring and summer practice in bee- 
keeping. 

Second semester; T., 2:00-6:00. 

31.* Apiculture. (1 Hr.) Fall and winter practice in bee- 
keeping. 

First semester; S., 9:00. 

170.** Insect Biology. (3 Hrs.) (11). 
Second semester; hours to be arranged. 

181,** 182,** 183,** 184.** Research. (1 to 3 Hrs. per semester.) 
First and second semesters; hours to be arranged. 



lThe following electives are recommend for students whose major is entomology: 
Agronomy 5 and 10 ; Botany 5, 21 and 31 ; Horticulture 6, 9 and 18 ; Plant pathology 
3 ; Poultry 9 ; Veterinary science 6 ; Zoology 7 or 31, 18, 10, 40, 16 and 25. 



The College of Agriculture 257 

FARM ECONOMICS* 

Professor Dadisman, Dr. Eke, Mr. Cornell and Mr. Armentrout. 

General Courses. 

2.** Rural Economics. (4 Hrs.) Required of sophomores. 
Second semester; M., T., Th., F., 10:00; Professor Dadisman. 

3.* Farm Management. (3 Hrs.) Open to juniors and seniors. 
Prerequisite: Farm Economics 2. (1). 

First semester; M., W., F., 9:00; Dr. Eke. 

5. Farm Management Laboratory. (1 Hr.) A laboratory course 
to accompany Farm Management 3. (12). 

First semester; T., 2:00-5:00; Dr. Eke. 

6. Development of Agriculture. (3 Hrs.) (4). 

Second semester; M., W., F., 11:00; Professor Dadisman. 

7. Farm Records and Accounts. (2 Hrs.) (8). 
First semester; M., 2:00 to 6:00; Dr. Eke. 

13, 14. Special Problems. (1 to 3 Hrs. per semester.) Open to 
seniors. (6). 

Both semesters; hours to be arranged; staff. 

16. (116) Agricultural Land Problems. (2 Hrs.) Open to 
seniors. A study of land systems and policies of the leading agri- 
cultural countries. (9). 

Second semester; T., Th., 9:00; Professor Dadisman and Dr. 
Eke. 

31. Marketing Agricultural Products. (2 Hrs.) One day will 
be spent in Pittsburgh studying livestock, fruit and vegetable mar- 
kets. (7). 

First semester; T., Th., 11:00; Mr. Armentrout. 

33. Co-operative Marketing of Agricultural Products. (2 Hrs.) 
First semester; hours to be arranged; Mr. Armentrout. 

181, 182, 183, 184. Research in Farm Economics. (1 to 3 Hrs. 
per semester.) (13). 

First and second semesters; hours to be arranged; staff. 



lThe following' electives are recommended for students whose major is in farm 
economics : Economics 1, 2, 11, 12, 41, 5, 21 and 22 ; History 49 ; Poultry 10 ; Soci- 
ology' 4. 



258 West Virginia University 

Farm Mechanics. 

51. Farm Mechanics. (4 Hrs.) (25). 

First semester; T., Th., 9:00; and F., 2:00-6:00; Mr. Cornell. 

52. Farm Shop Work. (2 Hrs.) (30). 
Second semester; M., 2:00-6:00; Mr. Cornell. 

55. Farm Structures. (2 Hrs.) (26). 
First semester; Th., 2:00-6:00; Mr. Cornell. 

56. Farm Machinery. (3 Hrs.) (24). 

Second semester; T., Th., 8:00; and S., 9:00-12:00; Mr. Cornell. 

57. Farm Sanitation. (2 Hrs.) 

First semester; T., Th., 8:00; Mr. Cornell. 

60. Farm Power. (2 Hrs.) Open to juniors and seniors. Pre- 
requisite; Farm Mechanics 51. (28) 

Second semester; Th., 2:00-6:00; Mr. Cornell. 

The following electives are recommended in farm mechanics: 
Engineering 2, 7, 10, 20 and 100. 

GENETICS 

Professor Peairs. 

21.** (121) Genetics. (3 Hrs.) A study of the principles of 
heredity. 

First semester; M., F., 10:00; T., Th., or M., F., 4:30. 

22.** (122). Genetics. (1 Hr.) Laboratory work to follow course 
21. Prerequisite: course 21. 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. 



The College of Agriculture 259 

HORTICULTURE. 1 

Professor Dorsey, Associate Professors Knowlton and Crane, 
Assistant Professor Westover, Mr. Angelo, Mr. 
Currence and Mr. Stark. 

Pomology. 

1* Elementary Pomology. (3 Hrs.) Required of sophomores. 
An introduction to the study of fruit growing. (2). 

First semester; T., Th., 8:00, and one laboratory period M., 
2:00-5:00; Mr. Angelo. 

6. Small Fruits. (3 Hrs.) Open to juniors and seniors. Pre- 
requisite: Horticulture 1. (5). 

Second semester; T., Th., 8:00, and one laboratory period Th., 
2:00-5:00; Mr. Angelo. 

9. (109) Systematic Pomology. (3 Hrs.) Open to juniors and 
seniors. Prerequisite: Horticulture 1. (4). 

First semester; T., Th., 9:00; S., 9:00-12:00. Associate Pro- 
fessor Knowlton. 

12. (112) Commercial Fruit Production. (4 Hrs.) Open to 
juniors and seniors. Prerequisite: Horticulture 9. (7). 

Second semester; M., W., F., 9:00, and one laboratory period F., 
2:00-5:00; Associate Professor Crane. 

13. Packing, Marketing and Storage. (4 Hrs.) Open to juniors 
and seniors. Prerequisite: Horticulture 9 and 12. (21). 

First semester; M. W., F., 9:00, and one laboratory period W., 
2:00-5:00; Associate Professor Crane. 

15. Fruit Judging. (1 Hr.) Prerequisite: Horticulture 9. (16). 
First semester; one laboratory period F., 2:00-5:00; Associate 
Professor Knowlton. 

17. Advanced Fruit Judging. (1 Hr.) A continuation of Horti- 
culture 15. (18). 

First semester; one laboratory period F., 2:00-5:00; Associate 
Professor Knowlton. 

18. (118) Sprays and Spraying. (2 Hrs.) Open to seniors. 
Prerequisite: Consultation. (28). 

Second semester; Sat., 8:00-12:00; Associate Professor Crane. 



lThe following- electives are recommended for students whose major is horti- 
culture: Agronomy 16; Botany 12, 32 and 36; Farm economics 33; Geology 8; 
Economics 40 and 41 ; Chemistry 21 ; Public speaking 3 and 12. 



260 West Virginia University 

19. (119). Horticultural iField Trip. (1 to 2 Hrs.) Open to 
seniors. A trip of one or two weeks (the first week to be before col- 
lege opens) will be made through the fruit regions of Eastern West 
Virginia, Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania. Registration should 
be made in the 'spring before college closes. Prerequisite: Horticul- 
ture 9 and 12. (9). 

First semester; Professor Dorsey and Associate Professor 
Crane. 

Vegetable Gardening. 

30.* Elementary Vegetable Gardening. (3 Hrs.) Required of 
freshmen. (3). 

Second semester; T., Th., 9:00, and one laboratory period W., 
2:00-5:00; Mr. Currence. 

32. Commercial Vegetable Gardening. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisite: 
Horticulture 30. (8). 

Second semester; Th., 10:00-12:00, and T., 2:00-5:00; Assistant 
Professor Westover. 

33. [Systematic Olericulture. (3 Hrs.) A study of the classifica- 
tion of vegetables. Prerequisite: Horticulture 30. (22). 

First semester; M., F., 10:00; one laboratory period W., 2:00- 
5:00; Assistant Professor Westover. 

35. Vegetable Forcing. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisite: Horticulture 30 
(27). 

First semester; T., Th., 11:00; one laboratory period M., 2:00- 
5:00; Mr. Currence. 

General Courses. 

49, 50. Special Problems. (1 to 2 Hrs. per semester.) Arrange- 
ments must be made for problems before the close of the junior year. 
(10). 

. First and second semesters; hours to be arranged; staff. 

51, 52, 53, 54. (151, 152, 153, 154). Horticultural Seminar. (1 

Hr. per semester.) For juniors and seniors. (11). 

First and second semesters; hours to be arranged; Professor 
Dorsey. 

55, 56. (155, 156). Advanced Horticulture. (3 Hrs. per semes- 
ter.) Open to (seniors. Prerequisites: Horticulture 9 and 12, and 
Botany 12. (13). 

First and second semesters; M., W., F., 11:00; Professor Dorsey 
and Associate Professor Knowlton. 



The College of Agriculture 261 

Summer Practice. (1 Hr.) Work to be arranged in advance 
by consultation with department staff. (17). 
Staff. 

58.* (158) Horticultural Crop Breeding. (3 Hrs.) Open to 
seniors. Prerequisite: Genetics 21. (19). 

Second semester; M., W., F., 9:00; Professor Dorsey. 

181, 182, 183, 184, Graduate Research. (5 Hrs. per semester.) 
(29). 

First and second semesters; hours to be arranged; Professor 
Dorsey, Associate Professors Knowlton and Crane and Assistant 
Professor Westover. 

PLANT PATHOLOGY.i 

Professor Giddings and Assistant Professor Leonian. 

3.** Economic Plant Pathology. (3 Hrs.) (4). 
First semester; one lecture and two laboratory periods, T., Th., 
2:00-5:00; Professor Giddings. 

9,** 10.** (109,** 110**) Experimental Plant Pathology. (2 to 5 
Hrs. per semester.) Prerequisite: Plant pathology 3 or its equivalent. 
(1). 

First and second semesters; hours to be arranged; Professor 
Giddings and Assistant Professor Leonian. 

15,** 16.** Special Problems. (1 to 3 Hrs. per semester.) 
First and second semesters; hours to be arranged; Professor 
Giddings and Assistant Professor Leonian. 

181,** 182,** 183,** 184.** Research. (2 to 5 Hrs. per semes- 
ter.) Prerequisites: Plant pathology 3 and 9 or their equivalent. (2). 

First and second semesters; hours to be arranged; Professor 
Giddings and Assistant Professor Leonian. 



lThe folllowing eleefcives are recommended for students whose major is Plant 
pathology; Agronomy 5; Botany 5, 21, 11, 31 and 14; Chemistry 60 and 62; Ento- 
mology 4 and 5 ; Genetics 21 ; Horticulture 9, 12 and 32 ; Zoology 10. 



262 West Virginia University 

POULTRY HUSBANDRY* 

Associate Professor Andrews and Mr. Wightman. 

2.* Farm Poultry. (3 Hrs.) Required of freshmen. Prerequi- 
site for all other courses. (1). 

Second semester; M., F., 10:00; laboratory periods, M., 2:00- 
5:00, or S., 9:00-12:00; Associate Professor Andrews and Mr. 
Wightman. 

5. Housing and Feeding. (2 Hrs.) 

First semester; Th., 2:00-6:00; Associate Professor Andrews. 

6. Incubation and Brooding. (2 Hrs.) Lectures and practice. 
Second semester; M., 2:00-6:00; Associate Professor Andrews 

and Mr. Wightman. 

9. Poultry Diseases and Parasites. (1 Hr.) Lectures and dem- 
onstrations. 

First semester; W., 2:00-5:00; Associate Professor Andrews. 

10. Marketing. (2 Hrs.) Lectures and practice. (8). 
Second semester; S., 8:00-12:00. 

14. Breeds and Breeding. (3 Hrs.) (7). 

Second semester; M., F., 9:00; one laboratory period, F., 2:00- 
5:00; Associate Professor Andrews and Mr. Wightman. 

15, 16, 17, 18. Special Problems. (1 to 3 Hrs. per semester.) 
Practice in incubation, brooding, flock management, etc. 

Both semesters; hours to be arranged; Associate Professor 
Andrews and staff. 

21. (121) Advanced Poultry Judging. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisite: 
Poultry 14. (12). 

First semester; F., 2:00-6:00; Associate Professor Andrews and 
Mr. Wightman. 

181, 182, 183, 184. Research. (1 to 3 Hrs. per semester.) (10). 
Both semesters; hours to be arranged; Associate Professor 
Andrews. 



lThe following eleetives are recommended for students whose major is Poultry 
husbandry: Agricultural education 31; Animal husbandry 11, 12 and 22; Farm 
economics 3, 7 and 31 ; Farm mechanics 52 and 55 ; Genetics 21 ; Zoology 7 and 10 ; 
Veterinary science 1, 2, 4 and 6. 



The College of Agriculture 263 

SOILS 

Associate Professor Deatrick. 

1.* The Properties of Soils. (3 Hrs.) Required of juniors. To 
be preceded or accompanied by Physics and Geology. 

First semester; T., Th., 8:00, and one laboratory period, T. or 
F., 2:00-5:00. 

2. Principles of Soil Management. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisite: 
Soils 1. 

Second semester; T., Th., 11:00. 

3. 4. Special Problems. (1 to 3 Hrs. per semester.) Work as- 
signed is suited to the needs of the individual student. 

Both semesters and summer; hours to be arranged. 

5. Soil Biology. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisites: Soils 1, and Botany 10. 

First semester; hours to be arranged. 

7, (107). Soil Chemistry. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisites: Soils 1 and 
qualitative and organic chemistry. Open to seniors. (6). 

Either semester; three laboratory periods to be arranged. 

181, 182, 183, 184. Research. (1 to 5 Hrs. per semester.) (4). 
Both semesters and summer; hours to be arranged. 

The following electives are recommended to students whose 
major is soils: Botany 5, 21, and 31; Chemistry 5, 6, 33 and 60; 
Farm mechanics 51; Geology 62; Plant Pathology 3. 

VETERINARY SCIENCE 

Mr. 

1. Anatomy and Physiology. (3 Hrs.) 

First semester; M., F., 10:00, and one laboratory period Th., 
2:00-5:00. 

2. Veterinary Medicine and Surgery. (3 Hrs.) 

Second semester; T., Th., 8:00, and one laboratory period, Th., 
10:00-12:00. 

4. Infectious Diseases. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisites: Botany 41, and 
Veterinary science 1. (3). 

Second semester; T., 2:00-6:00. 

6. Parasites of Farm Animals. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisites: Ento- 
mology 2 and Veterinary science 1. (5). 

Second semester; W., 2:00-6:00. 



264 West Virginia University 

INSTRUCTION IN HOME ECONOMICS. 

ORGANIZATION. 

For purposes of administration the department is organized 
under the College of Agriculture, as follows: 

1. In the College of Agriculture a curriculum is outlined where- 
by students may select as their major either general home economics 
or vocational home economics in preparation for the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Home Economics. 

2. In the College of Arts and Sciences students working for the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts may take home economics as a major and 
must meet the requirements for the degree as prescribed by that col- 
lege (page 104 of University catalogue). The head of the department 
of home economics acts as class officer for such students. 

3. Extension work in home economics is given under the direc- 
tion of the Division of Agricultural Extension. 

AIM AND SCOPE. 

The course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Home 
Economics is planned for women students and especially for those 
who wish to teach home economics in vocational schools and other 
institutions or who wish to learn the business of home keeping. The 
aim of the course is to give women such training as will best prepare 
them to assume their responsibilities as members of a household and 
a community. This training includes: first, a knowledge of those 
sciences which are fundamental to an understanding of the principles 
of home economics; second, technical courses in food and nutrition, 
the applied arts, clothing and textiles, health and child care, home 
management and teacher training; third, a general knowledge of the 
laws of production and consumption and social relationships obtained 
from courses in history and sociology; fourth, an appreciation and 
intelligent use of English which is developed through courses in oral 
and written English and in study of English literature. 

To provide for this training a curriculum is suggested. Sufficient 
elective® are allowed to permit the student to qualify for vocational 
home economics, or to take special courses in agriculture, or to select 
other courses in which she is interested. 

EQUIPMENT. 

The department occupies two floors of the* wing of Oglebay Hall. 
On the first floor are two large well equipped food laboratories, a 
suite of rooms consisting of dining room, kitchen and reception room, 



The College of Agriculture 265 

a textile laboratory, a reading room, and the offices of the depart- 
ment. On the second floor there are three laboratories equipped for 
work in clothing and applied art. There is also on this floor a large 
recitation room. 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS. 

For admission to the course leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Home Economics, the requirements are the same as for 
admission to the course in agriculture. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF 
SCIENCE IN HOME ECONOMICS. 

Credits Required. 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Home Economics will be 
conferred upon any student who satisfies the entrance requirements 
and offers one hundred and twenty-eight hours credit for college 
courses, including all requirements set forth below. 

The "semester hour" is the standard in computing the amount 
of work required for graduation. The "hour" represents the amount 
of work done in one semester (eighteen weeks) in one recitation 
hour with two preparation hours a week, or in three hours practice 
or laboratory work requiring no outside preparation. No student is 
permitted to register for less than fouteen hours or more than seven- 
teen hours of work in any one semester. 

Required and Elective Courses. 

Of the one hundred and twenty-eight hours credit required for the 
degree, seventy-seven hours are prescribed as indicated in the cur- 
riculum which follows. The remaining fifty-one hours must be elected 
from courses approved by the class officer. The required and elec- 
tive courses in the subject of home economics must amount to not 
fewer than forty hours in all. 

To qualify for the vocational home economics certificate, the 
student must take the following courses in addition to those listed in 
the curriculum: 

1. Home economics 61 and 62. 

2. Such courses in education as are prescribed for the high school 
certificate. 

For students interested in extension work the following courses 
are recommended: Horticulture 1 and 30; Poultry husbandry 2; Dairy 
husbandry 1; Agricultural education 20. 



266 West Virginia University 

Class Officer. 

The head of the department of home economics will act as class 
officer. 

All students who wish to enter the University for the purpose of 
taking home economics should confer with the head of the depart- 
ment before registering. 

Thesis. 

Each candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Home 
Economics may 'be required to prepare a thesis on some subject re- 
lated to the work in home economics. The thesis will be based upon 
the student's personal work. The subject of the thesis must be pre- 
sented in writing to the head of the home economics department by 
the first of November of the academic year in which the student is 
a candidate ft>r a degree. The completed thesis must be presented 
for approval not later than thirty days prior to commencement day. 

Classification of Students. 

To be classified as a conditioned freshman a student must have 
credit for at least fifteen units of entrance requirements; to be 
classified as a regular freshman she must have fulfilled all entrance 
requirements. To be classified as a sophomore she must have credit 
for twenty-five hours of college work; as a junior fifty-eight hours; 
as a senior, ninety-two hours. 

COURSES REQUIRED OF ALL STUDENTS IN HOME 
ECONOMICS. 

English Composition (English 1 and 2) __ 6 hrs. 

English Literature (English 3 and 4) 4 

Chemistry 8 

History 5 

Biological Sciences (including Botany 41) __.:.. 10 

Economics or Sociology 4 

37 hrs. 
Home Economics — 

Foods 9 hrs. 

Textiles and Clothing 7 

Applied Art 7 

Home Management 4 

Elective 13 - 

40 40 hrs. 

Electives 51 

128 hrs. 



The College of Agriculture 
CURRICULUM SUGGESTED. 



267 



The curriculum given below is suggestive except as regards 
subjects, and may be varied by the class officer to meet the needs of 
individual students but the curriculum indicates the subjects which are 
usually advised for students who desire to take major work in home 
economics. 



Freshman Year. 



First Semester. 



Second Semester. 



English 1 
Home Econ. 31 
History 29 
Chemistry 1 
Home Econ. 15 
Home Econ. 1 


Hrs. 
3 

4 
3 
4 
2 
1 17 


English 2 
Ho ire Econ. 4 
History 49 
Chemistry 2 




Hrs. 
3 
5 
3 
4 15 




Sophomore Year. 






First Semester. 




Second Semester. 




Botany 1 
English 3 
Home Econ. 19 
Education 
Elective 


Hrs. 

4 

2 

2 

3 

5 16 

Junior 


Zoology 4 
English 4 
Hone Econ. 22 
Education 
Botany 41 

Year. 




Hrs. 

5 

2 

3 

3 

3 16 


First Semester. 




Second Semester. 




Home Econ. 7 
Home Econ. 33 
Hygiene 9 
Sociology 1 
Elective 


Hrs. 
4 
3 
2 

3 
4 16 

Senior 


Home Econ. 12 

or Home Econ. 
Home Econ. 34 
Home Econ. 40 
Sociology 8 
Elective 

Year. 


26 

5 


Hrs. 

4 
2 
3 
2 
2 

or 7 16 


First Semester. 




Second Semester. 




Home Econ. 51 


Hrs. 
3 


Home Econ. 54 




Hrs. 
3 



Elective 



13 16 Elective 



13 16 



268 West Virginia University 

Those specializing in Clothing should take: 

Home Economies 26' 2 hrs. 

Home Economics 23 2 

Home Economics 25 3 

Economics 1 and 2 6 

Those specializing in Foods should take: 

Home Economics 12 4 hrs. 

Home Economics 71, 72, 73, 74 1 to 4 

Home Economics 8 3 

Chemisjary 31 4 

Those spjapalizing in Teacher Training 'should take: 

J Economics 61 2 hrs. 
Economics 62 2 
tion (inelud. Ed. 44 and 48) 20 
ihman year all students will be expected to take Home 
1 hour, which is a general survey course showing the 
Diis of home economics. 
For students who have had no work in home economics in high 
school, Home Economics 3 — 2 hours, and Home Economics 16 — J 
hours, or their equivalent, should be taken. 

COURSES IN HOME ECONOMICS. 

Professor Colwell, Assistant Professors Richmond and Nesbitt, 
Mrs. Taylor, Mrs. Cochrane, Miss Slater and Miss Goddard. 

(1) iStudents in the 'College of Arts and Sciences who select 
home economics as their major should take courses 4 and 7 in the 
food and nutrition group, courses 31, 33, and 34 in the applied arts 
group, and courses 15, 19 and 22 in the textiles and clothing group. 
Courses 51 and 54 in the home management group 'are strongly rec- 
ommended. Students who are preparing to teach home economics 
should take courses 61 and 62 in the teacher training group. 

(2) Science requirements: Chemistry 1 and 2, Botany 41 and 
seven additional hours in Biology are /prerequisite or parallel for all 
courses in home economics except certain courses listed below. 

(3) iStudents in the College of Arts and Sciences who do not 
wish to take the sciences required may elect the following courses: 
2, 15, 16, 19, 31. 

(4) Attention is called to the fact that students who take the 
B.S.H.E. degree are required to take a minimum of 40 hours in home 
economics. Those students who take the A.B. degree must take not 
more than 36 hours in home economics. 

(5) .Students who wish to take the advanced work in home 
economics are expected to have applied in the home, until skill has 
been acquired, the principles taught in the elementary courses. 

(6) Those students who wish to secure the high school certiifi- 



The College of Agriculture 269 

cate must take 20 hours of education in addition to the work pre- 
scribed in home economics and related subjects. 

Survey. 

1. Home Economics Survey. (1 Hr.) A brief survey of the 
scope and field of home economics education. (10). 

First semester; W., 4:00; Professor Colwell and staff. 

Foods and Nutrition. 

2. Food Selection. (2 Hrs.) Not open to major students. Open 
to all other students with no prerequisite. (6). 

Second semester; T., Th., V -00; Professor Colwell. 

3. Food Preparation. (2 Hx. , Required of students who have 
not had work in home economics in high school or any vocational ex- 
perience. (4). 

First and second semesters; lectures and laboratory, M., F., 2:00- 
5:00; Assistant Professor Nesbitt, 112 O. H. 

4. Food Study. (5 Hrs.) Prerequisites: Home Ecoi omics 3 or its 
equivalent, and Chemistry 1. (5). 

Second semester; T., Th., 9:00; W., 1:00. Laboratory sec- 
tions, T., Th., 10:00-12:00; M., F., 2:00-4:00; Assistant Professor 
Nesbitt, 208, 112 O. H. 

7. Dietetics. (4 Hrs.) Prerequisite: Home Economics 4. (24). 
First semester; T., Th., 10:00; laboratory sections, T., Th., 2:00- 

4:30; M., F., 10:00-12:00; Professor Colwell and Assistant Profes- 
sor Nesbitt. 

8. Group Feeding. (3 Hrs.) (Limited section). (3). 

First and second semesters; M., F., 10:00; laboratory, W., 2:00- 
5:00. 

12. Human Nutrition. (4 Hrs.) Prerequisites: Chemistry 31, 
Home Economics 4, 7. (25). 

Second semester; T., Th., 8:00; laboratory, M., F., 2:00-4:30; 
Assistant Professor Nesbitt, 208, 112 O. H. 

Textiles and Clothing. 

15. Clothing Selection. (2 Hrs.) No prerequisites. (41). 
First and second semesters; M., F., 8:00; Mrs. Cochrane and 

assistants. 

16. Elementary Course in Clothing Construction. (2 Hrs.) Pre- 
requisite: Home Economics 15 must parallel or precede. (42). 

First and second semesters; laboratory sections, M., F., 2:00- 



270 West Virginia University 

5:00; T., Th., 2:00-5:00; T., Th., 10:00-12:00; Mrs. Cochrane and 
assistants. 

19. Textile Fabrics. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisite: Home Economies 
15. (13). 

First and second semesters; M., F., 2:00-4:00; Mrs. Taylor, 110 
O. H. 

22. Selection and Construction of Clothing. (3 Hrs.) Prerequi- 
sites: Home Economics 15, 19, 31. (44). 

Second semester; W., 1:00; laboratory sections, M., F., 10:00- 
12:00; T., Th., 2:00-5:00; Mrs. Cochrane, 211 O. H. 

23. Millinery. (2 Hrs.) (16). 

First and second semesters; T., Th., 2:00-4:00; Mrs Cochrane, 
211 O. H. 

25. Advanced Clothing. (3 Hrs.) (17)! 

First semester; W., 8:00; laboratory, M., F., 2:00-5:00; Mrs. 
Cochrane, 211 O. H. 

26. Textile Chemistry. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisite: Home Economics 
19, Chemistry 1. (15). 

Second semester; M., F., 2:00-4:00; Miss Slater, 110 O. H. 

Applied Arts. 

31. Applied Design. (4 Hrs.) (11). 

First semester; T., Th., 9:00; laboratory, T., Th., 10:00-12:00; 
W., 2:00-5:00; Saturday, 9:00-12:00; Miss Slater, 210 O. H. 

Second semester; T., Th., 8:00; laboratory, M., F., 2:00-5:00; 
Miss Slater, 210 O. H. 

33. House Architecture. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisite: Home Econo- 
mics 31. (30). 

First semester; W., 8:00; T., Th., 2:00-4:00; Miss Slater, 210 O. 
H. 

34. House Decoration. (3 Hrs.) Suggested prerequisites: Home 
Economics 19, 31, 33. (31). 

Second semester; first section, T., Th., 2:00-4:00; second section, 
M., F., 10.00-12:00; Miss Slater, 210 O. H. 

Health and Child Care. 

40. Child Care. (2 Hrs.) Prerequisites: (if possible) Hygiene 
and Sanitation 8, Home Economics 4, 7, 15, 16. (9). 

Second semester; T., Th., 70:00; Professor Colwell. 



The College of Agriculture 271 

Home Management. 

51. Mechanics of the House. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisites: All re- 
quired courses in home economics. (53). 

First semester; M., F., 10:00; W., 8:00; Mrs. Taylor, 208 O. H. 

54. Home Management. (3 Hrs.) (8). 

Second semester; M., F., 10:00; W., 8:00 Mrs. Taylor, 208 O. H. 

Teacher Training. 

61. Home Economics in Public Schools. (2 Hrs.) Open to senior 
home economics majors. Parallel courses, Education 44 and 48. Pre- 
requisites: All required home economics courses. (26). 

First semester; M., F., 8:00; Assistant Professor Richmond. 

62. Teachers' Course in Home Economics. (2 Hrs.) Open only 
to senior home economics majors. Prerequisite: Home Economics 61. 
Parallel course, Education 48, if not previously taken . (27). 

Second semester; M., F., 8:00; Assistant Professor Richmond. 

64. Seminar in Home Economics Education. (2 Hrs.) Open 
only to senior home economics majors who have completed Home 
Economics 61. (28). 

Second semester; hours to be arranged; Assistant Professor 
Richmond. 

General Courses. 

71, 72, 73, 74. Special Problems. (1 to 4 Hrs. per semester.) 
Open to juniors and seniors. Thesis course. Lectures, conferences, 
laboratory work. Prerequisites: All elementary courses in home 
economics, Chemistry 1 and 2, Botany 1 and 2 or Zoology 1 and 2 or 
equivalent. (8). 

First and second semesters; hours to be arranged ; Prof essor 
Colwell and staff. 



2V2 West Virginia University 

CO-OPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN AGRICULTURE 
AND HOME ECONOMICS. 

The Agricultural Extension Division was created by act of the 
legislature at the 1913 session, and the administration of the co- 
operative extension work in West Virginia is based on a memorandum 
of understanding between the College of Agriculture of West Virginia 
University and the United States Department of Agriculture, approved 
July 2, 1914, ; by D. F. Houston, Secretary of Agriculture. 

In this memorandum the College of Agriculture agrees: 

(1) To organize and maintain a definite and distinct adminis- 
trative division for the management and conduct of extension work 
in agriculture and home economics, with a responsible leader selected 
by the College and satisfactory to the Department of Agriculture. 

(2) To administer through such extension division thus organ- 
ized any and all funds it has or may hereafter receive for such work 
from appropriations made by Congress or the State Legislature, by 
allotment from its Board of Trustees or from any other source. 

(3) To ico-operate with the United States Department of Agri- 
culture in all extension work in agriculture and home economics 
which said Department is or shall be authorized by Congress to con- 
duct in the State of West Virginia. 

The United States Department of Agriculture agrees: 

(1) To organize and maintain a States Relations Service. 

(2) To carry on in co-operation with the College of Agriculture 
of West Virginia University all demonstration and other forms of 
extension work in agriculture and home economics which the Depart- 
ment is authorized by Congress to conduct in the State of West Vir- 
ginia. 

The College of Agriculture and the Department of Agriculture 
mutually agree: 

***** That all agents appointed for co-operative extension 
work in agriculture and home economics in the State of West Virginia 
shall be joint representatives of the College of Agriculture and the 
United States Department of Agriculture. ***** That the head- 



The College of Agriculture 273 

quarters of the State organization shall be at the College of Agricul- 
ture, Morgantown, West Virginia. 

In 'carrying out this memorandum, co-operative projects for 1924- 
25 were agreed upon in: 

1. Administration. 9. Animal Diseases. 

2. Publications. 10. Agronomy. 

3. County Agents. 11. Horticulture. 

4. Home Demonstration. 12. Plant Diseases. 

5. Boys' and Girls' Clubs. 14. Rural Organization. 

6. Animal Husbandry. 15. Institutes and Exhibits. 

7. Poultry. 16. Negro Work. 

8. Dairying. 

Under Project No. 1, Administration, the object is set forth as 
follows : 

To co-ordinate and administer all agricultural and home eco- 
nomics extension work provided for under the general memorandum 
of understanding dated July 2, 1914, between the College of Agricul- 
ture, West Virginia University, and the United States Department of 
Agriculture, and co-operate with the county farm bureaus and such 
other state, county and local organizations or institutions as may ar- 
range for work under this project. 



The College of Law 



THE FACULTY. 

FRANK BUTLER TROTTER, A.M., LL.D., President of the Uni- 
versity. 

JOSEPH WARREN MADDEN, A.B., J.D., Dean of the College of 
Law and Professor of Law 

JAMES RUSSELL TROTTER, A.M., LL.B., Ph. D., Professor of 
Law 

THOMAS PORTER HARDMAN, M.A., LL.B., J.D., Professor of 
Law 

LEO CARLIN, A.B., LL.B., Professor of Law 

EDMUND CHARLES DICKINSON, A.B., J.D., Professor of Law 

CLIFFORD RAYMOND SNIDER, A.B., LL.B., S.J.D., Professor of 
Law 



JUDGES OF THE PRACTICE COURT AND SPECIAL 
LECTURERS ON PRACTICE. 

JOHN T. GRAHAM, Former Judge of the Sixth Judicial Circuit 

JOHN H. HATCHER, Judge of the Supreme Court of Appeals 

WARREN B. KITTLE, Judge of the Nineteenth Judicial Circuit 

ISAAC GRANT LAZZELLE, Judge of the Twenty-third Judicial 
Circuit 

CHARLES W. LYNCH, Former Judge of the Fifteenth Judicial 
Circuit and Former Judge of the Supreme Court of Appeals 

HAYMOND MAXWELL, Judge of the Fifteenth Judicial Circuit 

A. G. HUGHES, Judge of the Eighteenth Judicial Circuit 



BENJAMIN GARNET REEDER, A.B., LL.B., Librarian 

W. LOUISE FARRELL, Secretary 

KENNETH ESTABROOKE MICHAEL, Library Assistant 



2-76 West Virginia University 

HISTORY AND PURPOSE. 

The College of Law was established in 1878 and is the oldest 
professional school in the University. It is the only law school in 
the State of West Virginia. A large proportion of the bench and bar 
of West Virginia have been enrolled among its students. 

• Its course of instruction for the degree of Bachelor of Laws, 
originally requiring but one and later two years of law study, was, 
in 1912, fixed at three years. In 1913 a requirement of one year of 
college work for admission was added. In September 1924, a require- 
ment of two years of college work for admission became effective. 

In 1914 the College of Law was admitted to membership in the 
Association of American Law Schools, which is an organization of 
the leading law schools of the United States, for the purpose of estab- 
lishing and maintaining high standards of legal education. 

The purpose of the instruction given in the College of Law is 
to train the student thoroughly in the principles and procedure of 
the common law with particular reference to their application or 
modification by decision and statute in West Virginia. 

LAW BUILDING. 

The new building occupied by the 'College of Law is of fireproof 
construction, one hundred and forty-four feet in length, fifty-six feet 
in minimum width, and three stories in height. It contains three 
classrooms, a fully-equipped practice court room, study rooms with 
space for one hundred and fifty readers, private offices for members 
of the faculty, the 'dean, the librarian and the secretary; club rooms 
for both men and women students, a locker room, a clerk and sheriff's 
office, and stack and shelf space for twenty-five thousand volumes, 
with room for additional stacks and shelves up to a total capacity 
of approximately sixty thousand volumes. 



The College of Law 277 

LAW LIBRARY. 

The Law Library numbers about 17,500 volumes. It contains the 
reports of the highest courts of all the States, the insular possessions, 
and the District of Columbia, either complete or to the National Re- 
porter System (including several sets of Virginia and West Virginia 
reports), most of the published reports of the lower courts of the 
various States, the complete National Reporter System, the complete 
reports of the Federal courts, the various sets of annotated selected 
cases, the various American and English encyclopedias of law, the 
complete general digest system of the West Publishing Company, a 
collection of English reports containing the English Reprint and the 
Law Reports, the Irish Reports, the most important Canadian Reports, 
complete sets of leading English and American legal periodicals, over 
1,000 volumes of treatises, over 800 volumes of State and Federal 
statutes, including the latest codes, compiliations and acts of the 
United States and of all the States together with a complete collec- 
tion of the various codes and acts of Virginia and West Virginia, 
complete sets of the English Statutes, and over 500 volumes of briefs 
and records of cases decided by the Supreme Court of Appeals of 
West Virginia. 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS. 

CANDIDACY FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF LAWS. 

The following persons will be admitted to the College of Law as 
candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Laws: 

1. Graduates of colleges of approved standing. 

2. Those having credit: (a) for fifteen units preparatory work 
(see below), and (b) for not less than sixty-four hours of work of 
collegiate grade in an institution of approved standing, which must 
include ten hours of English (English 1, 2, 26 and 27 or equivalent) 
and six hours of history. Persons having credit for all preparatory 
entrance requirements and sixty of the sixty-four hours may be 
granted admission to the first year class conditioned upon the re- 
moval of such deficiency before the opening of the following year. 

To satisfy the fifteen units of secondary school work (work of a 
standard four- year high school), the following groups are required: 

(1) Three or four units of English. 1 

(2) Three units in any other subject. 

(3) Two units in Latin. 

(4) Two units in mathematics: one of algebra and one of plane 

geometry. 

(5) Four units elective. 



278 



West Virginia University 



Work in the following subjects not to exceed the number of units 
placed after each subject will ibe accepted. 



English 


4 units 


Science 3 








Physics 


1 unit 


Foreign languages 2 




Chemistry 


1 unit 


Latin 


4 units 


Biology 


1 unit 


Greek 


3 units 


Botany 


1 unit 


French 


3 units 


Geology 


1 unit 


German 


3 units 


Zoology 


1 unit 


Spanish 


2 units 


General science 


1 unit 


Italian 


2 units 


Physical geography 


1 unit 






Physiology 


1 unit 






Hygiene and sanitation 


1 unit 


Mathematics 








Algebra 


W2 units 


Vocational subjects (not to exceed 


Plane geometry 


1 unit 


four units in all). 




Solid geometry 


Y2 unit 


Agriculture 


3 units 


Trigonometry 


V2 unit 


Household arts 


3 units 






Manual training 


3 units 


History and economics 




Bookkeeping or book- 




History 


3 units 


keeping and commer- 




Civics 


1 unit 


cial arithmetic 


2 units 



Elementary economics 
and sociology 

Education 

Drawing 

Free-hand drawing 
Mechanical drawing 



1 unit 

2 units 



1 unit 
1 unit 



'Shorthand and type- 
writing 
Commercial geography 
Commercial law 



Music : — vioilin, 
piano 4 



organ or 



2 units 
V2 unit 
Y2 unit 



2 units 



lStudents who offer only three units of English for entrance must take six hours 
of college English in addition to the courses otherwise required for their degree. 

2Not less than two units of one foreign language will be accepted for entrance 
unless additional work in that language is done in college to complete a minimum 
requirement of two units. Six hours of college work is the equivalent of one unit 
of entrance. 

3 A group of two or three units in science may be made by combining one unit 
each of any of the following: physics, chemistry, biology, botany, zoology, geology. 

4For conditions governing credit for music see the Bulletin of the School of 
Music. 



The College of Law 279 

PRE-LEGAL COURSES IN COLLEGE OF ARTS AND 

SCIENCES 

Students are urged to complete at least three years of work in 
the College of Arts and Sciences before entering the College of Law, 
thus placing themselves in position to take advantage of the com- 
bined six-year course which leads to both arts and law degrees. 
Thorough work of collegiate quality in American and English con- 
stitutional history and English is particularly essential. 

Students who offer only two years, 64 hours, of college credit 
for admission are required to have completed the following courses: 
English 1 (3 hrs.), English 2 (3 hrs.), English 26 (2 hrs.), English 
27 (2 hrs.), and six hours of history which should include History 
17 (or 18), and History 22. Students coming from other colleges 
must present equivalent courses. In satisfaction of the remaining 
48 hours, which are elective, the following are recommended as well 
suited to pre-legal students: An advanced course in composition and 
rhetoric, History 18 (3 hrs.), History 23 (3 hrs.), one or two courses 
in mathematics to be selected from Mathematics 2 to 8 inclusive, 
Philosophy 13 (Elementary Psychology) (3 hrs.), Philosophy 22 
(Logic) (2 hrs.), Economics 1 (3 hrs.), Economics 2 (3 hrs.), Sociolo- 
gy 1 (3 hrs.), and Engineering 100 (Land Surveying) (3 hrs.). Col- 
lege courses in Latin and Greek are of great value. 

Students who do not offer two years of Latin for entrance to 
the freshman class in the College of Arts and Sciences must satisfy 
this requirement during the period of pre-legal study. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

In rare instances persons who can not qualify as candidates 
for the degree of bachelor of laws may be admitted as special stu- 
dents on petition to the Committee on Entrance, approved by the 
faculty of the College of Law. The applicant must show that he 
is more than 22 years of age, that he is unable to pursue such studies 
as will qualify him for admission as a regular student, that he 
possesses such educational training and practical experience as will 
enable him to pursue the study of law satisfactorily, and that he 
has satisfied the academic requirements specified by the order of the 
Supreme Court of Appeals, dated September 16, 1924, as preliminary 
to law study for all persons seeking admission to the bar in West Vir- 
ginia. (See page 12.) The number of special students admitted in 
any year will not be more than 10 % of the average of the numbers 
of the two preceding entering classes. Applications for permission 



280 West Virginia University 

to enter as special students should therefore be made in advance of 
the regular registration period. 

Special students may be admitted to the West Virginia bar only 
after having passed the State bar examination. 

STUDENTS IN OTHER COLLEGES. 

Students of at least junior standing in other colleges of the Uni- 
versity may be permitted to take work in the College of Law subject 
to the regulations of the College where they are registered and of 
the College of Law, but conditioned in each case upon the consent of 
the instructor giving the course which such student desires to take. 

ADMISSION TO COMBINED COURSE. 

A student may secure the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bach- 
elor of Laws in six years under the following regulation of the Col- 
lege of Arts and Sciences. 

Any candidate for the A.B. degree, who, at the end of the junior 
year has completed 96 semester hours and who has satisfied all other 
requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences for this degree, may 
in his senior year take the full first year of the law course, and upon 
completion of the same shall be entitled to receive the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts. But if a student has to his credit 92 semester hours 
at the end of his junior year, hie may, subject to the approval of the 
dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and the dean of the College 
of Law, be allowed to enter upon the first year of the work of the 
law course, in which case the degree shall be withheld until he attains 
four additional credit hours in the College of Arts and: Sciences. 
Such cases, 'however, shall be treated as exceptions and the student 
is urged to complete the entire 96 hours of required work in the Col- 
lege of Arts and Sciences before beginning the study of law. No 
student may substitute the first year of law as above provided, who 
shall have failed to maintain a uniform record of good scholarship 
to the end of his junior year in the College of Arts and Sciences. 

No work included in the above 96 credits and counted toward 
the A.B. degree may be again counted toward the LL.B. degree. 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING. 

Applicants for admission to advanced standing must satisfy the 
following requirements : 

1. Compliance with the requirements for admission to the first 
year class. 

2. For admission to the second year class, applicants must have 
successfully pursued the study of law in residence for at least one 



The College of Law 281 

year in an approved law school, where they have received credit for 
courses equivalent to those required for admission to the second year 
class in the College of Law. 

3. For admission to the third year class, applicants must have 
successfully pursued the study of law in residence for at least two 
years in an approved law school where they have received credit for 
courses equivalent to those required for admission to the third year 
class in the College of Law. 

No credit will be given for work done in a law office. 

No student may receive the degree of Bachelor of Laws without 
at least one year's residence in the University and the successful pass- 
ing of courses aggregating twenty-eight semester hours pursued in 
the College of Law. 

Any applicant for advanced standing may also, in the discretion 
of the law faculty, be required to undergo an examination in any or 
all subjects presented for advanced standing. 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS. 

Students who have less than twenty-two hours of law credit are 
classified as first year law students. 

Students who have twenty-two or more hours, but less than fifty 
hours of law credit are classified as second year students. 

Students who have fifty or more hours of law credit are classified 
as third year students. 

The classification under the above rules is made as of November 
1st of each year. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES. 

BACHELOR OF LAWS. 

Students who have satisfied the preparatory and college require- 
ments for entrance to the College of Law as candidates for the degree 
of bachelor of laws, and who have satisfactorily completed courses 
aggregating eighty-six hours, distributed over three years residence 
and who have otherwise satisfied the requirements of the University 
and of the College of Law, will be granted the degree of Bachelor of 
Laws. 

The eighty-six hours offered by a student for the degree of 
bachelor of laws must include the following courses: Contracts, Per- 
sonal property, Agency, Torts, Actions, Common law pleading, Crimi- 
nal law and procedure, Persons and domestic relations, Real proper- 
ty I, Real property II, Evidence, Equity jurisdiction I, Practice and 
procedure, and Practice court. 

A satisfactory record of attendance, or a valid excuse for non- 



282 West Virginia University 

attendance, at such special lectures as shall be arranged by the Col- 
lege of Law for the law students, is required of each candidate for the 
degree of Bachelor of Laws. 

Students who take military science after enrolling in the College 
of Law will be permitted to substitute two hours' credit in military 
science for two hours of law. 

ADMISSION TO BAR. 

Under the provisions of ch. 119, sec. 1, of the West Virginia Code, 
those who receive the degree of bachelor of laws from the West Vir- 
ginia University may be admitted to the bar without further exami- 
nation. 

Bar Examinations. 

All persons seeking admission to the West Virginia bar, except 
those who hold 'the degree of bachelor of laws from West Virginia 
University, are required to take 'and pass the State bar examination. 

The bar examinations are held at Charleston, commencing on the 
second Wednesday of March and of September. 

An order made and entered by the Supreme Court of Appeals on 
September 16, 1924, contains the following provision: 

"Until otherwise provided it is ordered, under Chapter 119, Sec- 
tion 1 of the Code, as follows: 

1. Persons applying, on and after July 1, 1928, for license to 
practice law in this .state under the provisions of Section 1, of Chap- 
ter 119 of the Code, must satisfy the following requirements as to 
period of study and degree of preparation: 

(1) A preliminary academic education equivalent to at least two 
years of study in a college. 

(2) Three years of diligent law study as a resident student in a 
law school certified by the Association of American Law iSchools as 
complying with the following standards: 

(a) It shall require its .students to pursue a course of three 
years' duration if they devote substantially all of their working time 
to their studies, and a longer course, equivalent in the number of 
working hours, if they devote only part of their working time to their 
studies. 

(b) It shall provide an adequate library, available for the use of 
the students. 

(c) It shall have among its teachers a sufficient number giving 
their entire time to the school to insure actual personal acquaintance 
and influence with the whole student .body. 

Graduation from such a school shall be evidenced bv a certificate 



The College of Law 283 

to the State Board of Law Examiners by the head of the school at 
which such study was pursued, showing in detail all the work done. 

(2) The following members of the Bar of the State shall consti- 
tute a State Board of Law Examiners, namely, John O. Henson, 
Robert S. Spilman, Joseph M. Sanders, James W. Ewing and J. W. 
Vandervort. They may select a competent secretary from their own 
number or from the outside. 

The said Board shall have the power to make all needful rules 
and regulations for the conduct of the examination* and shall make 
such examination equivalent in scope to that required for graduation 
from law schools which are members of the Association of American 
Law Schools. The Board shall issue a written certificate to each 
person who passes such examination. 

3. Persons applying, prior to July 1, 1928, for license to practice 
law in this state under the provisions of 'Section 1, of Chapter 119 of 
the Code, must satisfy the above requirements except in the follow- 
ing particulars: 

(a) A preliminary academic education equivalent to that required 
for graduation from a high school of the first class in West Virginia, 
which may be evidenced by a diploma of graduation from such a high 
school or by a certificate showing equivalent credits for adniission to 
West Virginia University, or by passing an examination on equivalent 
subjects, shall be accepted in lieu of two years of study in a college. 

(b) Three years of diligent law study as a student in the office 
of, and under the direction of, a member of the bar of this state 
(or another state) equivalent in character and scope to the study re- 
quired from a law school as above defined shall be accepted in lieu 
of study as a resident student in such a law school. 

4. Any person duly licensed to practice in another state, or in 
the District of Columbia, and who desires to be licensed as a resident 
practitioner in West Virginia, must first establish a residence in the 
state, but such residence need not have been maintained for any defi- 
nite period preceding an application for admission to the bar exam- 
ination. If any such applicant has engaged in the regular practice 
of law for five years or more in another state, or in the District of 
Columbia, the Board of Law Examiners may, in its discretion, accept 
such five years of law practice as being the equivalent of the prelim- 
inary academic and law studies above specified, but the applicant 
must give the information relating to his previous academic prepa- 
ration and law study called for in the application blank and must 
also furnish to the Board such information regarding his previous 
professional experience and practice as the Board may require. Any 
such applicant who has not been regularly engaged in the practice of 



284 West Virginia University 

law for five years or more must satisfy the preliminary academic and 
law study requirements above specified. 

Information as to bar examinations and as to other matters relat- 
ing to admission to the bar may be obtained upon inquiry directed 
to the Secretary, State Board of Law Examiners, Charleston, W. Va. 

WEST VIRGINIA LAW QUARTERLY. 

The West Virginia Law Quarterly is published in December, 
February, April and June by the faculty of the College of Law. It is 
the official publication of the West Virginia Bar Association. 

The editors of the Student Note and Recent Case Department of 
the Law Quarterly are members of the second and third year classes, 
who are chosen each year from those students who made the highest 
grades in the preceding year. This department affords to ambitious 
students an opportunity to do research work of a practical nature. 

STUDENT CLUB COURTS. 

A system of Club Courts, for the argument of law points arising 
out of statements of facts submitted by the members of the Faculty 
and others, is in operation in the College of Law. Membership in 
these clubs is voluntary, but an opportunity to join one of them is 
open to every student in the College of Law. The arguments are pre- 
sided over by members of the faculty, members of the bar in active 
practice, and senior law students. 

PRIZES. 

Awards for prizes in the University are made in accordance with 
the following rules: 

No composition, in whole or in part, shall be submitted in com- 
petition for two prizes. 

Only students pursuing courses leading to [baccalaureate degrees 
are eligible for any prize offered, except for the James F. Brown 
prize. 

No student shall be eligible to enter any contest who has not 
been a resident student in this University for at least one semester 
preceding the semester in which the contest is to be held, and who, 
unless he be a competitor for the James F. Brown prize is not a resi- 
dent student in good standing in the University in the semester in 
Which the contest is held. 

No successful contestant may become for a second time a com- 
petitor for the same prize. 

If in any contest the judges find no manuscript of sufficient 
merit, there shall be no award of the prize for that year. 

Students intending to compete in any essay-writing contest must 
notify the chairman of the Committee on Prizes not later than March 
15. Three typewritten copies of each essay must be in the hands of 
the chairman of the committee not later than May 15. 

The conditions upon which the awards in the several contests are 



The College of Law 285 

made may be learned upon application to the President's office, or to 
the members of the Committee on Prizes. 

The following University prizes are of peculiar interest to law 
students: 

The Bryan Prize in Political Science. 

The Hon. William J. Bryan has given a sum of money, the income 
of which is offered as a prize for the best essay on some subject in 
the science of government. The amount of this prize is $15.00. 

The Tax Commission Prize. 

The members of the State Tax Commission of 1902, W. P. Hub- 
bard, Henry G. Davis, John K. Thompson, L. J. Williams and J. H. 
Holt, have given the sum of $1,350, the income of which is to be used 
annually as a prize for the "best original work bearing on matters of 
taxation in West Virginia." The conditions of competition are deter- 
mined by the Council of Administration. The amount of the prize at 
present is $70.00. 

The James F. Brown Prize. 

In 1919 the late Mr. James F. Brown, of the Class of 1873, gave 
$5,000.00 to the University, the proceeds to be invested by it and the 
income used as a prize for the best essay each year on a subject con- 
cerning the privileges and immunities of citizens guaranteed by the 
Federal or State constitutions. The subject for the year 1925-26 will 
be as follows: "Freedom of the Press Under Our Constitutions." 

Students in the senior class and within one year after graduation 
are eligible to compete. 

The Cassell W. Mowrey Memorial Prize. 

Brooke's Inn of Phi Delta Phi offers a prize of $20.00 in gold to 
the member of the first-year class of the College of Law who attains 
the highest scholastic standing for the year. 

Only candidates for the LL.B. degree are eligible. 

The prize is in honor of the memory of Cassel W. Mowrey, who 
was a member of Brooke's Inn. 



286 West Virginia University 

UNIVERSITY FEES AND EXPENSES. 

.Students in- the College of Law are charged: 

A tuition fee of $25.00 a semester if residents of West Virginia, 
and $50.00 a semester if non-residents. 

A .contingent fee of $12.50 a semester. 

A student activity fee of $5.00 a semester. 

A medical fee of $2.50 a semester. 

A .diploma fee of $10.00, payable at the beginning of the semester 
in which the student expects to receive his degree. 

A fee of $2,00 each semester is charged for registration and the 
issuance of class cards. This fee is remitted to all students who 
procure class cards during the first three days of the first semester, 
and the first two days of the second semester. 

Refunding of Tuition Fees. 

Students who withdraw from the University for good and suffi- 
cient reasons during the first two weeks of the semester, will 'have 
their fees refunded upon making application to the President. 

COST OF A YEAR'S WORK. 

■Board and lodging may be obtained in Morgan-town for from 
$8.00 to $10.00 a week. Furnished rooms may be obtained at from 
$2.0€ to $3j50 a week for each tenant with two in a room. Board 
in private families or in students' boarding clubs costs from $6.00 
to $7.00 a week. A student's washing will cost usually from $10.00 
to $18:00 a year; his text books from $20.00 to $40.00 a year, and 
'his college fees $40.00 a year. Traveling expenses, clothing and 
miscellaneous expenses will depend largely upon the tastes and habits 
of the individual. In general it may be said that the legitimate 
cost of a nine months' term of residence at the University ranges 
from $400.00 to $650.00, exclusive of traveling expenses. 

Text-books are kept for sale in the University book store. The 
student librarians in the College of Law sell second hand law books, 
charging 10% commission. 

State cadets are furnished their stationery and text-books to the 
value of $10.00. 



The College of Law 287 

COURSES AND EXAMINATIONS. 

COURSES. 

All courses extend either throughout the entire year or through 
one semester. No credit will be given for less than an entire course 
except by special order of the faculty. Grades given at the end 
of the first semester in courses extending throughout the year are 
merely indicative of the quality of work done by the student to that 
point and do not give credit for the part of the course so far pur- 
sued. Such first semester grade may be considered in determining 
the final grade. Any student who fails in the first semester's work 
in any such course will not be permitted to continue that course. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

Students are required to take all regular examinations. No 
student who absents himself from any such examination without be- 
ing excused therefrom by the faculty of the College of Law, will re- 
ceive credit unless he repeats the course successfully. If absence from 
a final examination is permitted by the faculty, the student's grade in 
that course will be withheld until he has passed the next examination 
for the the removal of conditions in the course. Application for leave 
to be absent from a regular examination must be made before the 
hour at which such examination closes. 

Regular examinations are held at the end of each semester in 
all courses. The period devoted to such examinations and the length 
of time of each examination are determined by the faculty of the Col- 
lege of Law. 

Examinations for the Removal of Conditions are held during the 
seven days immediately following the day for mid-semester reports 
in the second semester and the seven days immediately following 
the opening of the University in the fall. No other special examina- 
tions are given. 

GRADES. 

Reports of students' grades are made at the end of each semester. 
If such grade be reported at the end of the course, it is the student's 
grade for the course; if at the end of the first semester in a course 
extending throughout the year, it is merely indicative of the quality 
of the student's work that far in the course. 

In determining grades the instructor gives such weight as he 
deems best to examinations, daily recitations, and attendance. He 
may refuse examination to any student because of poor attendance. 

The privilege of examination is denied a student absent for any 
cause, from 12% of the class periods of a course during the semester 



2#8 West Virginia University 

preceding the examination unless special permission is 'given him 
by the Committee on Classification and 'Grades on the recommendation 
of the dean of the college, and the instructor, to take such examina- 
tion. In all such cases the time lost must be made up by attendance 
at an approved law school -before the student will be recommended 
for a degree or before .his attendance will be certified to another law 
school. 

Students who fail in any course are given no credit for it. 

A student who is conditioned in any course will receive no credit 
for it unless he pass the next examination for removal of conditions 
in that subject, provided, however, that the faculty may require a 
student to complete certain supplementary work in lieu of such ex- 
amination or in addition thereto. 

The law faculty may warn any student whose work is deemed 
unsatisfactory, place him on probation or refuse his re-registration 
in the College of Law. 

METHOD OF INSTRUCTION. 

The work of the students is based chiefly upon the study and dis- 
cussion of 'decided cases, with collateral reading of statutes, approved 
text-books and periodicals, elucidated by free discussion in the class. 

COURSES IN PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE. 

Practice and Procedure. Instruction in practice and procedure is 
preparatory and supplementary to the work of the practice court, and 
is conducted by text-Jbock lectures and special study of the statutes 
and decisions governing West Virginia practice and procedure. At- 
tention is given to the jurisdiction and functions of the Supreme Court 
of Appeals, the Circuit, County and inferior Courts, and the powers, 
duties, and liabilities of attorneys at law as officers of the court. 
The statutes and decisions governing the purpose and use of special 
legal and equitable remedies, such as attachment, garnishment, statu- 
tory motions, injunctions, etc. receive careful attention. Attention 
is also given to the procedural phases of the extraordinary legal 
remedies, such as mandamus, habeas corpus, certiorari, quo warranto, 
prohibition, etc. 

Practice Court. The practice court exercises original jurisdiction 
in law, equity, criminal and probate cases, and appellate jurisdiction 
in appeals from inferior tribunals. 

Every third-year student, before receiving the bachelor's degree 
is required to prepare the pleadings and prosecute to judgment the 



The College of Law 289 

required number of cases in the practice court. The equivalent of at 
least five hours in each week during the second semester must be 
spent by each third-year student in participation in practice court 
work in the court room. 

Statements of facts are furnished, such as would be related to a 
lawyer in active practice by his client. Each student must determine 
whether or not upon such facts the particular case in hand is one of 
common law, equity, criminal or probate cognizance. He must then 
frame his pleadings, serve his summons or notice and answer his 
adversary's pleadings until issue is joined in legal manner, after which 
the case is brought on for hearing in strict accordance with settled 
legal procedure, witnesses are examined and cross-examined, and the 
case is conducted through all the various stages of trial or hear- 
ing down to and including the judgment, decree, or sentence, after 
which, should the case be appealed, it must be carried through the 
Supreme Court, involving the preparation of the record on appeal, 
briefs of counsel, etc. 

The clerk and his assistant are chosen from the student body, 
from whose ranks are also drawn a sheriff, jurors, and other officers, 
thus giving to the students the benefit of practice in administrative 
judicial machinery. The sessions are presided over by that member 
of the law faculty who has charge of practice courses and by circuit 
judges especially chosen for the work. The judges also lecture upon 
various subjects of interest to the students, and especially upon legal 
ethics. 

Drafting of Legal Instruments. Students are instructed in this 
course in the actual preparation of deeds, mortgages, wills, abstracts 
and opinions of title, assignments, contracts, partnership agreements, 
and other legal instruments, which a lawyer is called upon to prepare. 
Statements of facts are furnished to the class by the instructor in 
charge and each student is required to prepare the various forms of 
instruments. These are corrected by the instructor and are discussed 
and criticised in class. Careful consideration is given to special forms 
of execution and acknowledgement when one of the parties is a cor- 
poration, a partnership, a married woman, or the like. 



290 West Virginia University 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

The ^curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Laws covers 
a period of three academic years. The work of the first year is pre- 
scribed. All of the studies of the second year are elective except 
Common law pleading, Evidence, Real property II and Equity juris- 
diction I, and all of the third years courses except Practice and pro- 
cedure, and Practice court. Second year courses may be elected by 
third year students, but third year courses will not in general be 
open to second year students. A few subjects that are given only 
in alternate years may be elected by both second and third year stu- 
dents. All required courses are marked by an asterisk. 

It is expected that each student will carry fourteen hours of class 
room work per week during the first and second years and fifteen 
during the third. Not less than ' thirteen nor more than sixteen 
hours may be carried without special consent of the law faculty. 

PROGRAM OF COURSES FOR 1925-26. 1 
FIRST YEAR. 

* Actions. (2 Hrs.) Two hours a week in the first semester. 
Sunderland, Cases on Common Law Pleading and required readings. 
Professor Carlin. 

*Agexicy (Including Workmen's Compensation). (4 Hrs.) Two 
hours a week throughout the year. Wambaugh, Cases on Agency. 
Professor Hardman. 

^Contracts. (6 Hrs.) Three hours a week throughout the year. 
Williston, Cases on Contracts (2d ed.) Professor Snider. 

^Criminal Law and Procedure. (4 Hrs.) Four hours a week in 
the second semester. iMikell, Cases on Criminal Law and Criminal 
Procedure. Professor J. R. Trotter. 

* Personal Property. (2 Hrs.) Two hours a week in the first 
semester. Bigelow, Cases on Property, vol. 1. Professor J. R. 
Trotter. 

*Persons and Domestic Relations. (2 Hrs.) Two hours a week in 
the first semester. Smith, Cases on Persons. Professor Madden. 

*Real Property I. (2 Hrs.) Two hours a week in the second 
semester. Bigelow, Cases on Property, vol. 2. Professor Madden. 

*Torts. (6 Hrs.) Three hours a week throughout the year. 
Pound's Edition of Ames and Smith, Cases on Torts. Professor 
Dickinson. 

lThe program of courses as here given is subject to change. 



The College of Law 291 

SECOND YEAR. 

♦Common Law Pleading (Including Drafting of Pleadings). (4 
Hrs.) Four hours a week in the second semester. Sunderland, Cases 
on Common Law Pleading. Professor Carlin. 

[Damages. (2 Hrs.) Two hours a week in the second semester. 
Beale, Cases on Damages (2d ed.). Omitted in 1925-26 and in alter- 
nate years thereafter. Professor Dickinson.] 

*Equity Jurisdiction I. (4 Hrs.) Two hours a week throughout 
the year. Case book to be selected. Professor Snider. 

*Evidence. (4 Hrs.) Four hours a week in the first semester. 
Hinton, Cases on Evidence. Professor Hardman. 

Negotiable Instruments. (3 Hrs.) Three hours a week in the 
second semester. Smith and Moore, Cases on Bills and Notes (2d 
ed.) Professor Dickinson. 

*Real Property II. (4 Hrs.) Two hours a week throughout the 
year. Aigler's Cases on Property and Bigelow's Cases on Rights in 
Land. Professor Madden. 

Sales of Personal Property. (3 Hrs.) Three hours a week in 
the second semester. Woodward, Cases on Sales (2d ed.). Profes- 
sor J. R. Trotter. 

Trusts. (4 Hrs.) Four hours a week in the first semester. Scott, 
Cases on Trusts. Professor Madden. 

[Wills and Administration. (3 Hrs.) Three hours a week in the 
first semester. Costigan, Cases on Wills, Descent, and Administra- 
tion. Given 1925-26 and in alternate years thereafter. Professor 
J. R. Trotter.] 

See also the courses listed as third year courses but enclosed in 
brackets. All of these courses are open to second year students. 

THIRD YEAR. 

[Administrative Law. (2 Hrs.) Two hours a week in the second 
semester. Selected cases. Given in 1925-26 and in alternate years 
thereafter. Professor Hardman.] 

[Bankruptcy. (2 Hrs.) Two hours a week in the first semester. 
Williston, Cases on Bankruptcy (2d ed.). Given in 1925-26 and in 
alternate years thereafter. Professor Hardman.] 

Conflict of Laws. (4 Hrs.) Four hours a week in the first semes- 
ter. Beale, Cases on Conflict of Laws. Professor Dickinson. 



292 West Virginia University 

[Constitutional Law. (4 Hrs.) Two hours a week throughout 
the year. Case books to be selected. Given in 1925-26 and alternate 
years thereafter. Professor Snider.] 

Drafting Legal Instruments. (1 Hr.) One hour a week in the 
second semester. See page 17 for information as to the work in this 
course. Professor Carlin. 

[Equity Jurisdiction II. (2 Hrs.) Two hours a week in the sec- 
ond semester. Chafee, Cases on Equitable Relief Against Torts. 
Omitted in 1925-26 and in alternate years thereafter. Professor 
Snider.] 

Equity Pleading and Practice. (2 Hrs.) Two hours a week in 
the first semester. Shipman on Equity Pleading, or case book to be 
selected. Professor Carlin. 

[Insurance. (2 Hrs.) Two hours a week in, the second semester. 
Vance, Cases on Insurance. Given in 1925-26. Professor J. R. 
Trotter.] 

[Jurisprudence. (2 Hrs.) Two hours a week in the second 
semester. Lectures and required readings. Omitted in 1925-26 and 
in alternate years thereafter. Professor Hardman.] 

[Mining Law. ('2 Hrs.) Two hours a week in the second semes- 
ter. Selected cases on rights in coal, oil and gas. Given in 1925-26 
and in alternate years thereafter. Professor Madden.] 

[Municipal Corporations. (2 Hrs.) Two hours a week in the 
first semester. Beale, Cases on Municipal Corporations. Omitted 
in 1925-26 and in alternate years thereafter. Professor Hardman.] 

[Partnership. (3 Hrs.) Three hours a week in the first semes- 
ter. Gilmore, Cases on Partnership. Omitted in 1925-26 and in al- 
ternate years thereafter. Professor J. R. Trotter.] 

* Practice and Procedure. (4 Hrs.) Four hours a week in the 
first semester. Munson, Elementary Practice, selected cases, stat- 
utes and lectures. See page 18 for information as to work in this 
course. Professor Carlin. 

*Practice Court. (3 Hrs.) Court sessions and lecture periods in 
the second semester as specified by the faculty. See page 18 for in- 
formation as to work of the practice court. Professor Carlin and 
circuit court judges. 

Private Corporations. (4 Hrs.) Four hours a week in the first 



Tin: College op Law 293 

semester. Warren, Cases on Private Corporations. Professor J. R. 
Trotter. 

Public Utilities. (4 Hrs.) Four hours a week in the second 
semester. Burdick, Cases on Law of Public Service and Frankfur- 
ter, Cases under Interstate Commerce Act. Professor Hardman. 

[Quasi-Contracts. (3 Hrs.) Three hours a week in the second 
semester. Woodruff, Cases on the Law of Quasi-Contracts. Given 
in 1925-26 and in alternate years thereafter. Professor Dickinson.] 

[Real Property III. (4 Hrs.) Four hours a week in the second 
semester. Kales, Cases on Future Interests. Omitted in 1925-26 and 
in alternate years thereafter. Professor Madden.] 

[Suretyship. (2 Hrs.) Two hours a week in the first semester. 
Hening, Cases on Suretyship. Omitted in 1925-26 and in alternate 
years thereafter. Professor Snider.] 

[Use of Law Books. (1 Hr.) One hour a week in the second 
semester. Omitted in 1925-26 and in alternate years thereafter. 
Professor Dickinson.] 

COURSES IN COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES. 

History 43. International Law and Practice of Diplomacy. (2 
Hrs.) Open to third year men, and second year men who have had 
at least two years of pre-legal study. This course is taught by Pro- 
fessor Callahan of the Department of History. 

Public Speaking 14. Argumentation and Debate. (2 Hrs.) Two 
hours a week in either semester. 

Public Speaking 15. Advanced Argumentation and Debate. (2 
Hrs.) Two hours a week in the second semester. 

See University catalogue for information as to work in Public 
Speaking 14 and 15. These courses are given by Professor Kay of 
the Department of Public Speaking. 



The School of Medicine 



THE FACULTY. 

FRANK BUTLER TROTTER, A.M., LL.D., President of the Uni- 
versity. 

JOHN N. SIMPSON, M.D., Dean and Professor of Medicine 

MARTIN LOXLEY BONAR, M.D., Professor of Pharmacology 

SAMUEL JOHN MORRIS, M.D., Professor of Anatomy 

EDWARD JERALD VAN LIERE, B.A., M.S., M.D., Professor of 
Physiology 

IRVIN HARDY, M.S., MD., F.A.C.S., Professor of the Principles and 
Practice of Surgery 

GORDON ALGER BERGY, Ph.C, Professor of Pharmacy 

WILLIAM ADAMS SMITH, M.D., CM., Professor of Pathology and 
Bacteriology 

GIDEON STANHOPE DODDS, Ph.D., Associate Professor of His- 
tology and Embryology 

ROBB SPALDING SPRAY, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Bacter- 
iology 

GEORGE RUSSELL BANCROFT, Ph.D., Professor of Physiological 
Chemistry 

J. FRANK PEARCY, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physiology 

JOSEPH LESTER HAYMAN, Ph.C, Assistant Professor of Phar- 
macy 

CHARLES McCHESNEY BRAY, M.D., Instructor in Physical Diag- 
nosis 

CHARLES ROYAL KESSEL, M.D., Instructor in Physical Diagnosis 
and in charge of Student Health Service 

ELMER LIONEL HAMMOND, Ph.C, B.S., Pharm., Instructor in 
Pharmacy 

VIRGIL ROSS HERTZOG, Ph.G., Assistant in Pharmacology and 
Physiological Chemistry 

RAYMOND HAILE CURRY, B.S., Assistant in Pathology and 
Bacteriology 

RAYMOND EVAN BAILEY, B.S., Assistant in Anatomy 

HAROLD GLENN YOUNG, B.S., Assistant in Physiology 



296 West Virginia University 

INSTRUCTION IN MEDICINE. 

Regular instruction in subjects preparatory to the study of medi- 
cine was first given in West Virginia University in 1871, the "chair 
of anatomy, physiology, and hygiene," having been established in that 
year. A curriculum, covering the first two years of a standard four 
years' medical course was provided in 1902 and the work was placed 
in charge of the College of Medicine with a resident faculty of six 
men. I*n 1912 the College of Medicine became the School of Medicine. 
In reorganizing the work in medicine the Board of Regents retained 
the general character of the curriculum previously offered but pro- 
vided for a larger faculty, more laboratories and more edequate equip- 
ment. 

As at present constituted the West Virginia University School of 
Medicine has its own dean and faculty but confers no degrees in 
medicine. It is not affiliated with any other college or school of medi- 
cine and its students may go where they like to complete their medi- 
cal studies and receive the degree of M.D. 

The work in physical diagnosis and in introductory surgery is 
in charge of practicing physicians, members of the local medical 
profession. 

THE MEDICAL BUILDING. 

A three-story brick building furnishes room for the classes in 
medicine. . 

On the first floor are found the offices of the dean, the offices of 
the professors of pharmacology and physiological . chemistry, the 
pharmacological and physiological chemical laboratories, and a gen- 
eral lecture room. On the second floor are the laboratories for bac- 
teriology and pathology and two laboratories for physi- 
ology. On the third floor is a large laboratory for gross anatomy, 
one for histology, and one large lecture room. Each laboratory is 
provided with an abundance of light. There is an incinerating plant 
for the disposal of refuse. 



The School of Medicine 297 

STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE AND DISPENSARY. 

The University maintains a small hospital and dispensary in 
connection with the Student Health Service. This is in charge of a 
full time physician. Ambulatory patients are treated from nine to 
twelve o'clock and from two to five o'clock. On the first floor of the 
infirmary are the waiting rooms and the offices of the physician and 
the nurse. On the second floor is an isolation room where students 
having contagious disease may be isolated from other students and 
treated. Students not able to come to the infirmary will be treated 
at their homes. 

A three bed ward is maintained for the treatment of any student 
who may require treatment only for a day or two, or for any student 
needing hospital treatment who is unable to pay for hospital service. 
This is not to be construed as general hospital service for the student 
body, nor does the University render nursing service at the rooms of 
the students. The nurse is available only for such service as can be 
rendered at the infirmary. 

In case a student cannot communicate with the University physi- 
cian he is privileged to call another physician, the university paying 
for this first call, but this service must be terminated after the first 
call, unless the student wishes to pay for further service himself. 

The dispensary is open also to the city poor. 

LABORATORIES. 

ANATOMICAL LABORATORY. 

The anatomical laboratory is equipped with a Balopticon for doing 
projective work, a complete set of imported models of the brain and 
nervous system, eye, ear, thoracic and abdominal viscera, joints and 
muscles. There are frozen sections of the body for use in the study 
of regional anatomy. Each student in gross anatomy has the use of 
a complete skeleton and each student in histology is provided with a 
microscope. 

LABORATORY OF HISTOLOGY AND EMBRYOLOGY. 

The laboratory of histology and embryology has a modern equip- 
ment of microscopes and provides miscroscope illumination with day- 
light glass for dark days. Each student is assigned a loan set of 
slides covering the subject matter of the course. The laboratory has 
also a collection of models of embryos and certain histological struc- 
tures. A micro-projection apparatus is available. The preparation 
room is equipped with the necessary apparatus and reagents for mak- 
ing microscopic preparations. 



298 West Virginia University 

PATHOLOGICAL LABORATORY. 

The pathological laboratory is equipped with all necessary ap- 
paratus for general and special work, including parafme and celloidin 
microtomes, freezing microtomes, paraffine ovens, microscopes with 
oil immersion lenses, all necessary stains and chemicals. There is 
also a projection appartus with microscope attachment for demon- 
stration purposes. The department possesses a large collection of 
mounted microscopic sections representing all the pathological pro- 
cesses, and a museum of gross specimens. Surgical material is ob- 
tained from the city hospital. 

LABORATORY OF MEDICAL BACTERIOLOGY. 

The bacteriological laboratory is equipped with all necessary ap- 
paratus, such as sterilizers, incubators, glassware, etc. Each student 
has the use of a miscrope with oil immersion lens. Special appar- 
atus for bacteriological examination of air, water, milk, and blood is 
supplied to each student. Material for laboratory work in bacterio- 
logical diagnosis, such as Widal tests for typhoid, examination of 
sputum for tubercle baecilli, bacteriological examination of water, etc., 
is available. 

PHYSIOLOGICAL AND CHEMICAL LABORATORIES. 

The laboratories devoted to the work in physiology are supplied 
with tables, each accommodating two students who work together. 
Each table has a complete set of Harvard physiological apparatus 
which is lent to the student with a charge of breakage only. There 
are for general use kymographs, apparatus for work in blood pressure 
and blood counting, hemoglobinometers, charts and models. 

The physiological chemistry laboratory is large and well-equip- 
ped. There is a stock room and a laboratory for research in connec- 
tion with it. 

PHARMACOLOGICAL LABORATORY. 

The pharmacological laboratory is equipped with chemical desks, 
operating tables, and electrical kymograph and respiration apparatus 
for taking continuous records of respiration and blood pressure. Spe- 
cial animal cages are provided to meet the needs of courses 1 and 2. 
In addition, a special animal house for the proper care of experi- 
mental material is provided. Aside from the general equipment of 
the laboratory, each group of two students is provided with indi- 



The School of Medicine 299 

vidual sets of apparatus and reagents. The laboratory is also pro- 
vided with a collection of crude drugs, alkaloids, glucosides, and ana- 
lytical chemicals. 

The chemical, botanical, and zoological laboratories of the Uni- 
versity are also open to students in the School of Medicine. 

LIBRARY AND READING ROOM. 

The medical library consists of over 3500 bound volumes and 
many bound journals and reprints. There is a good collection of 
works on chemistry, anatomy, physiology, pharmacy, zoology, botany, 
pathology, bacteriology, pharmacology, medicine and surgery. There 
are bound volumes of the leading scientific journals as well as many 
of the leading German, French and American journals devoted to the 
laboratory side of medicine. The medical library occupies a separate 
room on the first floor of the library building. It is open from 
8:00 a. m. to 10:00 p. m. In addition each department has its own 
collection of books for the use of instructors and students. 

TUITION AND FEES. 

Students in the School of Medicine who are residents of the State 
are required to pay a tuition fee of $25.00 a semester. For students 
not residents of the State the fee is $100.00 a semester. All students 
must pay the following additional fees each semester: Contingent 
fee, $15.00; iStudent Activity fee, $5.00; Medical fee, $2.50. A diploma 
fee of $10.00 is payable by each student at the beginning of the 
semester in which he expects to graduate. The total is $95.00 per 
year for residents: $245.00 for non-residents. 



300 



West Virginia University 



ADMISSION TO THE COURSE IN MEDICINE. 

SECONDARY SCHOOL CREDITS. 

For admission to the course jn medicine the student must have 
credit for 'fifteen units of secondary school work, i. e., the work of 
the standard four-year high school. 

A. The following groups are required: 

(1) Three or four units of English. 1 

(2) Two units in mathematics: one in algebra and one in 
plane geometry. 

(3) Two units in Latin. 

(4) One unit of history. 

(5) Six units elective. 

B. Work in the following subjects not to exceed the number of 

units placed after each suBject will be accepted. 



English 


4 units 


Science 3 








Physics 


1 unit 


Foreign languages 2 




Chemistry 


1 unit 


Latin 


4 units 


Biology 


1 unit 


Greek 


3 units 


[Botany 


1 unit 


French 


3 units 


Geology 


1 unit 


German 


3 units 


Zoology 


1 unit 


Spanish 


2 units 


General science 


1 unit 


Italian 


2 units 


Physical geography 


V2 unit 






Physiology 


V2 unit 


Mathematics 




Hygiene and sanita- 




Algebra 


IVz units 


tion 


V2 unit 


Plane geometry 


1 unit 


Vocational subjects (not to ex- 


Solid geometry 


V2 unit 


ceed four units in all) 




Trigonometry 


Y2 unit 


Agriculture 


3 units 






Household arts 


3 units 


History and economics 




Manual training- 


3 units 


History 


3 units 


Bo okkeeping or book 




Civics 


1 unit 


keeping and commer- 




Elementary economics 


; 1 unit 


cial arithmetic 


2 units 


Sociology 


1 unit 


Shorthand and type- 








writing 


2 units 


Education 


2 units 


Commercial geography V2 unit 






Commercial law 


V2 unit 


Drawing 








Free-hand drawing 


1 unit 


Music: — violin, organ or 




Mechanical drawing 


1 unit 


piano 4 


2 units 



1 Students who present only three units of English for entrance are required to 
elect six hours of college English in addition to the minimum number of hours in 
that subject required for their degree. 

2Not less than two units of one foreign language will be accepted for entrance 
unless sufficient additional work in that language is taken in college to complete a 
minimum of two units. 

3A group of two or three units in science may be made by combining one unit 
each of any 2 of the following : physics, chemistry, biology, botany, zoology, geology. 

4For conditions governing credit work in music see the announcements of the 
School of Music. 



The School of Medicine 301 

COLLEGE CREDITS. 

In addition to the fifteen units of secondary school credit as listed 
on the preceding page, the student must have credit for sixty-four 
hours' work done either in the College of Arts and Sciences of West 
Virginia University or in another institution of equal grade. 

In accordance with the regulations of the American Medical Asso- 
ciation and the Association of American Medical Colleges a schedule 
covering two years of premedical college work has been laid down as 
shown on pages 9 and 10. 

CONDITIONAL ADMISSION. 

Under no circumstances will students be admitted to the course 
in medicine without having completed fifteen units of secondary school 
work and sixty hours of college work, including the subjects marked 
with an asterisk in the schedule, which are required by the American 
Medical Association; but students who lack the remaining four hours 
of college work may be admitted to the course conditionally and must 
find opportunity to remove the condition in the Summer School or else- 
where before enrolling for the second year in the School of Medicine. 

THE COMBINED B.S. AND M.D. COURSE. 

A student who desires to prepare himself for the practice of 
medicine and who has satisfied the requirements for entrance to the 
freshman class of the College of Arts and Sciences may matriculate 
in the College of Arts and Sciences and announce his intention of 
taking a combined scientific and medical course. After removing all 
entrance conditions and completing sixty-four hours (two years) of 
work in this college he may enter upon the two years course of the 
School of Medicine. On the completion of the course of this School 
he will receive the degree of Bachelor of Science. He may then 
enter a standard medical college, complete its course and receive the 
degree of Doctor of Medicine. His college and medical course to- 
gether will in this case usually occupy six years. 

The courses required in the College of Arts and Sciences and in 
the School of Medicine are indicated in the following schedule: 



302 



West Virginia University 



Courses in the College of Arts and Sciences. 
First Year' First Semester. First Year — Second Semester 



* English 1 
English 26 

♦Chemistry 1 

* Zoology 1 
German or French 
Military science 



17 



♦English 2 
English 27 

♦Chemistry 2 

♦Zoology 2 
German or French 2 
Military science 



3 
2 

4 
4 
3 
1 17 



(Second Year — First Semester. Second Year — Second Semester 



* Physics 1 

* Physics 2 
Chemistry 18 
Elective 5 
Chemistry 32 
Military science 



3 
1 
3 
5 
2 
1 15 



♦Physics 3 
♦Physics 4 

Philosophy 
♦Chemistry 36 

Elective 

Military science 



Courses in the School of Medicine. 
Junior Year — First Semester. 



3 
1 
3 
6 
2 
1 16 



COURSE 



Hours a Week 



Hours a Semester 



Lect. Lab. Led. 



Lab. 



Total 



PERIODS 



Physiological 
Chemistry 1 



Histology 4 
Anatomy 1 

Bacteriology 5 

Neurology 3 

Embryology 5 



Anatomy 2 
Physiology 2 



Pharmacology 1 



3 10 54 



36 



A. Lab., M. Th., 8-12 
180 234 S. 8-10 

B. Lab., T. F., 8-12 
S. 11-1 

Lect. W., 9 and 12, S. 10 5 

144 180 A. Lab. T. F., 8-12 
B. Lab., M. Th., 8-12 
Lect. W., 8 and 11 5 

195 267 M. T. W. Th. F., 2-5 7 



4 11 72 

Junior Year — Second Semester 

2 8 36 144 180 A. Lalb., M. T. Th., 10-12 
W. 11-1 
B., T. W. Th. F., 8-10 

Lect., M. 8, F. 11 5 

2 4 36 72 108 A. Lab., W. F. 8-10 
B. Lab., M. 10-12 

W. 11-1 
Lect., M. 9, F. 10 3 

2 4 36 72 108 A. Lab., T. Th. 8-10 

B. Lab. T. Th. 10-12 

Lect., T. Th. 2 3 

3 6 54 108 162 M. F., 2-5, W., 3-6 5 

1 3 18 54 72 A. Lab., T. 3-6; B. Lab., Th. 

3-6. 

Lect., W. 2 2 

3 54A. Lab,, T. 3, Lab,, 

Th. 3 1 



The School of Medicine 



303 



Senior Year — First Semester. 



COURSE 



Hours a Week 



Hours a Semester 

Lab. Led. Lab. Total 



PERIODS 



Pathology 1 3 

Physiology 3 5 

Pharmacology 3 3 

Hygiene 6 2 

Pathology 2 1 
Pharmacology 2 



Pharmacology 4 3 

Introductory 

Surgery 1 3 

Applied 

Anatomy 6 2 

Physical 

Diagnosis 1 2 



Theoretical 
Medicine 2 



8 54 144 198 A. Lab., M. W. 2, F. 3 
B. Lab., T. Th. 2, F. 10 

Lect., M. T. Th. 10 6 

6 90 108 198 A. Lab., T. Th. 2-6:00 
B. Lab., M. W. 2-5:00 

Lect., M. T. W. Th. F. 9 7 

54 54 Lect., Rec, T. Th. 11 

F 2 5 

36 36 Lect., M. W. 11 2 

Senior Year — Second Semester. 

90 



18 



54 
54 
36 
36 



90 



108 A. Lab., M. 2, T. 3 

B. Lab., W. 2, Th. 3 

Lect., M. 9 3 

90 A. Lab., M. 2 

B. Lab., W. 2 

Rec. A. & B., Th. 10-12 2 

54 Lect., M. T. 10, W. 11 3 

54 Lect. T. W. 9, F. 10 3 



36 



36 Lect. T. Th. 2 2 

A. Lab., F. 8-10 
72 B. Lab., F. 8-10 

Lect., M. F. 11 2 



36 A. Sec, T. 3-5 

B. Sec. Th. 3-5 1 

Lect., T. 11:00 1 



1 36 

Physiology 4 1 18 18 

Third and Fourth Years. 

To be taken at an approved school or college of medicine. 

NOTE: — Medical students must take their work in sequence as 
shown in the schedule. If they fail in a course they may go on in the 
following year but the course must be taken again at the first oppor- 
tunity. 



304 West Virginia University 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

ANATOMY. 

Professor S. J. Morris, Associate Professor Dodds and Mr. Bailey. 

1. Gross Anatomy. (7 Hrs.) Required of all first-year medical 
students. Lectures and recitations 72 hours; laboratory 195 hours. 

First semester; 2:00-5:00; Professor Morris and Mr. Bailey. 

2. Gross Anatomy. (3 Hrs.) Required of all first-year medical 
students. Continuation of course 1. Lectures 54 hours; laboratory 
128 hours. 

Second semester; M. F., 2:00-6:00; W., 3:00-6:00; Professor 
Morris and Mr. Bailey. 

3. Neurology. (3 Hrs.) Required of all first-year medical stu- 
dents. Lectures 36 hours; laboratory 72. Prerequisite: Histology. 

Second semester; lectures, M. 9:00, F. 10:00; laboratory, sec. A 
W. F., 8:00-10:00; sec. B. M., 10:00-12:00; W., 11:00-1:00; Profes- 
sor Morris and Mr. Bailey. 

4. Histology. (5 Hrs.) Required of all first-year medical stu- 
dents. Lectures 36 hours; laboratory 144 hour*. 

First semester; lectures W. 8:00 and 11:00; laboratory, sec. A, 
T., F., 8:00-12:00; sec. B, M., Th. 8:00-12.00. Associate Professor 
Dodds and Mr. Bailey. 

5. Embryology. (3 Hrs.) Required of all first year medical 
students. Prerequisite: Histology. Lectures 36 hours; laboratory 
72 hours. 

Second semester; lectures T., Th., 2:00; laboratory, sec. A, T., 
Th. 8:00-10:00; sec. B, T.. Th. 10:00-12:00; Associate Professor 
Dodds and Mr. Bailey. 

6. Applied Anatomy. (2 Hrs.) Required of all second-year 
medical students. Lectures 36 hours; laboratory 36 hours. Prerequi- 
site: Anatomy 1 and 2. 

Second semester; T., Th., 2:00; Professor Morris. 

107. Advanced Histology. (2 Hrs.) Open to advanced and grad- 
uate students. Laboratory work and study of current literature on 
the subject. 

Hours to be arranged; Associate Professor Dodds. 

108. Advanced Embryology. (2 Hrs.) Open to advanced and 
graduate students. 

Hours to be arranged; Associate Professor Dodds. 

109. Advanced Anatomy. Open to advanced and graduate stu- 
dents. 

Credit and hours to be arranged; Professor Morris. 

110. Anatomy of the Eye, Ear audi Nose. (2 Hrs.) Open to ad- 
vanced and graduate students. 

Hours to be arranged; Professor Morris. 



The School of Medicine 305 

PATHOLOGY AND BACTERIOLOGY. 

Professor Smith, Associate Professor Spray and Mr. Curry. 

1. General Pathology. (6 Hrs.) Required of second year med- 
ical students. Lectures, demonstrations, and laboratory work. Pre- 
requisites: physiological chemistry, histology, physiology, anatomy, 
and bacteriology. (21). 

First semester; lectures (54 hrs.) M., T., Th., 10:00; laboratory 
(144 hrs.), M., W., F., 2:00-5:00 or T., Th., 2:00-5:00 and F., 10:00. 
Professor Smith and Mr. Curry. 

2. Pathology of Infectious Granulomas and Tumors. (3 Hrs.) 
Required of second year medical students. Continuation of Pathology 
21. Lectures, recitations, and laboratory work. Prerequisite: Path- 
ology 1. (22). 

Second semester; lectures (18 hrs.) M., 9:00; laboratory (90 
hrs.) M., 2:00-5:00 and T., 3:00 or W., 2:00-5:00 and Th.,*3:00. 
Professor Smith and Mr. Curry. 

3. Laboratory Diagnosis. (2 Hrs.) A laboratory course in 
blood, gastric contents, etc., and their pathologic and clinical sig- 
nificance. Prerequisite: Bacteriology 6 and Physiological Chemis- 
try 1. Elective. (11). 

Second semester; lecture (18 hrs.) F. 3:00; laboratory (36 hrs.), 
4:00-6:00; Professors Smith and Bancroft. 

4. State and Municipal Laboratory Methods. (2 Hrs.) Open to 
second year students. Prerequisite: Bacteriology 5 or its equivalent. 
(7). 

Hours to be arranged; Professor Smith. 

5. Medical Bacteriology. (5 Hrs.) Required of first year med- 
ical students. (3). 

Second semester; lectures, (36 hrs.) M. 8:00; F. 11:00; labora- 
tory, (144 hrs.) Sec. A, M., T., Th., 10:00 to 12:00: Sec. B„ T., Th., 
F., 10:00 to 12:00; Associate Professor Spray and Mr. Curry. 

6. Hygiene. (2 Hrs.) Required of second year medical stu- 
dents. (5). 

First semester; lectures (36 hrs.) M., W., 11:00; Associate Pro- 
fessor S'RAY. 



306 West Virginia University 

PHARMACOLOGY. 
Professor Bonar, Professor Bancroft and Mr. Hertzog. 

1. Chemical Pharmacology. (1 Hr.) Three hours per week (54 
Hrs.) (40). 

Second semester; two sections, T. and Th., 3:00; Mr. Hertzog. 

2. Pharmacodynamics. (2 Hrs.) For second year medical stu- 
dents. Five hours per week (90 Hrs.) (41). 

Second semester; M. and W., 2:00; two sections', Th., 10:00- 
12:00. Conferences and demonstrations. Professor Bonar, Professor 
Bancroft and Mr. Hertzog. 

3. Systematic Pharmacology. (3 Hrs.) For second year med- 
ical students. Three hours per week (:54 Hrs.) (43). 

First semester; T. and Th., 11:00 and F., 2:00; Professor Bonar. 

4. Systematic Pharmacology. (3 Hrs.) Continuation of course 
3. Three hours per week (54 Hrs.) (43). 

Second semester; M., T., 10:00; W., 11:00; Professor Bonar 
and Professor Bancroft. 

11. Bio- Assay. (Credit according to work done.) Open to pro- 
perly qualified students. Special pharmacodynamics. 

Hours to be arranged; Professor Bonar and Mr. Hertzog. 

12. Toxicology. (2, Hrs.) A special course devoted to the study 
of the methods — chemical and biological — of detecting poisons of 
medico-legal interest. Prerequisite: Pharmacology 1 and 2. (Total 
72 Hrs.) (45). 

First semester; T., Th., 9:00-11:00; Professor Bonar and Pro- 
fessor Bancroft. 

13. Pharmacology Research. Problems open to specially inter- 
ested students with proper qualifications. (48). 

Hours to be arranged; Professor Bonar. 

PHYSIOLOGY. 

Professor Van Liere, Associate Professor Pearcy and Mr. Young. 

1. Physiology. (2 Hrs.) Elementary course for pharmacy stu- 
dents. 

Second semester; lectures and laboratory. See announcement in 
Pharmacy bulletin. Professor Van Liere and Mr. Young. 



The School of Medicine 307 

2. Physiology. (2 Hrs.) Physiology of muscle, nerves, and 
blood. 

Second semester; lectures, W., 2:00; laboratory, Sec. A, T., 3:00- 
6:00; Sec. B, Th., 3:00-6:00. Professor Van Liere and Mr. Young. 

3. Physiology. (7 Hrs.) Physiology of circulation, respiration, 
digestion, metabolism, secretion, central nervous system and special 
senses. 

First semester; lectures, M., T., W., Th., F., 9:00-10:00; labora- 
tory, Sec. A, M., W., 2:00-5:00; Sec. B, T., Th., 2:00-5:00; Professor 
Van Liere, Associate Professor Pearcy and Mr. Young. 

4. Physiology. (1 Hr.) Physiology of internal secretion. (7). 
Lectures T., 11:00; Associate Professor Pearcy and Professor Van 
Liere. 

5. Physiology. Pathological physiology. 
Hours to be arranged. Not given in 1925-26. 

6. Physiology. Research in physiology. 

Hours and credit to be arranged; Professor Van Liere and Asso- 
ciate Professor Pearcy. 

7. Obstetrics. (2 Hrs.) Introductory course in obstetrics. Elec- 
tive. 

Second semester; lecture 36 hours, W., 11:00; F., 2:00; Professor 
Van Liere. 

PHYSIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY. 

Professor Bancroft and Mr. Hertzog. 

1. Physiological Chemistry. (6 Hrs.) (10). 

Lectures, 54 hours; laboratory 180 hours; section A, M , F., 8:00- 
12:00; S., 8:00-10:00; section B, T., F., 8:00-12:00; S., 11:00-1:00; 
lectures, W., 9:00 and 12:00; S., 10:00. Professor Bancroft and 
Mr. Hertzog. 

2. Advanced Physiological Chemistry. The separation and puri- 
fication of various products of biochemical interest. Prerequisite, 
Course 1. 

Professor Bancroft. 



308 West Virginia University 

MEDICINE. 

- Dean Simpson, Dr. Bray and Dr. Kessel. 

1. Physical Diagnosis. (2 Hrs.) Required of second year med- 
ical students. An introductory course in the study of the taking of 
medical histories, and the examination of patients. (31) 

Second semester; lectures, M., F., 11:00; laboratory, F., 8:00- 
10:00; section A, Dr. Bray; section B, Dr. Kessel. 

2. Theoretical Medicine. (1 Hr.) Recitations upon the more 
common diseases with the application of the principles taught in 
course 1. (32) 

Second semester; section A, T, 3:00-5:00; section B, Th., 3:00- 
5:00; Dean Simpson. 

INTRODUCTORY SURGERY. 

Dr. Hardy. 

1. Surgery and Operative Technique. (3 Hrs.) Required of 
second year medical students. Open to graduate students. 

Second semester; T., W., F., 9:00; Dr. Hardy, City Hospital. 

2. Operative Surgery. A course of practical instruction in 
operative surgery utilizing the lower animals as subjects. Elective. 

Second semester; Saturdays, 9:00-12:00; Professor S. J. Morris. 



The Department of Pharmacy 
School of Medicine 



THE FACULTY. 

FRANK BUTLER TROTTER, A.M,. LL.D., President 

JOHN NATHAN SIMPSON, M.D., Dean of The School of Medicine 

GORDON ALGER BERGY, Ph.C., M.S., Professor of Pharmacy 

J. LESTER HAYMAN, Ph.C, B.S., Assistant Professor of Pharma- 
cognosy 
ELMER L. HAMMOND, Ph.C., M.S., Instructor in Pharmacy 

FRIEND EBENEZER CLARK, B.S., Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry 

PERRY DANIEL STRAUSBAUGH, B.S., Ph.D., Professor of 
Botany 

ROBERT ALLEN ARMSTRONG, A.M., L.H.D., Professor of English 
Language and Literature 

JOHN ARNDT EIESLAND, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics 

GEORGE RUSSELL BANCROFT, Ph.D., Associate Professor of 
Physiological Chemistry 

ENOCH HOWARD VICKERS, A.M., Professor of Economics and 
Sociology 

ROBERT CAMERON COLWELL, Ph.D., Professor of Physics 

EDWARD JERALD VAN LIERE, M.S., M.D., Professor of Physi- 
ology 

ROBERT SPALDING SPRAY, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Bac- 
teriology 



310 West Virginia University 

ESTABLISHMENT OF THE DEPARTMENT. 

In response to the request of the West Virginia State Pharma- 
ceutal Association the Board of Regents in 1914 made provision for 
instruction in pharmacy. A department of pharmacy was established 
in the School of Medicine and a two-year course in pharmacy leading 
to the professional degree of Graduate in Pharmacy (Ph:G.) was 
offered. 

In 1917 additional courses of three and four years, leading- to 
the degrees of Pharmaceutal Chemist (PhjC) and Bachelor of Science 
in Pharmacy (B:S. Pharmacy) were established. The course leading 
to the Ph.G. degree was discontinued July 1, 1924. The degree of 
Pharmaceutical Chemist given for three years of pharmaceutical 
work is recognized by such State Boards of Pharmacy as require a 
course in pharmacy preliminary to examination for registration. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PRACTICE OF PHARMACY 
IN WEST VIRGINIA. 

In order to be licensed as a pharmacist in West Virginia the 
candidate must present to the iState Board of Pharmacy satisfactory 
evidence that he has completed the following requirements: 

1. The applicant shall be not less than twenty-one years of age 
and a citizen of the United States. 

2. He must present evidence of the completion of fifteen units 
of secondary school education, i. e., graduation from a standard four- 
year high school or its equivalent. 

3. He must be a •graduate from a recognized school of phar- 
macy holding membership ih the American Conference of Pharma- 
ceutical Faculties, with the degree of Graduate in Pharmacy. (The 
higher degrees of Pharmaceutical Chemist and Bachelor of Science 
in Pharmacy are accepted 1 in lieu of the degree of Graduate in Phar- 
macy.) 

4. He must present satisfactory evidence that he has had thirty 
months' experience in pharmacy under the instruction of a licensed 
pharmacist. 

5. He must pass a satisfactory examination by or under the 
direction of the State Board of Pharmacy. 

In order to be licensed as an assistant pharmacist the candi- 
date must present to the State Board of Pharmacy satisfactory evi- 
dence that he has completed the following requirements : 

1. The applicant shall not be less' than eighteen years of age. 

2. He must have credit for fifteen units of secondary school 
work. 

3. He shall have not less than twenty-four months' experience 
in pharmacy under the instruction of a licensed pharmacist, provided 
however, that in case of a person who has attended a recognized 
school or college of pharmacy the actual time of attending such 
school or college of pharmacy may 'be deducted from the time of 
experience required, but in no case shall less than six months' store 
experience be accepted. 

4. The applicant must pass a satisfactory examination by or 
under the direction of the State Board of Pharmacy. 



The Department of Pharmacy 311 

LABORATORIES AND EQUIPMENT. 

The Department of Pharmacy has spacious quarters in Woodburn 
Hall. The equipment for all of the courses offered in the department 
is complete and of the latest design. 

PHARMACEUTICAL LABORATORIES. 

The pharmaceutical laboratories are fully equipped for the manu- 
facture of pharmaceutical preparations and for the performance of 
pharmaceutical, alkaloidal, and toxicological analysis. There are two 
well-lighted laboratories approximately thirty feet square. All drugs 
and chemicals required in the manufacture of pharmaceutical prep- 
arations are preserved in glass containers labeled according to the 
nomenclature of the Pharmacopeia and National Formulary, and 
conveniently located on shelves accessible to all students in the lab- 
oratory. One laboratory is especially fitted for instruction in manu- 
facturing pharmacy. It is equipped with a multi-speed centrifuge, 
with interchangeable heads and trunnion carriers and a bronze bas- 
ket and copper drip can for drying crystalline salts, a power driven 
force feed ointment mill, for the preparation of heavy ointments, 
paints, tooth pastes and other similar preparations, a pony mixer 
for the preparation of pastes and creams, a pill mass mixer, a knead- 
ing machine, a compressed tablet machine with full set of dies, pill 
and tablet coating machine, with polishing pan, a drug mill, a ball 
mill, a rapid sifter with complete set of sieves for the preparation 
of conspergents and insufflations, and a beater and emulsifying ma- 
chine for the preparation of lotions, liniments and emulsions of all 
types. There is a hand-operated piping and troche machine, pressure 
suppository machine, tablet triturate and hypodermic tablet machine 
and plates, gelatine coating apparatus, a laboratory drug mill, elec- 
tric drying oven, and konseal and capsule filling machines. 

A prescription laboratory is operated in conjunction with the Dis- 
pensary of the University Health Service. Each student is supplied 
with a full set of pharmaceutical apparatus and glassware necessary 
for the compounding of prescriptions. Torsion balances, encased in 
glass are a part of this regular equipment. 

THE MUSEUM OF PHARMACOGNOSY. 

The pharmacognosy collection consists of approximately four 
hundred medicinal plants secured from all parts of the world for in- 
struction in materia medica. For instructional purposes several 
large collections have been arranged. These are (a) a large display 
collection, (b) a labeled collection for student study, (c) an unlab- 
eled collection for identification, (d) a collection of powdered drugs 



312 West Virginia University 

for the purpose of histological study. The museum is provided with 
floor cases, tables, charts, maps, photographs and compound micro- 
scopes. 

LABORATORY OF MEDICAL BACTERIOLOGY. 

The bacteriological laboratory is equipped with all necessary ap- 
paratus, such as sterilizers, incubators., glassware, etc. Each student 
has the use of a microscope with oil immersion lens. Special ap- 
paratus for bacteriological examination of air, water, milk, and blood 
is supplied to each student. Material for laboratory work in bacter- 
iological diagnosis, such as Widal tests for typhoid, examination of 
sputum for tubercle bacilli, bacteriological examination of water, etc., 
is available. 

PHARMACOLOGICAL LABORATORY. 

The pharmacological laboratory is equipped with chemical desks, 
operating tables, and electrical kymograph and respiration apparatus 
for taking continuous records of respiration and blood pressure. 
In addition, a special animal house for the proper care 
of experimental material is provided. Aside from the general equip- 
ment of the laboratory, each group of two students is provided with 
individual sets of apparatus and reagents. The laboratory is also 
provided with a collection of crude drugs, alkaloids, glucosides, and 
analytical chemicals. 

PHYSIOLOGY LABORATORIES. 

The laboratories devoted to physiology on the first floor of the 
medical building are supplied with tables each accommodating two 
students. Each table is equipped with a complete set of general phy- 
siological apparatus which is lent to the students with a charge for 
breakage. Special apparatus is supplied from the storeroom to indi- 
vidual groups as needed. Sufficient equipment is provided to enable 
the students to perform all the experiments listed in standard labora- 
tory manuals and for the demonstration by instructors of experi- 
ments which cannot be conveniently performed by the student. 

Private rooms and equipment for research are provided for mem- 
bers of the department. 



The Department op Pharmacy 313 

PHYSIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORIES. 

The physiological chemistry laboratories are situated upon the 
second floor of the medical building and consist of a students' labora- 
tory, containing the usual equipment of desks, hood, etc., the depart- 
mental office with reference library and a research laboratory beyond 
this. An individual research room is provided for the assistant in the 
department. A dark-room is available for work requiring its use, 
as in polariscope work, etc. 

OTHER LABORATORIES. 

The laboratories of the departments of botany, chemistry, and 
physics in the College of Arts and Sciences are also open to students 
in the department of pharmacy. 

LIBRARY AND READING ROOM. 

The medical library consists of over 3200 bound volumes and 
many unbound journals and reprints. There is a good collection of 
works on chemistry, anatomy, physiology, pharmacy, zoology, botany, 
pathology, bacteriology, pharmacology, medicine, and surgery. There 
are bound volumes of the leading scientific journals as well as some 
of the leading German, French and American Journals devoted to the 
laboratory side of medicine. The general library is in close proxim- 
ity to the medical laboratories and is open all day and till ten o'clock 
at night. 

DISPENSARY AND MEDICAL SERVICE. 

All students in the University pay a medical fee of $2.50 each 
per semester, in return for which they receive drug service from 
the department of pharmacy and medical attention including minor 
surgery (specialties excepted) from Student Health Service. 

A clinic for out patients is conducted toy the physicians of the 
medical faculty. This service is rendered free to the poor of the 
immediate vicinity. The prescriptions are compounded at the dis- 
pensary of the Health Service Pharmacy by advanced students of 
the department of pharmacy under the supervision of a registered 
pharmacist. 



314 West Virginia University 

PHARMACEUTAL ASSOCIATIONS. 

The West Virginia Branch of the American 
Pharmaceutical Association. 

The headquarters of the West Virginia Branch of the American 
Pharmaceutical Association are at Morgantown. This branch of the 
national organization is composed of the representative pharmacists 
of West Virginia. iStudents of pharmacy are eligible to membership 
in the branch and are privileged to attend the lectures and meetings 
without becoming members. Address communications to A. B. Berry, 
Secretary, Morgantown, W. Va. 

The West Virginia State Pharmaceutical Association. 

Students of pharmacy are eligible to membership in this organi- 
zation, which has for its object the improvement of the science and 
art of pharmacy, the inculcation of the professional spirit and the re- 
striction of the practice of pharmacy to persons properly qualified by 
education and experience to exercise their art with safety to the 
public. Address communications to Roy B. Cook, Charleston, W. Va. 

American Conference of Pharmaceutical Faculties. 

The Department of Pharmacy holds membership in the American 
Conference of Pharmaceutical Faculties. The object of the Confer- 
ence is to promote the interests of the pharmaceutical education and 
all institutions holding membership in the same must maintain cer- 
tain minimum requirements for entrance and graduation. Through 
the influence of this conference higher standards of education have 
been adopted from time to time and the fact that several states by 
law or by Board ruling recognize the standards of the Conference is 
evidence of this influence. 

Pharmacists' Register. 

A pharmacists' register for the benefit of both the employer and 
employee has been established by the Department of Pharmacy. No 
charge is made for services rendered. 



The Department of Pharmacy 315 

Tuition and Fees. 

All students in the courses in pharmacy who are residents of 
West Virginia must pay a tuition fee of $25.00 a semester. Non- 
resident students must pay $100.00 a semester. In addition to the 
tuition fee each student must pay each semester: Contingent fee, 
$12.50; Student activity fee.. $5.00; Medical fee, $2.50. A diploma fee 
of $10.00 is payable by each student at the beginning of the semester 
in which he expects to graduate. 

Regulations Concerning Absences. 

A student who has seven or more unexcused absences in any 
semester is suspended from the University unless restored to good 
standing by action of the dean of his college. If his absences in any 
one course exceed 129c of the total number of recitations in that 
course he is barred from the final examination in that course unless 
especial permission is obtained. 



316 



West Virginia University 



ADMISSION TO THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY. 

SECONDARY SCHOOL CREDITS. 

For admission to the course in pharmacy the student must have 
credit for fifteen units of secondary school work, i. e., the work of a 
standard four-year' high school. . 

The following groups are required: 

(1) Three of four units of English. 1 

(2) Three units in one other subject. 

(3) Two units in a third subject. 

(4) Two units in a fourth subject. 

(5) Four units elective. 

B. In addition to the units of English the work indicated in 
(A) must include: Two units of Latin, one unit of history, 
one unit of algebra and one unit of plane geometry. 

C. Chemistry and physics are highly recommended for those 
entering pharmacy. 

D. Work in the following subjects not to exceed the number of 
units placed after each subject will be accepted: 



English 


4 units 


Science 3 










Physics 


1 unit 


Foreign languages 2 






Chemistry 


1 unit 


Latin 


4 


units 


Biology 


1 unit 


Greek 


3 units 


Botany 


1 unit 


French 


3 


units 


Geology 


1 unit 


German 


3 


units 


Zoology 


1 unit 


Spanish 


2 


units 


General science 


1 unit 


Italian 


2 


units 


Physical geography 
Physiology 


% unit 
% unit 


Mathematics 






Hygiene and sanitation Yz unit 


Algebra 


1% 


unit 






Plane geometry 


1 


unit 


Vocational subjects (not to exceed 


Solid geometry 


% 


unit 


four units in all). 




Trigonometry 


% 


unit 


Agriculture 
Household arts 


3 units 
3 units 


History and economics 






Manual training 


3 units 


History 


3 


units 


.Bookkeeping or book- 




Civics 


1 


unit 


keeping and commer- 




Elementary economics 


unit 


cial arithmetic 


2 units 


Sociology 


1 


unit 


Shorthand and type- 
writing 


2 units 


Education 


2 


units 


Commercial geography V2 unit 








Commercial law 


V2 unit 


Drawing 










Free-hand drawing 


1 


unit 


Music: — Violin, organ 01 




Mechanical drawing 


1 


unit 


piano 4 


2 units 



1A student who offers only three units in English must elect six hours of 
college work in that subject in addition to the minumum number of hours of Eng- 
lish required for his degree. 

2Not less than two units of one foreign language willl be accepted for entrance 
unless additional college work is taken in that language. 

3Groups of 2 or 3 units for entrance may be made by combining any 2 or 3 
units of biology, botany, chemistry, geology, physics and zoology. 

4For conditions governing entrance' credit in music see announcements of the 
School of Music. 



The Department of Pharmacy 317 

THREE-YEAR COURSE. 

For the completion of the three-year course the degree of Phar- 
maceutical Chemist (Ph.C.) is awarded. The course is designed par- 
ticularly for those who desire to enter the commercial field of phar- 
macy, or for those pharmacists who wish to strengthen their profes- 
sional relations by the practice of urinary, bacteriological and toxi- 
cological analysis for the physician. 

CURRICULUM FOR THE THREE- YEAR COURSE. 

Professional Degree of Pharmaceutical Chemist (Ph.C). 

First Year — First Semester. 

English 1 9:00 M. W. F. 3 

English 3 9:00 T. Th. 2 

Pharmacy 1 8:00 T. Th. 2 

Pharmacy 2 8:00 M. W. F. 3 

Pharmacy 3 2:00-5:00 T. Th. 2 

Pharmacy 12 10:00 1\ Th. 2 

Chemistry 1 11:00 M. W. F. 2:00-4:00 M. F. 4 18 

First Year — Second Semester. 

English 2 8:00 M. W. F. 3 

English 4 8:00 T. Th. 2 

Chemistry 2 11:00 M. W. F. 2:00-4:00 M. F. 4 

Botany 6 10:00 M. F. 9:00-12:00 T. Th. 4 

Pharmacy 4 9:00 M. F. 2 

Pharmacy 5 2:00-5:00 T. Th. 9:00-12:00 S. 3 18 

Second Year — First Semester. 

Pharmacy 6 2:00 M. W. F. 3 

Pharmacy 7 2:00-5:00 T. Th. 2 

Pharmacy 14 3:00-5:00 M. W. F. 2 

Chemistry 37 9:00-12:0<0 M. T. W. Th. F. 5 

French, German or Elective 8:00 M. T. W. Th. F. 5 17 

Second Year — Second Semester. 

Pharmacy 15 8:00 M. T. W. Th. F. 5 

Chemistry 36 11:00 M. W. F. 2:00-5:00 T. Th. 5 

Physiology 1 10:00 M. W. F. 2:00-5:00 W. 4 

French, German or Elective 9:00 M. T. W. Th. F. 5 19 

Third Year — First Semester. 

Pharmacy 8 11:00 M. W. F. 3 

Pharmacy 9 10:00 T. 2:00-5:00 M. W. F. 4 

Pharmacy 11 9:00-12:00 S. 1 

Pharmacy 13 10:00 M. W. F. 3 

Chemistry 51 9:00 M. W. F. 3 

Hygiene & Sanitation 9 8:O0T. Th. 2 

Elective 2 18 



318 



West Virginia University 



Third Year — Second Semester. 



Pharmacy 10 


10:00 M. F. 2:00-5:00 T. W. 


. 4 


Pharmacy 16 


11:00 W. 2:00-5:00 M. F. 


3 


Pharmacy 19 


10:00 T. Th. S. 


2 


Pharmacology 20 


11:00 M. T. W. Th. F. 


5 


Bacteriology 5 


8:00-10:00 M. T. W. Th. F. 


5 19 



FOUR- YEAR COURSE. 

The four-year course is a combined academic and professional 
course including one hundred and forty-four semester hours of work 
as shown in the following curriculum. 

Professional Degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy (BjSc.Phar.) 



English 1 
English 3 
Mathematics 3 
Chemistry 1 
Physics 1 
Physics 3 
Pharmacy 12 



English 2 
English 4 
Mathematics 4 
Chemistry 2 
Physics 2 
Physics 4 
Elective 



Pharmacy 1 
Pharmacy 2 
Pharmacy 3 
Chemistry 5 
Economics 1 
Elective 



Pharmacy 4 
Pharmacy 6 
Botany 6 
Chemistry 6 
Economics 2 



First Year — First Semester. 

10:00 M. W. F. 

9:00 T. Th. 
11:00 M. W. F. 

9:00 M. W. F. 2:00-4:00 M. F. 

8:00 M. W. F. 

Hours arranged 
10:00 T. Th. 

First Year — Second Semester. 

9:00 M. W. F. 

8:00 T. Th. 
11:00 T. Th. 
11:00 M. W. F. 2:00-4:00 M. F. 

8:00 M. W. F. 

Hours arranged 



Second Year — First Semester. 

8:00 T. Th. 
8:00 M. W. F. 
2:00-5:00 T. Th. 
2:00-5:00 M. W. F. 
0:00 M. W. F. 



Second Year — Second Semester. 

9:00 M. F. 

2:00 5:00 T. Th. 9:00-12:00 S 
10:00 M. F. 9:00-12:00 T. Th. 
2:00 5:00 M. W. F. 9:00-12:00 
8:00 M. W. F. 

Third Year — First Semester. 



W. 



Pharmacy 6 
Pharmacy 7 
Pharmacy 14 
French or German 
Hygiene & Sanitation 9 
Elective 



2:00 M. W. F. 
2:00-5:00 T. Th. 
3:00-5:00 M. W. F. 
9:00 iVC. T. W. Th. F. 

8:00 T. Th. 



3 
2 
3 
4 
3 
1 
2 18 



3 
2 
2 

4 
3 

1 
3 18 



2 
3 
2 

4 
3 
3 17 



2 
3 
4 
5 
3 17 



3 
2 
2 
5 
2 
4 18 



The Department of Pharmacy 319 

Third Year — Second Semester. 

Pharmacy 15 8:00 M. T. W. Th. F. 5 

Chemistry 36 11:00 M. W. F. 2:00-5:00 T. Th. 5 

Physiology 1 10:00 M. W. F. 2:00-5:00 W. 4 

French or German 9:00 M. T. W. Th. F. 5 19 

Fourth Year — First Semester. 

Pharmacy 8 11:00 M. W. F. 3 

Pharmacy 9 10:00 T. 2:00-5:00 M. W. F. 4 

Pharmacy 11 9:00-12:00 S. 1 

Pharmacy 13 10:00 M. W. F. 3 

Chemistry 51 9:00 M. W. F. 3 

Chemistry 63 11:00 T. Th. 2 

Elective 2 18 

Fourth Year — Second Semester. 

Pharmacy 10 10:00 M. F. 2:00-5:00 T. W. 4 

Pharmacy 16 11:00 W. 2:00-5:00 M. F. 3 

Pharmacy 19 10:00 T. Th. S. 2 

Pharmacology 20 11:00 M. T. W. Th. F. 5 

Bacteriology 5 8:00-10:00 M. T. W. Th. F. 5 19 

NOTE: All electives must be approved by the class officer be- 
fore election. 

Approved courses: 

Bacteriology 4, Advanced Course. 3 Hrs. 

Bacteriology 7, State and Municipal Laboratory Methods. 2 Hrs. 

Bacteriology 8, Immunity and Serum Therapy. 2 Hrs. 

Bacteriology 11, Laboratory Diagnosis. 2 Hrs. 

Chemistry 7, Quantitative Analysis. 4 Hrs. 

Chemistry 8, Quantitative Analysis. 5 Hrs. 

Chemistry 11, Synthetic Inorganic Chemistry. 3 Hrs. 

Chemistry 14, Organic Qualitative Analysis. 2 Hrs. 

Chemistry 16, Organic Quantitative Analysis. 2 Hrs. 

Chemistry 30, Dyes and Dye Intermediates. 2 to 4 rlrs. 

Chemistry 50, Industrial Chemistry. 3 to 4 Hrs. 

Chemistry 62, Chemistry of Colloids. 2 Hrs. 

Chemistry 74, History of Chemistry. 2 Hrs. 

Chem. Eng. 180, Benzene Derivatives. 2 Hrs. 

Chem. Eng. 181, Chem. Engineering & Manufactures. 2 Hrs. 

Chem. Eng. 182, Industrial Chemical Laboratory. 2 Hrs. 

Chem. Eng. 187, Water Examination and Purification. 2 Hrs. 

Chem. Eng. 192, Biochemical Industries. 3 Hrs. 

Economics 40, Marketing Methods. 3 Hrs. 

Economics 41, Marketing Problems. 3 Hrs. 

Economics 13, Business Organization. 2 Hrs. 

Economics 25, Advertising. 3 Hrs. 

Economics 26, Retail Store Management. 2 Hrs. 



320 West Virginia University 

Economics 41, Business Law. 3 Hrs. 
Economics 412, Business Law. 3 Hrs. 
French 1, 5 Hrs. (When not offered for entrance credit). 
French 2, 5 Hrs. (When not offered for entrance credit). 
German 1, 5 Hra (When not offered for entrance credit). 
German 2, 5 Hrs. (When not offered for entrance credit). 
German 21, iScientific German. 2 Hrs. 
German 22, Scientific German. 2 Hrs. 
Journalism 6, Advertising Writing. 2 Hrs. 
Physiological Chemistry 10. 5 Hrs. 
Pharmacy 17, Food & 'Drug Analysis. 2-5 Hrs. 
Pharmacy 18, Food & Drug Analysis. 2-5 Hrs. 
Philosophy 6, Logic. 3 Hrs. 
Political Science 5. 3 Hrs. 
Psychology 1, 3 Hrs. 

Psychology 10, Applied, Advertising & Salesmanship. 2 Hrs. 
Zoology 1, Animal Biology. 4 Hrs. 
Zoology 2, Vertebrate Zoology. 4 Hrs. 
Zoology 7, Vertebrate Embryology. 3 Hrs. 

Zoology 31, Comparative Anatomy, Histology, and Embryology. 
3-5 Hrs, 

Zoology 16, Economic Zoology. 2 Hrs. 



The Department of Pharmacy 321 

COURSES IN DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY. 
PHARMACY. 

Professor Bergy, Assistant Professor Hayman and Mr. Hammond. 

1. Theoretical Pharmacy. (2 Hrs.) Lectures and recitations. 
(36 Hrs.) 

First semester; T., Th., 8:00; Mr. Hammond. 

2. Pharmaceutical Arithmetic and Stoichiometry. (3 Hrs.) 

Lectures and recitations. (54 hrs.)- 

First semester; M. W., F., 8:00; Mr. Hammond. 

3. Physics of Pharmacy. (2 Hrs.) A laboratory course de- 
signed to accompany courses 1 and 2 in pharmacy. Laboratory and 
quizzes. (100 Hrs.) 

First semester; T., Th., 2:00-5:00; Mr. Hammond. 

4. Operative Pharmacy Lectures. (2 Hrs.) Lectures and recita- 
tions. Prerequisite: Pharmacy 1, 2 and 3. (36 Hrs.) 

Second semester; M., F., 9:00; Mr. Hammond. 

5. Operative Pharmacy Laboratory. (3 Hrs.) This course is 
carried on in conjunction with Pharmacy 4. Laboratory (150 Hrs.) 

Second semester; T., Th., 2:00-5:00; S., 9:00-12:00; Professor 
Bergy and Mr. Hammond. 

6. Manufacturing Pharmacy Lectures. (3 Hrs.) Lectures and 
recitations. (54 Hrs.) Prerequisite: Pharmacy 4 and 5. 

First semester; M., W., F., 2:00; Professor Bergy. 

7. Manufacturing Pharmacy Laboratory. (2 Hrs.) Laboratory 
(100 Hrs.) 

Prerequisite: Pharmacy 4 and 5. 

First semester; T., Th., 2:00-5:00; Professor Bergy. 

8. Prescriptions and Incompatibilities. (3 Hrs.) Lectures and 
recitations (54 Hrs.) Prerequisite: Pharmacy 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7. 

First semester; M., W., F., 11:00; Assistant Professor Hayman. 

9. Assay and Pharmaceutical Testing. (3 to 5 Hrs.) Lectures 
(18 Hrs.) Laboratory (100-200 Hrs.) Prerequisite: Chemistry 5, 
6 and 9. 

First semester; T., 10:00; T., Th., 2:00-5:00; S., 9:00-12:00; 
Professor Bergy. 



322 West Virginia University 

10. Commercial Pharmacy. (4 Hrs.) Lectures and recitations. 
(36 Hrs.) Laboratory (100 Hrs.) 

Second semester; M., F., 10:00; T., W., 2:00-5:00; Assistant 
Professor Hayman and Mr. Hammond. 

11. Prescription Practice. (1 Hr.) Laboratory (50 Hrs.) Pre- 
requisite: Pharmacy 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8. 

First semester; S., 9:00-12:00; Assistant Professor Hayman. 

12. Pharmaceutical Latin. (2 Hrs.) Lectures and recitations. 
(36 Hrs.) 

First semester; T., Th., 10:00; Assistant Professor Hayman. 

13. Pharmaceutical Chemistry. (3 Hrs.) Lectures and recita- 
tions. (54 Hrs.) 

First semester; M., W., F., 10:00; Professor Bergy. 

14. Microscopy. (2 Hrs.) Laboratory (100 Hrs.) 

First semester; M., W., F., 3:00-5:00; Assistant Professor Hay- 
man. 

15. Pharmacognosy. (5 Hrs.) Lectures and recitations. (90 
Hrs.) 

Second semester; M. T., W., Th., F., 8:00; Assistant Professor 
Hayman. 

16. Organic Analysis. (3 Hrs.) Lectures (18 Hrs.) Labora- 
tory (100 Hrs.) i « 

Second Semester; W., 11:00; M., F., 2:00-5:00; Assistant Profes- 
sor Hayman. 

17. Food and Drug Analysis. (2 to 5 Hrs.) A graded course of 
lectures and laboratory work with collateral reading. Prerequisites: 
Chemistry 1, 2, 18, 9. Laboratory (100-250 Hrs.) 

First semester; M., T., W., Th., F., 2:00-5:00; Professor Bergy 
and Assistant Professor Hayman. 

18. Food and Drug Analysis. (2 to 5 Hrs.) A continuation of 
Pharmacy 17. Laboratory (100-250 Hrs.) 

Second semester; M., T., W., Th., 2:00-5:00; Professor Bergy 
and Assistant Professor Hayman. 

19. U. iS. P. and N. F. (2 Hrs.) Recitations (54 Hrs.) 
Second semester T., Th., S., 10:00; Assistant Professor Hayman. 

20 Pharmacology. (5 Hrs.) Required of all students in phar- 
macy. Lectures and recitations (72 Hrs.) 

Second semester; M., T., W., F., 11:00; Professor Bergy. 
Required of all students in pharmacy. Laboratory (35 Hrs.) 



The Department of Pharmacy 323 

CHEMISTRY. 

Professor Clark and Staff. 

1. Inorganic Chemistry. (4 Hrs.) Experimental lectures, reci- 
tations and laboratory work. Lecture 54 Hrs. Laboratory 70 Hrs. 

First semester; M., W., F., 9:00 and 11:00; laboratory, M., F., 
2:00-4:00. 

2. Inorganic Chemistry. (4 Hrs.) Continuation of Chemistry 
1. Experimental lectures, recitations and laboratory work. Lectures 
and recitations 54 Hrs. Laboratory 70 Hrs. 

Second semester; M., W., F., 11:00; laboratory, M., F., 2:00-4:00. 

37. Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis. (5 Hrs.) A course 
for students preparing for pharmacy. Lectures and recitations 15 
Hrs. Laboratory 240 Hrs. 

First semester; daily 9:00-12:00; Associate Professor Hill. 

5. Qualitative Analysis. (4 Hrs.) Laboratory 150 Hrs. 
First semester; M., W., F., 2:00-5:00; Professor Clark. 

6. Quantitative Analysis. (5 Hrs.) Laboratory 200 Hrs. 
Second semester; laboratory, M., W., F., 2:00-5:00; and 9:00- 

12:00, W.; Professor Clark. 

36. Organic Chemistry. (6 Hrs.) Lectures 50 Hrs. Laboratory 
100 Hrs. 

Second semester; M., W., F., 11:00; W., 11:00; 2:00-5:00; T., 
Th.,; Professor Clark. 

Note. — Hours arranged for pharmacy students. 

51.f Industrial Chemistry. (3 Hrs.) Open to major and grad- 
uate students and to students in chemical engineering, and pharmacy. 
First semester; M., W., F., 9:00; Professor Clark. 

52. f Industrial Chemistry. (3 Hrs.) Open to major and grad- 
uate students and to students in chemical engineering and pharmacy. 
First semester; M., W., F., 9:00; Professor Clark. 

60. Physical Chemistry. (5 Hrs.) Required of major students. 
For graduate students and chemical engineering students also. Three 
lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods weekly. Lectures 54 
Hrs. Laboratory 100 Hrs. 

Second semester; M., W., F., 9:00; T., Th., 2:00. 

Note. — A breakage deposit is required of all students taking lab- 
oratory courses. 



324 West Virginia University 

PHYSIOLOGY. 

1. Physiology. (4 Hrs.) Lectures 54 Hrs. Laboratory 50 Hrs. 
Second semester; M., W., F., 10:00; laboratory, W., 2:00 to 5:00. 

PHYSIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY. 

1. Physiological Chemistry. Prerequisites: Organic chemistry 
and quantitative analysis. Lectures and recitations 36 Hrs. Labora- 
tory 144 Hrs. 

First semester; section A, laboratory, M., Th., 8:00-12:00, S., 
8:00-10:00; section B, laboratory, T., F. 5 8:00-12:00, S., 11:00-1:00; 
Lectures both sections W., 11:00-1:00; S., 10:00-11:00. 

BACTERIOLOGY. 

5. Medical Bacteriology. (5 Hrs.) Required of third-year medi- 
cal students. 

,Second semester; lectures, (36 Hrs.) M., 8:00; F., 11:00; labora- 
tory, (144 Hrs.) M., T., W., Th., F., 8:00 to 10:00 or 10:00 to 12:00; 

Associate Professor Spray. 

4. State and Municipal Laboratory Methods. (2 Hrs.) Open to 

fourth year students. Prerequisite: Bacteriology 3 or its equivalent- 
Hours to be arranged; Professor Smith. 

6. Hygiene and Sanitation. (2 Hrs.) Not open to freshmen. 
Lectures and recitations (36 hours.) 

First semester; T., Th., 8:00; Dr. Spray. 

3. Laboratory Diagnosis. (2 Hrs.) Laboratory 100 Hrs. 
Second semester; hours to be arranged; Dr. Spray. 

BOTANY. 

Professor Strausbaugh. 

6. Pharmaceutical Botany. (4 Hrs.) Two lecture periods and 
two three-hour laboratory periods each week. Lectures and recita- 
tion 36 Hrs. Laboratory 100 Hrs. 

Second semester; M., F., 10:00; T., Th., 9:00-12:00. 



The School of Music 



STAFF OF INSTRUCTION. 

FRANK BUTLER TROTTER, A.M., LL.D., President of the Uni- 
versity 

LOUIS BLACK, Director and Head of the Vocal Department 

FLORA RAY HAYES, A.B., Instructor in Theory and History of 

Music 

LYDIA IRENE HINKEL, Mus.B., Head of Public School Music De- 
partment 

ETHEL BORDEN BLACK, Head of Piano Department 

GRACE MARTIN SNEE, B.M., Instructor in Piano and Pipe Organ 

SUSAN MAXWELL MOORE, A.B., Instructor in Piano 

MARGARET BUTMAN, Instructor in Piano. Piano Normal De- 
partment 

FRANK DELLI-GATTI, Head of Violin and Ensemble Departments 

LUCY BELTZHOOVER DILLE, Assistant in Voice 

CHARLES STUMP, Assistant in Public School Music 



BUILDING AND EQUIPMENT. 

The school is located in a separate building containing five studios 
and class rooms, and eight practice rooms. 

The equipment consists of thirteen upright and eight grand 
pianos, and a three manual tubular pneumatic pipe organ located in 
Commencement Hall. 



326 West Virginia University 

CONCERTS AND RECITALS. 

STUDENT CONCERTS. 

A .students' concert is given each week. These concerts vary in 
grade from elementary to graduate and post-graduate recitals. The 
object is to afford opportunity for the students to apply in public the 
proficiency that has been developed in the studio. 

THE UNIVERSITY CHOIR. 

This organization has been in existence for fifteen years under 
the present director. It is open to all students who can sing a part. 
Its principal function is to sing in the devotional exercises at Convo- 
cation each Wednesday. This gives the members a practical church 
choir experience. 

During the year the choir appears in secular concerts and in 
special musical convocations. 

GENERAL ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

iStudents may enter the .School of iMusic at any time, but it is 
greatly to their interest to enter, as far as possible, at the beginning 
of the semester. 

Students entering within the first two weeks of a 'semester will 
be charged for the full semester; after that time, for the remainder of 
the semester and one week additional. 

There is no deduction made for lessons missed by students except 
in case of prolonged illness, when the loss is divided equally between 
the student and the school. 

Students of the School of Music are not allowed to take part in 
public programs or to join musical organizations without the consent 
of their respective teachers and the 'director of the school. 

All music students are expected to attend the regular students' 
recitals, and to take part in them whenever so assigned, and to attend 
all concerts given under auspices of the University. They are ex- 
pected to identify themselves with the various organizations of the 
school, and are required to enter any to which they are assigned by 
the director. 

It is expected that all students will take sufficient work — literary 
or musical or both — to occupy their entire time. 



The School of Music 327 

CREDIT FOR MUSIC ON COLLEGE COURSES. 

Credit' towards the degree of Bachelor of Arts will be given for 
courses in music, not to exceed fifteen semester hours in all. 

COURSES OF STUDY. 

The School of Music offers instruction in the following courses: 
theory, public school music, voice, piano, violin, organ. In voice, 
piano, organ, and violin two courses are offered, one leading to a 
teachers' certificate, and one leading to an artist's diploma. The 
course in public school music leads to a supervisor's certificate, which 
exempts the holder from the State Board examination and to the 
degree of Bachelor of Music. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 

No student can register for any course in music for credit toward 
any degree (A.B. or B.M.) without passing an examination in sol- 
feggio, or demonstrating to the satisfaction of the head of the de- 
partment the ability to read music of moderate difficulty, and giving 
evidence of the mastery of the elements of music. 

Students desiring to enter the course leading to the teacher's 
certificate in Public School Music must have credit for fifteen units 
of secondary school work, that is, the work of a standard four year 
high school with the same groups as are required for entrance to the 
College of Arts and Sciences. In addition to the fifteen units stu- 
dents must also have a fairly quick sense of rhythm and tune, an 
acceptable singing voice, and the ability to read at sight vocal music of 
moderate difficulty. They must also have completed two years of 
piano study equivalent to course 22 (see page....). 

Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Music must meet the 
same admission requirements as candidates for the teacher's certifi- 
cate. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS. 

Candidates for a teacher's certificate in piano, voice, organ, or 
violin, must present a high school diploma or equivalent 
credits. They must complete courses 75, 76, 79, 80 and 101 to 112 in- 
clusive, English 1, 2, 3, and 4, 4 hours Public Speaking, and show 
satisfactory proficiency in ensemble work. 

Candidates for an artist's diploma must meet all the requirements 
imposed for the teacher's certificate and appear satisfactorily in a 
graduating recital. 



328 West Virginia University 

VOICE. 

'Candidates for the teacher's certificate in voice, in -addition to 
the above general requirements, must satisfactorily complete the 
four-year course in voice as outlined below, and must possess the 
a'bility to perform acceptably selections from the standard oratorios 
and operas. They must also complete 30 hours of the modern lan- 
guages — 'French, German and Italian, 8 hours of piano, and courses 
73 and 74. 

Candidates for the artist's diploma in voice must satisfy all the 
requirements for the teacher's certificates, and give a graduating 
recital. 

PIANO. 

Candidates for the teacher's certificate in piano, in addition to 
the general requirements, must satisfactorily complete the course 
outlined below for the elementary, intermediate and advanced grades. 
They must also complete the courses in ensemble playing and piano 
teaching. 

Candidates for the artist's diploma in piano must satisfy all the 
requirements for the teacher's certificate and must complete the work 
in piano outlined ibelow for the advanced grade. A graduating recital 
must be given. 

VIOLIN. 

Candidates for the teacher's certificate in violin must satisfac- 
torily complete' the three-year course in violin music as outlined be- 
low, including the concertos of Viotti, Rode and Kreutzer, and the 
lighter works of some modern composer. They must also have some 
knowledge of piano playing. 

Candidates for the artist's diploma must give a graduating re- 
cital program including one sonata or concerto, one trio or quartet, 
and solo,s. 

PIPE ORGAN. 

Candidates for teacher's certificate in organ, must satisfy all 
theoretical requirements for piano and the course in organ as outlined 
below. 

Candidates for artist's diploma must give a public recital, the 
program to include selections from the larger works of Bach, Men- 
delssohn, Guilmant, or Rheinberger Sonatas, and a group of more 
modern works. 

NOTE — Students desiring to become candidates for certificates 
or diplomas should note that while the above mentioned courses are 
referred to as three-year and four-year courses no definite period of 
time can be assigned for their completion. In all cases certificates 
and diplomas are awarded on the basis of the proficiency acquired, 
rather than on the length of time devoted to the course. 



The Scuoqf. of Music 



329 



PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC. 

There are two curricula offered in Public School Music: 

1. A three-year curriculum leading to the teacher's certificate 
in Public School Music. 

2. A four-year curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
Music. 

Both the certificate and the degree exempt the holder from ex- 
amination by the State Board. 

Curriculum Leading to Certificate in Public School Music. 







First Year. 




First Semester. 






Second Semester 




Modern Language 


5 


hours 


Modern Language 


5 hours 


English 1 


3 


>> 


English 2 


3 " 


Sight Singing 73 


3 


>j 


Sight Singing 74 


3 " 


Ear Training 75 


3 


>> 


Ear Training 76 


3 " 


Piano 


1 


yj 


Piano 


1 " 


Voice 


1 


)> 


Voice 


1 " 


Choir 


1 


y> 


Choir 
Total 


1 


Total 


17 


>> 


17 " 






Second Year. 




First Semester. 






Second Semester 




Modern Language 


5 


hours 


Modern Language 


5 hours 


Music Education 81 


1 


t} 


Music Education 81 


1 


Appreciation 77 


2 


» 


Appreciation 78 


2 " 


Harmony 101 


3 


f> 


Harmony 102 


3 " 


History of Music 


4 


)> 


History of Music 


2 " 


Orchestra 91 


1 


>> 


Orchestra 92 


1 " 


Piano 


1 


>> 


Piano 


1 


Voice 


1 


» 


Voice 
Total 


1 " 


Total 


18 


>> 


16 " 






Third Y 




First Semester. 






Second Semester 




Music Education 84 


1 


hours 


Music Education 83 


4 hours 


Music Education 82 


4 


>> 


Appreciation 80 


3 " 


Appreciation 79 


3 


hours 


Harmony 103 


2 " 


Orchestra 93 


1 


hours 


Orchestra 94 


2 " 


Practice Teaching 


1 


>> 


Practice Teaching 90 


1 


Piano 


1 


>> 


Piano 


1 


Voice 


1 


>> 


Voice 


1 " 


Elective 


6 


>> 


Electives 


2 " 



Total 



17 



Total 



17 



NOTE' — At least one year of practice teaching and one year of 
practice supervision are required in the course leading to a certificate 
in Public School Music. Observation and practice teaching are con- 
ducted in the Morgantown city schools through the courtesy and co- 
operation of the local Board and Superintendent. The work is done 
under the personal supervision of the head of the Department of Pub- 
lic School Music. Credit is not granted for this work until the student 
has satisfied the head of the department as to his skill in teaching. 



330 



West Virginia University 



Curriculum Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Music. 

Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Music must offer one 
hundred and thirty-six hours' credit for courses as stated forth below. 
No student is permitted to register for less than fourteen or more 
than seventeen hours' work in any one semester. 

Freshman Year. 



First Semester. 






Second Semester 




Modern Language 


5 


hours 


Modern Language 


5 hours 


Sight Singing 73 


3 


>> 


Sight Singing 74 


3 " 


Ear Training 75 


3 


>> 


Ear Training 76 


3 " 


English 1 


3 


>> 


English 2 


3 " 


Piano (Grade 3) 


1 


)} 


Piano (Grade 3) 


1 " 


Voice (1 year) 


1 


jf 


Voice (1 year) 


1 " 


Electives 


1 


" 


Electives 


1 " 



Total 



17 



Total 



17 



Sophomore Year. 



First Semester, 








Second Semester 








Modern Language 


5 


hours 


Modern Language 


5 


hours 


Appreciation 77 


2 




y 


Appreciation 78 


2 




y 


History of Music 


3 




y 


History of Music 


3 




y 


Harmony 101 


3 




y 


Harmony 102 


3 




y 


Orchestra 92 


1 




y 


Orchestra 93 


1 




y 


Piano (Grade 4) 


1 




' 


Piano (Grade 4) 


1 




y 


Voice (2 year) 


1 




y 


Voice (2 year) 


1 




y 


Electives 


1 


>> 


Electives 
Total 


1 


>> 


Total 


17, 


>> 


17 


>> 






Junior 


Year. 






First Semester. 






Second Semester. 




English 3 


2 


hours 


English 4 


2 


hours 


Music Education 82 


4 


>■> 


Music Education 81 


2 


>> 


Appreciation 79 


3 


>> 


Music Education 83 


4 


>> 


Harmony 103 


2 


j> 


Appreciation 80 


3 


yy 


Orchestra 94 


1 


y> 


Orchestra 95 


1 


>> 


Ensemlble 113 


1 


>> 


Ensemble 114 


1 


j) 


Practice Teaching 90 


1 


?> 


Practice Teaching 90 


1 


>> 


Piano (Grade 5) 


1 


yy 


Piano (Grade 5) 


1 


?> 


Voice (Course 5) 


1 


" 


Voice (Course 5) 


1 


yy 


Electives 


2 


yy 


Total 






Total 


18 


hoi 


irs 


16 hoi 


irs 



The School of Music 



331 



First Semester. 

Education 
Physics 1 and 3 
Public Speaking 
Music Education 84 
Music Education 86 
Music Education 88 
Orchestra 96 
Practice Supervision 91 
Piano (Grade 6) 
Voice (Course 6) 
Chorus 





Senior 


Year. 












Second Semester. 






3 


hours 


Education 




3 


hours 


4 


\> 


Public Speaking 




3 


>> 


3 


5> 


Music Education 85 






>> 




5> 


Music Education 87 
Music Education 89 






>> 
>> 




>> 


Orchestra 97 






" 




)> 


Practice Supervision 


91 




>> 




>> 


Piano (Grade 6) 






" 




>> 


Voice (Course 6) 






" 




>> 


Chorus 






ft 




>> 


Electives 




2 


>> 



18 



16 



NOTE — The courses in English, education, modern languages, 
public speaking and physics are taken in the College of Arts and 
Sciences. Electives may be chosen from any of the music courses 
not included in the required work, or from the courses in 
science, mathematics, education, history or modern language. The 
student must satisfactorily complete the work of course 29, in piano 
and of course 6 in voice. In cases where a student excels in some 
other instrument than the piano, exceptions may be made in the 
amount of piano required, at the discretion of the head of the depart- 
ment. All candidates for the degree must appear in a graduation 
concert. 



332 West Virginia University 

DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION. 

Strict adherence to a fixed list of studies is not required. The 
needs of the individual student are considered and the studies varied 
accordingly. An idea of the work covered in the different classes 
may be obtained from the following announcements of courses. Un- 
less otherwise stated each two-hour credit course will consist of two 
one-hour recitation periods each week with the requisite amount of 
practice and study (not less than four hours weekly). 

VOICE. 

Director Black. 

1. First Year Course. (2 Hrs.) Technique; 'scales, arpeggios, 
etc.; vocalises, Panofka and Concone, Vaccai and Marchesi. Simple 
songs in Italian and English. 

First semester; hours to be arranged. 

2. First Year Course. (2 Hrs.) Continuation of Course 1. 
Second semester; hours to be arranged. 

3. Second Year Course. (2 Hrs.) Technique; scales, Lutgen, 
Concone, Lamperti, Panofka, etc. Songs in Italian and English. En- 
semble; duets, trios, and quartets. 

First 'semester; hours to be arranged. 

4. Second Year Course. (2 Hrs.) Continuation of Course 3. 
Second 'semester; hours to be arranged. 

,5. Third Year Course. (2 Hrs.) Technique; Bona, Lutgen, Con- 
cone, Bordogni, etc. Arias from standard grand operas and oratorios. 
Ensemble. 

First semester; hours to be arranged. 

6. Third Year Course. (2 Hrs.) Continuation of Course 5. 
[Second semester; hours to be arranged. 

7. Fourth Year Course. (2 Hrs.) Technique; Lamperti, Con- 
cone, Aprile, etc. Graduation recital program. 

First 'semester; hours to be arranged. 

8. Fourth Year Course. (2 Hrs.) Continuation of Course 7. 
Second semester; hours to be arranged. 

9. Choir. (1 Hr.) 

First semester; hours to be arranged. 

10. Choir. (1 Hr.) Continuation of Course 9. 
Second semester; hours to be arranged. 

11. Glee Club. (1 Hr.) 

First semester; hours to be arranged. 

12. Glee Club. (1 Hr.) Continuation of Course 11. 
Second semester; hours to be arranged. 



The School of Music 333 

PIANO. 

Mrs. Black, Miss Moore, Mrs. Snee, and Miss Butman. 

21. Elementary Course. (2 Hrs.) Not accepted for credit 
for the degree of Bachelor of Music. Grade I. (a) Structure of 
the keyboard and fundamentals of notation, (b) Technique: all major 
scales, finger exercises; transposition of such exercises into familiar 
keys, (c) Studies and short pieces of the first grade by standard 
composers, (d) Ear training: pitch and rhythm of short melodic 
phrases, (e) Sight reading: simple duets for teacher and pupils. 

22. Elementary Course. (2 Hrs.) Not accepted for credit for 
the degree of Bachelor of Music. Grade II. (a) More advanced nota- 
tion, (b) Technique: all major scales in parallel and contrary mo- 
tion; minor scales in parallel motion; finger exercises; transposition 
of exercises into familiar keys, (c) Studies by Kohler, Loeschhorn 
and Heller; Little Preludes by Bach, sonatinas by Clementi and 
others; classical and romantic compositions of second grade, (d) Ear 
training: phrases in one and two voice-parts, (e) Sight reading: 
pieces of first grade; duets. 

23. Elementary Course. (2 Hrs.) Not accepted for credit for the 
degree of Bachelor of Music. Grade III. (a) Technic: all major and 
minor scales in parallel and contrary motion; two-octave arpeggios 
in triads, dominants and diminished seventh chords; finger exercises; 
transposition of exercises into various keys, (b) Studies such as 
Berens' Velocity Studies; Kuhlau and Clementi sonatinas, Schu- 
mann's Album for the Young, and miscellaneous compositions of 
third grade, (c) Ear training: phrases in one to four voice parts, 
(d) Sight reading: pieces of second grade. 

24. Intermediate Course. (2 Hrs.) Grade IV. (a) Technic: 
scales and arpeggios in all keys; scales in thirds; exercises for fingers, 
arm, pedals, etc.; transposition of exercises, (b) Studies such as 
Cramer's Fifty Studies (Schirmer edition), Czerny's Velocity Studies 
Op. 299; two-voice inventions by Bach, sonatas by Haydn and Mozart, 
and miscellaneous compositions of fourth grade, (c) Ear training: 
phrases in two to four voice-parts, (d) Sight reading: pieces of 
third grade. 

First semester; hours to be arranged. 

25. Intermediate Course. (2 Hrs.) Continuation of course 24. 
Second semester; hours to be arranged. 

26. Intermediate Course. (2 Hrs.) Grade V. (a) Technic: ar- 
peggios in extended positions; scales in thirds and sixths. (b) 



334 West Virginia University 

Cramer and Ozerny studies continued; studies by Jensen and Haber- 
bier; three-voice inventions by Bach, Beethoven's earlier sonatas, 
and miscellaneous compositions of fifth grade, (c) Ear training: 
phrases in four- voice parts, (d) iSight reading: sonatas by Clementi, 
Kuhlau, etc. 

First semester; hours to be arranged. 

27. Intermediate Course. (2 Hrs.) Continuation of Course 26. 
Second semester; hours to be arranged. 

28. Intermediate Course. (2 Hrs.) Grade VI. (a) Technic: 
rapid scales and arpeggios; octave exercises; transpositions, (b) 
Studies such as dementi's Gradus ad Farnassum, Czerny Op. 740; 
Bach's Well-Tempered Clavichord, other Beethoven sonatas, sonatas 
by Weiber, Grieg, Chopin, and miscellaneous compositions of sixth 
grade, (c) Ear training: more difficult phrases in four voice-parts, 
(d) Sight reading: simpler sonatas by Haydn and Mozart. 

First semester; hours to be arranged. 

29. Intermediate Course. (2 Hrs.) Continuation of Course 28. 
Second semester; hours to be arranged. 

30. Advanced Course. (2 Hrs.) Grade VII. (a) Technic: com- 
plex and extended scale and arpeggios, (b) More difficult composi- 
tions by Beethoven, Chopin, Schumann and Liszt; piano concertos by 
Beethoven, Mozart, Mendelssohn and others; miscellaneous composi- 
tions of seventh grade. 

First semester; hours to be arranged. 

31. Advanced Course. (2 Hrs.) Continuation of Course 30. 
Second semester; hours to be arranged. 

32. — iSight Playing. (1 Hr.) The work is arranged for classes of 
four or six, one hour per week and consists of rhythmic scale work, 
transposition of simple hymn forms, study of the classics, such as 
overtures, quartettes and symphonies, and the study of modern com- 
positions. 

First semester; hours to be arranged; Miss Moore. 

33. Sight Playing. (1 Hr.) Continuation of Course 32. 
Second semester; hours to be arranged; Miss Moore. 

34. Teaching of Piano. (1 Hr.) A course in the teaching of 
piano is offered to advanced students in response to a growing demand 
for teachers whose general musical knowledge includes a practical 
and comprehensive training in piano teaching. The course not only 
aims to present the principles of pedagogy and scientific piano study 
as applied in present day methods, but illustrates by means of prac- 



The School of Music 335 

tice teaching the application of these principles to the needs of the 
individual student. Four hours of this work is required of all candi- 
dates for teachers' certificates in piano. 

First semester; hours to be arranged; Miss Butman. 

35. Teaching of Piano. (1 Hr.) Continuation of Course 34. 
Second semester; hours to be arranged; Miss Butman. 

36. Teaching of Piano. (1 Hr.) Continuation of Course 34. 
First semester; hours to be arranged; Miss Butman. 

37. Teaching of Piano. (1 Hr.) Continuation of Course 34. 
Second semester; hours to be arranged; Miss Butman. 

Examinations in Piano. 

All entering students, other than beginners, will be given an en- 
trance examination to determine for which grade they are fitted. 

All piano students will be examined at least twice a year, in Jan- 
uary and in June, to determine the progress made. 

VIOLIN. 

Mr. Delli-Gatti. 

41. Elementary Course. (2 Hrs.) Sweik semitone system; Hans 
Sitt, twenty studies for beginners; Fred. David, twenty-four studies 
in first position; Hans Sitt, twelve pieces in first position; scales and 
arpeggi in first position. 

First semester; hours to be arranged. 

42. Elementary Course. (2 Hrs.) Continuation of Course 11. 
Second semester; hours to be arranged. 

43. Intermediate Course. (2 Hrs.) Hans Sitt, twenty studies 
in second, third, and fourth positions; twenty studies in shifting the 
positions, by the same author; studies by Leonard and Dont; scales 
and arpeggi in three octaves; concertos, Sitt and Viotti. 

First semester; hours to be arranged. 

44. Intermediate Course. (2 Hrs.) Continuation of Course 43. 
Second semester; hours to be arranged. 

45. Intermediate Course. (2 Hrs.) Kreutzer studies; Viotti 
concerto No. 22; Kreutzer, No. 19; Fiorilli studies; Rode concerto, 
No. 7; Deberiot concertos Nos. 7 and 9. 

First semester; hours to be arranged. 



336 West Virginia University 

46. Intermediate 'Course. (2 Hrs.) Continuation of Course 45. 
(Second semester; hours to be arranged. 

47. Advanced Course. (2 Hrs.) Rode studies; Wierniawski con- 
certo; David studies. 

First semester; hours to be arranged. 

48. Advanced Course. (2 Hrs.) Continuation of Course 47. 
Second semester; hours to be arranged. 

49. Advanced Soloist Course. (2 Hrs.) Scales and arpeggi in 

three octaves; sonatas by 'Bach; Paganini etudes; concertos by Men- 
delssohn, Saint Saens, Max Bruch. 

First semester; hours to be arranged. 



49. 



50. Advanced Soloist Course. (2 Hrs) Continuation of Course 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. 

51. Orchestra. (1 Hr.) 

First semester; hours to be arranged. 

52. Orchestra. (1 Hr.) Continuation of Course 51. 

Second semester; hours to be arranged. 

ENSEMBLE. 

Mr. Delli-Gatti. 

53. Accompanying. (1 Hr.) The course furnishes opportunity 
to advanced students to acquire the art of accompanying songs, violin 
and cello solos. 

First semester; hours to be arranged. 

54. Accompanying. (1 Hr.) Continuation of Course 53. 
Second semester; hours to be arranged. 

55. Chamber Music. (1 Hr.) The study of sonatas, trio and 
string quartettes by Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Bach, Handel, Men- 
delssohn, Gade, Grieg, etc. Open to violinists, cellists, pianists and 
viola players. 

First semester; hours to be arranged. 

56. Chamber Music. (1 Hr.) Continuation of Course 55. 
Second semester; hours to be arranged. 



The School of Music 337 

PIPE ORGAN. 

Mrs. Snee. 

61. First Year Course. (2 Hrs.) Grade I. Stainer's Organ 
Book; Rink's Organ School; Schneider's Pedal Studies; hymn playing 
and easy organ composition. 

First semester; hours to be arranged. 

62. First Year Course. (2 Hrs.) Continuation of Course 61. 
Second semester; hours to be arranged. 

63. Second Year Course. (2 Hrs.) Grade II. Buck's studies 
in pedal phrasing; Bach short preludes and fugues; easier sonatas of 
Guilmant, and Mendelssohn; organ pieces by Hollins, Lemarc, and 
Rhineberger. 

First semester; hours to be arranged. 

64. Second Year Course. (2 Hrs.) Continuation of Course 63. 
Second semester; hours to be arranged. 

65. Third Year Course. (2 Hrs.) Larger works of Bach; more 
difficult sonatas of Guilmant, Mendelssohn, and Rhineberger; pieces 
by Dubois, Salome, Lemmeus, Grison. 

First semester; hours to be arranged. 

66. Third Year Course. (2 Hrs.) Continuation of Course 65. 
Second semester; hours to be arranged. 

67. Fourth Year Course. (2 Hrs.) Handel concerto; Wider 
symphonies; Bach Toccato and Fugue; Graduation recital program. 

First semester; hours to be arranged. 

68. Fourth Year Course. (2 Hrs.) Continuation of Course 67. 
Second semester; hours to be arranged. 

PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC. 

71. Elementary Sight Singing. (3 Hrs.) Not accepted for credit 
for the degree of Bachelor of Music. Designed to meet the needs of 
students who are deficient in reading the elements of music. 

First semester; M., W., F., 9:00; 

72. Elementary Sight Singing. (3 Hrs.) Continuation of 71. 
Second semester; M., W., F. 9:00; 

73. Sight Singing. (3 Hrs.) The reading of music involving 
difficult intervals, complicated rhythms, chromatic melody, modula- 
tions, etc., two-part singing. 

First semester; M., W., F., 11:00; 



338 West Virginia University 

74. Sight Singing. (3 Hrs.) Continuation of 73. Three and four- 
part singing. 

Second semester; M., W., F., 11:00; 

75. Ear Training. (3 Hrs.) Rhythmic and melodic dictation. 
Tonal relationships of the major and minor scales, introducing chro- 
matic intervals, and simple time problems. 

First semester; M., T., Th. 10:00; 

76. Ear Training. (3 Hrs.) Continuation of 75. More difficult 
rhythms and intervals. ,Song analysis. 

(Second semester; M., T., Th. 10:00; 

77. Music Appreciation. (2 Hrs.) Teaching children how to 
listen to music. Masterpieces suitable for children. 

First semester; T., Th. 9:00; 

78. Music Appreciation. (2 Hrs.) Continuation of 77. Conduct- 
ing music memory contests. 

Second semester; T., Th. 9:00; 

79. Music Appreciation. (3 Hrs.) The structure, development, 
and aesthetic content of the art of music. Analytical study of the 
smaller forms of musical composition from the standpoint of 
the listener to develop a taste for and an understanding of the best 
music. Illustrations from the works of the masters. Required of all 
music students. Prerequisite: Courses 75 and 76. 

First semester; M., W., F., 9:00; Miss Hinkel. 

80. Music Appreciation. (3 Hrs.) Analytical study of master- 
pieces in the larger forms of musical composition. Illustrations from 
the masters. Required of all music students. Prerequisite : Course 79. 

Second semester; M., W., F., 9:00; Miss Hinkel. 

81. Music Education. (2 Hrs.) Open to juniors. Study of the 
child voice. The changing voice of the boy. Selection and teaching 
of rote songs. Survey of materials used in the kindergarten. 

Both semesters; T., Th., 11:00; Miss Hinkel. 

82. Music Education. (4 Hrs.) Open to juniors. Study of 
materials and methods of teaching music in the primary grades. The 
application of the general principles of teaching to the teaching of 
music. Music in correlation with other primary subjects. 

First semester; M., T., Th., F., 10:00; Miss Hinkel. 

83. Music Education. (4 Hrs.) Continuation of 82, applied to 
intermediate grades. 

Second semester; M., T., Th., F., 10:00; Miss Hinkel. 



The School of Music 339 

84. Music Education. (1 Hr.) Open to seniors. Study of mate- 
rials and methods of teaching music in the junior high school. Music 
memory contests, etc. 

First semester; T. 9:00; Miss Hinkel. 

85. Music Education. (1 Hr.) Open to seniors. Comparative 
study of music systems in modern use. 

Second semester; T. 9:00; Miss Hinkel. 

86. Music Education. (1 Hr.) Open to seniors. The practical 
application of the supervisor's training and skill, not alone to the 
schoolroom, but to the needs of the community as a natural amplifi- 
cation of the school and its work. 

First semester; Th. 11:00; Miss Hinkel. 

87. Music Education. (1 Hr.) Continuation of 86. 
Second semester; Th. 11:00; Miss Hinkel. 

88. Music Education. (1 Hr.) Open to seniors. High school 
methods and materials, including, chorus, orchestra, glee clubs, con- 
ducting, music appreciation, harmony, credit for outside music study. 
Observation and practice. 

First semester; Th. 9:00; Miss Hinkel. 

89. Music Education. (1 Hr.) Continuation of 88. 
Second semester; Th. 9:00; Miss Hinkel. 

90. Observation and Practice Teaching. (2 Hrs.) Open to 
juniors and seniors. Daily beginning the junior year and continuing 
until satisfactory skill has been attained. 

Seneca School; 1:30-3:00 p. m.; Miss Hinkel. 

91. Practice Supervision and High School Teaching. (2 Hrs.) 

Open to seniors. Actual supervision of juniors at Seneca School, 
practice teaching and conducting of high school classes in music. 
Miss Hinkel. 

92. Orchestra Class. (1 Hr.) Study of the cornet and trom- 
bone in classes. Tone production, simple exercises and scales, easy 
pieces, fingering of cornet, positions of the slide trombone and their 
relationship. Literature of brass instruments. Mitchell's class 
method will be the text used. 

First semester; Mr. Stump. 

93. Orchestra Class. (1 Hr.) Study of the clarinet. Boehm and 
Albert systems. Tone production, simple scales and exercises. 
Mitchell's Class Method will be the text used. 

First semester; Mr. Stump. 



340 West Virginia University 

94. Orchestra Class. (1 Hr.) Study of the flute. Boehm and 
Myer systems. Tone production, simple scales and exercises, easy 
pieces, literature. 

First semester; Mr. Stump. 

95. Orchestra Class. (1 Hr.) Study of the violin. Scales, sim- 
ple pieces and exercises, positions, tuning, etc. 

First semester; Mr. Delli-Gatti. 

96. Orchestra Class. (1 Hr.) Study of the viola and cello. 
Scales, simple pieces, exercises, positions, tuning, etc. 

First semester; Mr. Delli-Gatti. 

97. Orchestra Class. (1 Hr.) Playing in a band or orchestra 
for the purpose of acquiring actual experience. Band and orchestra 
material. 

Second semester; Mr. Stump. 

■NOTE — .Students owning instruments are requested to bring 
them with them, otherwise instruments will be rented for the class, 
and a small rental fee will be charged. 

THEORY OF MUSIC. 

Miss Flora Hayes. 

101. Introductory Harmony and Ear Training. (3 Hrs.) Key- 
board harmony. Prerequisite; at least one semester's work in piano. 

First semester; M., W., F., 9:00. 

102. Intermediate Harmony and Ear Training. (3 Hrs.) Key- 
board harmony. Continuation of course 101. 

Second semester; M., W., F., 9:00. 

103. Advanced Harmony and Harmonic Dictation. (2 Hrs.) Key- 
board harmony. Prerequisite: Courses 101 and 102. 

First semester; T., Th., 9:00. 

104. Advanced Harmony. (2 Hrs.) Continuation of course 103. 
Second semester; T., Th., 9:00. 

105. History of Music. (2 Hrs.) The ancient period. 
First semester; M., F., 10:00. 

Second semester; M., F., 10:00. 

106. History of Music. (2 Hrs.) The classic periods. 
•Second semester; M., F., 10:00. 



The School of Music 341 

107. History of Music. (2 Hrs.) The romantic period. 
First semester; T., Th., 10:00. 

108. History of Music. (2 Hrs.) Modern and current music. 
First semester; M., F., 10:00. 

109. Elementary Counterpoint. (3 Hrs.) Prerequisite: Courses 
101 and 102. 

First semester; M., W., F., 11:00. 

110. Advanced Counterpoint. (3 Hrs.) Continuation of course 
109. 

Second semester; M., W., F., 11:00. 

111. Analysis and Form. (2 Hrs.) The smaller forms. 
First semester; T., Th., 11:00. 

112. Analysis and Form. (2 Hrs.) The larger forms. 
Second semester; T., Th., 11:00. 



342 West Virginia University 

TUITION. 

Lessons per week 
Voice One Two Three 

Mr. Black $35.00 $55.00 $70.00 

•Mrs. Dille 25.00 35.00 

Piano 

Mrs. Black 35.00 55.00 70.00 

Mrs. Snee, Miss Moore and Miss But- 

man 25.00 35.00 

Miss Butman 

Elementary (with Normal Students) $ 7.00 per Semester 

Elementary (Miss Butman in Classes) 18.00' per Semester 

Piano Sight Playing (Class of 4, one 

hour per week) 10.00 per Semester 

Violin 

Mr. Delli-Gatti 

Elementary $20.00 $30.00 

Intermediate 25.00 35.00 

Advanced 25.00 40.00 

Orchestra Class (1 Hr.) 5.00 

Pipe Organ 

Mrs. Snee 30.00 50.00 

Ensemble 

Mr. Delli-Gatti 20.00 a sem. 

Theory of Music (Miss Hayes) ) <>_ AA 

t> iut o i, i T\/r • /,7\/r- tj- ,i i\ r «po-00 per semester hour 

Pu'bhc School Music (Miss Hmkel) j 

Piano for practice, one hour a day, will be furnished at $6.00 a 
semester; two hours a day at $10.00 a semester; three hours a day 
at $14.00 a semester; four hours a day at $18.00 a semester. 

Pipe organ practice, one hour a day, $10.00 a semester. 

Students whose work is wholly in the School of Music pay only 
tuition. 

Students who register in the School of Music and take University 
work not required in the music courses are subject to the usual Uni- 
versity fees except the athletic fee. 

SUMMER SCHOOL. 

The University Summer School begins each year at the close of 
the second semester (about June 15) and lasts ten weeks. Several 
members of the Music School Faculty are in residence for the first 
six weeks and offer' courses of special interest to those students who 
can attend only in summer, for particular pains is taken to cover all 
the ground possible in six weeks and the courses of study are ar- 
ranged with that end in view. 



The Summer School 



FACULTY. 

FRANK BUTLER TROTTER, A.M., LL.D., President of the Uni- 
versity 

LLOYD LOWNDES FRIEND, A.M., Director of the Summer School 

ALFRED JARRETT HARE, A.M., Registrar 



HOWARD BUSHNELL ALLEN, M.S., Assistant Professor of Ag- 
ricultural Education; Agricultural Education 

CHARLES HENRY AMBLER, Ph.D., Professor of History; History 

EDGAR LEWIS ANDREWS, B.S.Agr., Associate Professor of Poul- 
try Husbandry; Poultry Husbandry 

ERNEST LEE ANTHONY, M.S., Professor of Dairy Husbandry; 
Dairy Husbandry 

ROBERT ALLEN ARMSTRONG, A.M., L.H.D., Chaplain and Pro- 
fessor of English Language and Literature; English 

LONNA DENNIS ARNETT, Ph.D., Librarian; Library Science 

WINFREE LOYD ARRINGTON, Extension Instructor in Mining; 
Mining 

GEORGE RUSSELL BANCROFT, Ph.D., Associate Professor of 
Physiological Chemistry; Chemistry 

WAITMAN BARBE, A.M., Litt.D., Professor of English; English 

EUGENE WILLIAM BELL, Instructor in Mining; Mining 

LOUIS BLACK, Director University School of Music; Voice 

ETHEL BORDEN BLACK, Instructor in Piano in the School of 
Music; Piano 

GEORGE PAUL BOOMSLITER, M.S., Professor of Mechanics; 
Mechanics 

PAUL STEWART BUCHANAN, A.B., Instructor in Public Speak- 
ing; Public Speaking 



344 West Virginia University 

LEWIS VAN CARPENTER, B.S.C.E., Instructor in Structural and 
Hydraulic Engineering; Structural and Hydraulic Engineering 

LOUIS WATSON CHAPPELL, A.M., Instructor in English; English 

FLOYD EARLE CHIDESTER, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology; Zoology 

JOHN HAROLD CASEY, B.J., Assistant Professor of Journalism, 
University of Missouri; Journalism 

FRIEND EBENEZER CLARKE, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry; 
Chemistry 

ARMAND RENE COLLETT, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry; Chem- 



RACHEL HARTSHORN COLWELL, B.S., M.A., Professor of Home 
Economics; Home Economics 

LUCY M. COPELIN, A.M., Teacher of English in Morgantown High 
School; Teacher in Demonstration School 

JOHN HARRINGTON COX, Ph.D., Professor of English Philology; 
English 

F. WALDO CRAIG, B.S.Agr., Graduate Assistant in Entomology; 
Entomology 

ADAM CRAWFORD, Extension Instructor in Mining; Mining 

HOLLY ESTIL CUNNINGHAM, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy; 
Philosophy and Psychology 

ANDREW JACKSON DADISMAN, Ph.D., Professor of Farm Eco- 
nomics; Farm Economics 

ARLEIGH LEE DARBY, A.M., Professor of Romance Languages; 
French and Spanish 

EARL C. H. DAVIS, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry; Chem- 
istry 

EUGENE PEYTON DEATRICK, Ph.D., Associate Professor of 

Soils; Soils 

EDMUND CHARLES DICKINSON, A.B., J.D., Professor of Law; 
Quasi Contracts 

FREDERICK G. DETWILER, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology in Den- 
nison University; Sociology 

FRANK DELLI-GATTI, Instructor in Violin and Ensemble; Violin 



The Summer School 345 

MAXWELL JAY DORSE Y, Ph.D., Professor of Horticulture; Horti- 
culture 

ROBERT BARCLAY DUSTMAN, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 
Chemistry; Chemistry 

JOHN ARNDT EIESLAND, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics; 
Mathematics 

ANDREAS ELVIKEN, Cand. Mag., Instructor in European History; 
European History 

LESTER COLLINS FARRIS, A.M., Assistant Professor of English; 
English 

MARJA STEADMAN FEAR, A.B., Instructor in Public Speaking; 
Public Speaking 

WALTER LYNWOOD FLEMING, Ph.D., Professor of History and 
Dean, Vanderbilt University; History 

P. S. FLIPPIN, Ph.D., Professor of History, Mercer University; 
History 

THOMAS FRASER, E.M., Assistant Professor of Mining Engineer- 
ing; Milling 

CLARENCE EUGENE GARLAND, Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry; 
Chemistry 

C. R. GATES, A.B., Principal Westover School, Morgantown; Teacher 
Demonstration School 

ENOCH FRANKLIN GEORGE, Ph.D., Associate Professor of 
Physics; Physics 

WARREN GIFFORD, B.S.Agr., Assistant in Dairy Husbandry; 
Dairy Husbandry 

JAMES HERBERT GILL, M.E., Professor of Machine Construction; 
Machine Construction 

WILLIAM OLIVER GNAGEY, Instructor in Machine Shop Practice; 
Machine Shop 

GRACE MARGARET GRIFFIN, A.B., Instructor in Physical Edu- 
cation; Physical Education for Women 

THOMAS PORTER HARDMAN, M.A., J.D., Professor of Law; 
Public Utilities 

THOMAS LUTHER HARRIS, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology; Soci- 
ology 



346 West Virginia University 

JOSEPH HUNTER HASKELL, Instructor in Mining; Mining 

FLORA RAY HAYES, A.B., Instructor in the Theory and History 
of Music; The Theory and History of Music 

LESLIE DAVID HAYES, M.E., Professor of Machine Design and 
Construction; Mechanical Drawing 

LAWRENCE BENJAMIN HILL, Ph.D., Professor of Education; 
Education 

HARRY HILL, A.B., Assistant in Physics; Physics 

HUBERT HILL, M.S., Associate Professor of Chemistry; Chemistry 

LYDIA IRENE HINKEL, B.Mus., Instructor in Public School Music; 
Public School Music 

HARRY CHRISTOPHER HUMPHREYS, Ph. D., Associate profes- 
sor of Education; Education 

MABEL HODGES, A.M., Teacher of Mathematics in Parkersburg 
High School; Teacher in Demonstration School 

ERNEST JACKMAN, A.M., Principal High School, Dalton, Massa- 
chusetts; Supervisor of the Demonstration School 

CARL ALFRED JACOBSON, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry; 
Chemistry 

DAVID DALE JOHNSON, A.M., Professor of English; English 

WILLIAM W. JOHNSTON, A.M., Head of the English Department, 
Michigan Agricultural College; English 

CHARLES ROYAL KESSEL, B.S., M.D., University Physician; 
Hygiene and Sanitation 

CHARLES E. LAUTERBACH, Ph.D., Director of Educational Re- 
search, Sherwood Schools, Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Education 

CHARLES ELMER LAWALL, E.M., M.S., Associate Professor of 
Mining Engineering; Mining 

MINERVA LAWSON, Assistant in Public School Music; Public 
School Music 

MARIAN LEWIS, A.B., Teacher of English in High School, Dalton, 
Massachusetts; Teacher in Demonstration School 

EDWARD ALEXANDER LIVESAY, A.M., Professor of Animal 
Husbandry; Animal Husbandry 



The Summer School 347 

EDWARD SILVER MACLIN, B.S.Edu., Professor of Industrial 
Education; Industrial Education 

JULIAN PAUL MADDEN, Instructor in Mining; Mining 

RAY HEWITT MAGEE, Instructor in Mining; Mining 

MONTAGUE F. MODDER, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English 
in Miami University; English 

SUSAN MAXWELL MOORE, A.B., Instructor in Piano; Piano 

SAMUEL JOHN MORRIS, M.D., Professor of Anatomy; Microscopic 
Anatomy 

SAMUEL MORRIS, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry; Chemistry 

SIDNEY LAMONT McGEE, A.M., Instructor in Romance Lan- 
guages; French 

ALBERT JOHN MURPHY, M.A., Professor of Religious Education 
in the University of Pittsburgh; Religious Education 

ROY EZEKIEL NELSON, B.S.C.E., Instructor in Mining Engineer- 
ing; Mining 

HUBERT WILBUR NUTT, Ph.D., Professor of Education in Ohio 
Wesleyan University; Education 

THEODORE EDWARD ODLAND, M.S., Associate Professor of 
Agronomy; Agronomy 

DICKSON WARD PARSONS, M.S., Instructor in Vocational Agri- 
culture; Vocational Agriculture 

LEONARD MARION PEAIRS, B.S.Agr., M.S., Professor of Ento- 
mology; Entomology 

EBENEZER LEE PERRY, A.M., Professor of Latin, Bethany Col- 
lege; Latin 

DAVID H. PIERCE, M.A., Principal Greely School, Minneapolis, 
Minnesota; Education 

ALLEN WILSON PORT.ERFIELD, Ph.D., Professor of Germanic 
Languages and Literature; German 

JAMES STANLEY POUNDSTONE, Instructor in Mining; Mining 

CARL SPANGLER QUISENBERRY, B.S.Agr., Instructor in Agron- 
omy; Agronomy 



348 West Virginia University 

CLARENCE NEWTON REYNOLDS, Jr., Ph.D., Assistant Professor 
of Mathematics; Mathematics 

L. D. RICHER, Assistant Director of Physical Education, University 
of Akron, Akron, Ohio; Physical Education 

LOUIS AUGUST RUFENER, Ph.D., Professor of Economics; Eco- 
nomics 

EARLE REED SCHEFFEL, M.S., Associate Professor of Geology; 
Geology 

RAYMER EGBERT SEAMAN, Instructor in Woodworking and 
Foundry Practice; Manual Training 

GRACE MARTIN SNEE, Instructor in Pipe Organ; Pipe Organ 

CLIFFORD RAYMOND SNYDER, A.B., S.J.D., Professor of Law; 
Contracts in Restraint of Trade 

SYLVIA SOUPART, A.M., Teacher of English in Morgantown High 
School; Teacher in the Demonstration School 

CLAUDE CARL SPIKER, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Romance 
Languages; French and Spanish 

ROBB SPALDING SPRAY, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Bacter- 
iology; Bacteriology 

ELIZABETH STALNAKER, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Educa- 
tion; Education 

MADISON STATHERS, Ph.D., Professor of Romance Languages; 
French and Spanish 

HERMAN DELOSS STILLMAN, Instructor in Woodworking; 

Woodworking 

ERWIN COVERDALE STILWELL, M.S., Assistant Professor of 
Animal Husbandry; Animal Husbandry 

PERRY DANIEL STRAUSBAUGH, Ph.D., Professor of Botany; 
Botany 

CHARLES STUMP, Assistant in Public School Music; Public School 
Music 

RUAL BOWER SWIGER, A.M., Assistant in Geology, University of 
Oklahoma; Geology 

LELAND HART TAYLOR, S.D., Assistant Professor of Zoology; 
Zoology 



The Summer School 349 

RAYMOND JONES TITERINGTON, Instructor in Mining; Mining 

MARIAN TORREY, Ph.D., Instructor in Mathematics in the Uni- 
versity of Illinois; Mathematics 

GEORGE MALCOLM TROUT, B.S., Assistant in Dairy Husbandry; 
Dairy Husbandry 

BIRD MARGARET TURNER, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathe- 
matics; Mathematics 

ROBERT GRAHAM TURNER, M.S., Instructor in Chemistry; 
Chemistry 

JAMES RUSSELL TROTTER, Ph.D., LL.B., Professor of Law; 
Wills and Administration 

A. T. VOLWILER, Ph.D., Professor of History, Wittenberg College; 
History 

RUFUS ASA WEST, Instructor in Metal Working; Metal Working 

JOHN THOMAS WEST, A.M., Principal Morgantown High School; 
Teacher in the Demonstration School 

KYLE CHESTER WESTOVER, B.S., Assistant Professor of Horti- 
culture; Horticulture 

E. I. F. WILLIAMS, A.M., Professor of Education, Heidelberg Uni- 
versity, Tiffin, Ohio; Education 

ERNEST THOMAS WIGHTMAN, B.S.Agr., Assistant in Poultry 
Husbandry; Poultry Husbandry 

CHARLES VINYARD WILSON, M.S., Assistant Professor of 
Animal Husbandry; Animal Husbandry 

ELSIE WILSON, B.S., Cherokee, Illinois; Home Economics 



350 West Virginia University 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 



The twenty-seventh annual session of the Summer School of 
West Virginia University will begin Monday, June 15 and will close 
Saturday, August 29, 1925. It will be divided into two terms as fol- 
lows : 

First term, six weeks, June 16 to July 24. 
Second term, five weeks, July 27 to August 29. 

School will be in session six days in the week during the second 
term. This will make it possible for students to obtain full six weeks' 
credit for this term. 

ADMISSION. 

To be eligible for admission to the Summer School an applicant 
must be either, (1) a graduate of a standard high school or its equiv- 
alent, or (2) a mature man or woman capable of doing college work 
as a special student. Prospective students who expect to enter under 
the first designation should send their credits as soon as posibie to 
the Registrar, Professor A. J. Hare. 

FEES. 

The fee for the Summer School, either for the full session or for 
either of the short terms, is $10.00 for resident, students of West Vir- 
ginia and $15.00 for non-residents. This fee covers matriculation, in- 
cidentals, and laboratory charges. This statement applies to all 
courses offered in the Summer School except, (1) the courses in the 
Department of Medicine; (2) the courses in the School of Music. 

CREDITS. 

Work offered in the -Summer School is equivalent in method, 
character, and credit value to that of the academic year. Twelve 
hours credit may be made in the full session and six hours credit in 
either term. 

All grades will be mailed to the students by the Registrar at 
the close of the eleven weeks course. 

No statements or certificates will be given except those sent out 
from the Registrar's office. 



The Summer School 351 

LIVING ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MEN. 

In private homes, room rent ranges from $2.00 to $3.00 per week 
per roomer, with two persons in the room. The rate for single rooms 
ranges from $3.50 to $5.00 per week. Board may be had in boarding 
houses at $6.00 and $7.00 per week. Men desiring accommodations 
should address Mr. W. J. Jones, Y. M. C. A., Morgantown, West Vir- 
ginia, stating kind of place wanted, locality desired, and price they 
are willing to pay. 

LIVING ACCOMMODATIONS FOR WOMEN. 

Rooms in Woman's Hall, according to location, cost from $12.00 
to $15.00 per person, for six weeks; in the Annex, from $9.00 to 
$12.50. Table board is $6.00 per week. Meals are served in the din- 
ing hall of the Woman's Hall, which accommodates 300 persons. A 
deposit of $10.00 is required from all who desire to secure rooms either 
in the Woman's Hall or the Annex. Write to Miss Martha T. Fulton, 
Dean of Women. 

There are also good accommodations for women students in Mor- 
gantown homes. Miss Fulton will send an approved list to all who 
ask for her assistance. It is desirable to engage living accommoda- 
tions before coming to the Summer School. 

Women students arriving in Morgantown in the daytime should 
go first to Woman's Parlor, Woodburn Hall, unless they have already 
made arrangements for their living accommodations; those arriving 
at night should go to Woman's Annex, 247 Willey Street, where they 
will be taken care of until permanent arrangements for them can be 
made. 

Prospective Summer School students are urged to write directly 
to either Miss Fulton or Mr. Jones about rooming and boarding ac- 
commodations, rather than to the President of the University or to 
the Director of the Summer School. 

THE UNIVERSITY CAFETERIA. 

The new University Cafeteria will be operated during the Sum- 
mer Session for the benefit of Summer School students and will make 
it possible for them to obtain excellent meals at very low cost. The 
cafeteria is open to both men and women. 

COURSES IN EDUCATION. 

A greater number and variety of courses in education are offered 
in the Summer School this year than usual. These include courses in 
administration and supervision, high school and junior high school 



352 West Virginia University 

problems, normal school problems, educational psychology, tests and 
measurements, educational surveys and the history of education. 
Twenty^five courses are offered in all. 

COURSES FOR SPECIAL TEACHERS, 

A number of courses are offered in the Summer School for 
teachers of special subjects. These include courses in vocational ag- 
riculture, surveys of occupations, home economics, organization and 
administration of manual training, woodworking, metalworking, and 
public school music. 

DEMONSTRATION SCHOOL. 

The Demonstration School carried on in connection with the 
Summer Session will this year be illustrative of the "Dalton Plan," 
and will 'be organized and conducted under the leadership of Mr. 
Ernest Jackman (A.M. Columbia), Principal of the high school at 
Dalton, Massachusetts, the first secondary school to attempt the plan 
and the one that gave to that mode of procedure its now well-known 



Six grades corresponding to the arrangement of the ordinary 
junior-senior high school will be included in the organization; and 
simple curricula aimed to provide the maximum of elements identical 
with the usual secondary school situation will be provided. Opportu- 
nity will thus be offered to the students of education in the Summer 
Session to study the make-up and uses of the assignment, the work- 
shop method, means of measuring progress, and the schemes for 
forming small conference groups on the basis of varying speed. 

It is hoped that by this highly practical demonstration students 
of education in the Summer iS ess ion may obtain an adequate under- 
standing of the Dalton Plan and -be encouraged to apply its princi- 
ples advantageous to their educational situations. The Demonstra- 
tion school will be open during the first nine weeks of the Summer 
Session. 

COURSES IN RELIGIOUS EDUCATION. 

Courses in Religious Education will be offered during the first 
six weeks of the .Summer School. Albert J. Murphy, Professor o£ 
Religious Education in the University of Pittsburgh, will give these 
courses and will also have a conference hour in the afternoon at a 
time to be arranged. These courses are intended primarily for Sun- 
day School teachers, teachers of IBible in high schools and junior 
high schools, ministers, and other persons specially interested in the 



The Summer School 353 

problems of religious education. Professor Murphy is an expert in 
this field of instruction and it is expected that his courses will at- 
tract a considerable number of students. 

GRADUATE COURSES. 

An increasing number of students who attend the University 
Summer School are college graduates and come to work for graduate 
degrees. Most departments of the University, therefore, offer courses 
for graduate students. All courses listed in the University Catalogue 
and the Summer School Bulletin bearing double numbers, one num- 
ber being above one hundred, as well as all courses bearing single 
numbers above one hundred, except in the College of Engineering, 
may be pursued for graduate credit. 

OTHER COLLEGE COURSES. 

Practically all the departments of the University will be open. 
Courses will be offered in agriculture, geology, botany, zoology, 
physics, chemistry, medicine, law, engineering (including short 
courses in mining), education, English, mathematics, history, econom- 
ics, sociology, philosophy, psychology, Latin, German, French, Span- 
ish, home economics, music (including public school music), public 
speaking, journalism, and physical education for both men and women. 
College students may take work toward their degree as well in the 
Summer School as at any other time of the year. 

VESPER SERVICES. 

The School of Music faculty, under the direction of Louis Black, 
will give, as usual, a series of weekly music recitals during the first 
six weeks of the session every Thursday at 8:15 o'clock p. m. These 
recitals will be free, and open to the public. 

For further information about any feature of the Summer School, 
address the Director, 

L. L. FRIEND, 

Morgantown, W. Va. 
FRANK B. TROTTER, LL.D., 
President. 



The Division of Military 
Science and Tactics 



STAFF OF INSTRUCTION. 

LELAND S. DEVORE, Major, Infantry United States Army, Pro- 
fessor of Military Science and Tactics 

HUGH C. GILCHRIST, Captain, Infantry United States Army, 
Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics 

HOWARD J. GORMAN, 1 Captain, Infantry United States Army, 
Assistant Professor Military Science and Tactics 

ARTHUR R. WHITNER, Captain, Infantry United States Army, 
Assistant Professor Military Science and Tactics 

FRANK B. HASTIE, First Lieutenant, Engineer Corps United 
States Army, Assistant Professor Military Science and Tactics 

THOMAS F. KERN, First Lieutenant, Engineer Corps United 
States Army, Assistant Professor Military Science and Tactics 

HENRY T. SCHULTZ, Staff Sergeant, Engineer Corps United 
States Army, Assistant to Professor Military Science and 
Tactics 

WILLIAM H. RUSSELL, Staff Sergeant, Infantry United States 
Army, Assistant to Professor Military Science and Tactics 

HARLEY L. DEARBORN, Sergeant, D.E.M.L., Assistant to Pro- 
fessor of Military Science and Tactics 

JAMES H. WHITE, Second Lieutenant, Reserve Corps, Assistant 
to Professor of Military Science and Tactics 

EUGENE G. SMITH, Second Lieutenant, Engineer Reserve 
Corps, Assistant to the Professor of Military Science and Tactics 



West Virginia University being one of the beneficiaries of the 
Act of Congress of 1862, instruction in military tactics is made com- 
pulsory for the freshman and sophomore years. 

The Division is in charge of an officer of the United States 
Army, detailed by the War Department, as professor of military 
science and tactics. The Cadet Corps is inspected once each year by 
an officer of the General staff of the Army and several times during 
each year by the R. O. T. C. inspector Fifth Corps area. 

An Infantry Unit, Senior Division, of the Reserve Officers' 
Training Corps was established by the War Department on December 
12, 1916. An engineer unit was established in 1919. 



lDied, April, 1925. 



356 West Virginia University 

REQUIRED WORK IN MILITARY SCIENCE. 

Extract from Chapter Forty-five of the Code of West Virginia. 

Section 140. Military Training. Male students of suitable age 
in the university shall be required, under such regulations as the State 
Board of Education shall prescribe, to enroll in the department of 
military science. 'Said students shall serve for the time required by 
said regulations and shall be entitled to such special privileges and 
immunities as the State Board of Education may determine. The 
State Board of Education shall have authority to accept appropria- 
tions, material and other benefits from the Federal Government on 
account of any federal law providing for aid in the West Virginia 
University, for giving instruction in military science and to co-operate 
as far as practicable with the Federal Government for such purpose. 

Order of the State Board of Education. 

The following order has been adopted by the State Board of Edu- 
cation: 

(1) Ordered that all male students, with the exceptions herein- 
after named, enroll themselves in the Division of Military Science 
and follow diligently the course of instruction provided therein. 
Proficiency in this course shall be required for graduation. 

(2) Practical and theoretical instruction shall be given four 
hours per week throughout the school year to all students except 
those in the advanced classes who will be required to take five hours 
per week. A credit for one hour shall be given for each semester's 
work satisfactorily completed. Such credit shall be included in the 
computation of the student's standing at the end of each semester. 

(3) Every student enrolled in the Division of Military Science, 
shall at the time of his enlistment, deposit with the financial secretary 
of the University $10.00 to cover any loss or damage of books or 
government property occasioned through fault or neglect on the part 
of the cadet. This sum less such deductions as are made for lost 
property or other reasons will be refunded to the cadet at the expira- 
tion of the school term upon presentation to the financial secretary 
of certificate of property clearance. 

(4) The following classes of students shall not be required to 
enroll themselves in the Military Division, but may elect to do so: 

(i) All students who are citizens of a foreign country and do 
not intend to become citizens of the United States. 

(ii) All students who at date of entrance in the University are 
more than twenty-three years of age. 



The Summer School 357 

(iii) All graduate students. 

(iv) All students whose studies are entirely in the School of 
Music. 

(v) All students who are taking only the short course, or the 
special winter course, or agricultural extension work in the College 
of Agriculture. 

(vi) All students who at the time of their matriculation are 
classified as juniors or seniors in the various colleges, and all who 
have completed two years' service in the military division. 

(vii) All students who are physically unable to perform mili- 
tary duty. 

(5) A board, to be known as the military and gymnasium board, 
shall be composed of the commandant of cadets, the director of phy- 
sical training, and a surgeon of the corps of cadets, designated by 
the President. This board shall act upon claims for exemption from 
military service. 

(6) Students who claim exemption under any one of the first 
six cases must, within seven days after their registration in the 
University, present to the commandant, in writing, their request ac- 
companied by such evidence as is relied upon to support the request. 
A failure to make the request within the stated time shall bar the 
student from claiming exemption. 

(7) Applicants for exemption on the ground of physical dis- 
ability shall be carefully examined by a surgeon of the corps. A fee 
of one dollar to be paid to the examining surgeon shall be charged 
for such examination. 

(8) Students exempted under the seventh case shall, upon rec- 
ommendation of the military and gymnasium board be required to 
register for such physical training as they can take until they have 
earned a credit equal to that given for the prescribed military work. 

(9) In none of the preceding cases shall the student absent him- 
self until his application has been acted upon. 

(10) It shall be the duty of the commandant to notify the chair- 
man of the committee on classification and grades whether the mili- 
tary and gymnasium board exempts a student or recommends that 
he be required to register for other work in place of military drill. 

(1) Whenever the cause for exemption shall no longer exist, 
it shall be the duty of the student to present himself for drill at the 
next drill period. 

(12) Students may appeal from the decision of the commandant 
of cadets or the military and gymnasium board, in which case the 
appeal shall be decided by the council of administration. 



358 West Virginia University 

(13) All cadet officers taking military instruction as an elective 
shall be, as to their tuition fees, on the same basis as State cadets. 

Other Regulations Concerning Cadets. 

(1) A uniform for each cadet is furnished by the Government. 
The cadet is required to wear this uniform at drill and instruction. 

(2) Cadets who are bona fide residents of West Virginia are 
known as State cadets. A State cadet is allowed free stationery and 
the use of text 'books to the value of $10.00 a year. If he graduates 
from any department of the University while a member of the cadet 
corps he is allowed to retain his text-books. 

(3) Cadets who are members of the military band receive the 
same allowances as State cadets. 

SPECIAL REWARDS FOR MILITARY EXCELLENCE. 

The names of the most distinguished cadets of the graduating 
class are sent to the Adjutant General of the Army and to the Adju- 
tant General of the State. 

All graduates of the Military Division are eligible, within five 
years after graduation, to commission as first lieutenants in the 
Organized Militia of the .State, without examination. 

The ;State Board of Regents offers the following medals as special 
rewards for excellence in military training: 

(1) To the cadet having the highest record for shooting on the 
University Rifle team, a gold medal; (2) to the cadet having the 
second highest record for 'shooting on the University Rifle team, a 
silver medal; (3) To the cadet having the highest aggregate score at 
Company Team Rifle Competition, a gold medal; (4) To the cadet 
having the best record for Military Training and Discipline, a gold 
medal; (<5) To the cadet who shall write the best essay on preparation 
against war, fifty dollars. 

Through the kidness of Mr. George C. Baker, of Morgantown, 
medals are offered to the two best trained privates in the corps. 
Both the military record for the year and the marks in the competi- 
tive drills of commencement week will be used in determining the 
award. 

ARMORY. 

The Armory (60 by 120 feet) is used as a drill hall during inclem- 
ent weather. This building is the home of the cadet corps, and all 
entertainments, given by them are held therein, under the supervision 
of the Commandant of Cadets. 



The Summer School 359 

MILITARY BAND. 

A military band of sixty pieces is maintained as a part of the 
Cadet Corps. Band instruments are furnished by the Government and 
instruction is given in band music. Band cadets are also instructed 
in military drill to include the school of the soldier and of the squad. 

ADMINISTRATION AND INSTRUCTION. 

For the purpose of administration and drill the Cadet Corps is 
organized as a Battalion of infantry: Field Staff, Band and four 
companies. 

The work in military science is taken in connection with other 
University work, and requires about four hours each week. The 
course of instruction is intended to fit all who graduate therein to 
perform efficiently the duties of officers in the Officers' Reserve 
Corps, the Organized Militia of West Virginia, or of volunteers. The 
winter months are devoted to theoretical instruction in tactics and 
other military subjects, together with practical instruction in drill 
and in gallery practice. 



Candidates for Degrees 

Fifty-seventh Annual Commencement, June 3, 1924. 



MASTER OF ARTS. 

Joseph Allen Ayers Weston 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1917. 

William Wiley Givens Keenan 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1915. 

Margaret Anne Haines Fayette City, Pa. 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1922. 

William Clyde Hertzog Shinnston 

A.B., Salem College. 

George David Hott Morgantown 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1923. 

Mildred Matilda Hutchinson . . . Welch 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1922. 

Adah Lee Mapel Morgantown 

A.B., Beaver College. 

Sidney Lamont McGee Morgantown 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1922. 

Leota Owens Rosemont 

A.B., West Virginia Wesleyan College, 1918. 

John Earl Peters Athens 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1923. 

Edith Marion Stevens Morgantown 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1921. 

Harry Jeremiah Stuckey Hedgesville 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1916. 

Mary Gail Tyree Elkins 

A.B., Davis and Elkins College. 

Walter Vance Roaring 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1917. 

Flora Felton Zimmerman Morgantown 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1920. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE. 
Harry Hill Clayton 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1922. 

Victorian Sivertz Morgantown 

B.S., University of Washington, 1922. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING. 

Clarence Russell Mahaney .... Morgantown 

B.S.Ch.E., West Virginia University, 1923. 



362 West Virginia University 

CIVIL ENGINEER. 

Halleck McGinnis Scott Beckley 

B.S.C.E., West Virginia University, 1909. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEER 

Thomas Witt Fitzgerald Atlanta, Ga. 

B.S.M.E., West Virginia University, 1909. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURE. 

James Marshall DePue Spencer 

B.S.Agr., West Virginia University ,1922. 

Joseph Brashear Dixon Morgantown 

B.S.Agr., West Virginia University, 1922. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS. 

Katie Belle Abney Charleston 

Mary Louise Bennett Morgantown 

Marguerite Bowers Carrollton, Mo. 

Chauncey Hoyt Browning ..... Logan 

Bonnie Beva Bush Cox's Mills 

Jennie Lenore Cairns Charleston 

Mary Blanche Campbell Morgantown 

Robert Glenn Carey Toronto, Ohio 

Chesney Michael Carney Wheeling 

Edith Francis Castleberry Huntington 

Dorothy Virginia Church Grafton 

Asa Clark Morgantown 

Virginia Crawford Sistersville 

Paul Jones Daughenbaugh Thomas 

Antonio Petrillo DiMaria Manyaka 

Robert Tucker Donley Morgantown 

Theresa Averil Dower Point Pleasant 

Helen Louise Edmondson ..... Morgantown 

Arline Isis England Charleston 

Eugene Charles Etz Wheeling 

Milton Carr Ferguson . . . . . . Huntington 

Dana Earl Fisher Morgantown 

Mary Elizabeth Fisher ...... Sutton 

Florence Rosalyn Fleming .... Grafton 

Alton Ree Fortney Thomas 

Edward Metcalf George Wellsburg 

Bertha Irene Gidley Morgantown 

Clella Maude Gifford Wilsonburg 

Lavie Anice Gott Princeton 



Candidates for Degrees 36, 

Joseph William Greer Fairmont 

Norvell Leonard Haislip Wheeling 

Grace Hale Weston 

Stephen Harrick Punxsutawney, Pa. 

Leona Lyle Hatcher Beckley 

Myrtle Vance Hayes Morgantown 

Arthur Benedict Hechmer Grafton 

Glenna Elizabeth Hedrick .... Alderson 

John Franklin Heflin West Union 

George Dana Herold Summersville 

Areta Eudora Hicks Webster Springs 

Virginia Ruth Hines . . * Sutton 

Scott Hough Wellsburg 

Eva Florence Hughes Parkersburg 

Mabel Pemberton Humphreys .... Morgantown 

Frank Robert Jamison Fairmont 

Georgia Garnet Jamison Morgantown 

June Lilly John Morgantown 

Carl Edward Johnson Thomas 

Gladys Johnson Alderson 

Russell Ruddell Johnson Fairmont 

Sarah Herma Johnson Kenova 

Earl Francis Johnston Morgantown 

Ruth Helene Johnston Morgantown 

Geraldine Kane Weston 

John Kaylor, Jr Graham Station 

Oliver Dennis Kessel Ripley 

George Thomas Knode Shepherdstown 

Kenneth Swan Kurtz Weston 

James Tamplin Laing Charleston 

Rebecca Louise Lashley Cumberland, Md. 

Bert Gray Lawrence Maybeury 

Lena Lawson Williamson 

Edis Eleanor Lazear Mannington 

Jane Florence Lazenby Princeton 

Anna Virginia Lewis Morgantown 

Charles Marion Love, Jr Huntington 

Martha Madeira Morgantown 

Lucille Josephine Mathews .... Charleston 

Wayne Eldon Mason Moundsville 

Lena Griffin McBee Morgantown 

Alice Virginia McGranahan .... Wheeling 

Herbert Joseph McMurrer Charleston 

Tencie Pauline McNinch Moundsville 

Zelma Mercer Moundsville 



364 West Virginia University 

Jamison Meredith Charleston 

Jessie Harper Meredith Fairmont 

Mildred Ann .Meredith Fairmont 

Mary Virginia Michael Martinsburg 

Mary Maywood Milligan Saint Albans 

Fred Oscar Mitchell Welch 

Mary Susan Montgomery Kingwood 

Mary Vivian Morton Webster Springs 

Rachel Estella Newell Chester 

Marjorie Willard Osborne . . . . . . Davis 

Catharine Little Palmer Poughkeepsie, N. 

Daniel Henry Perdue * Swichback 

Geneva Gladys Beck Pfost Morgantown 

Hale Judson Posten Morgantown 

Lillian Posten Morgantown 

Lucy Hutter Ragland Beckley 

Colin Wyland Reith Morgantown 

Edytha Annie Rierson Bluefield 

Lillian Elaine Rinard Grafton 

Ola Robbins Mannington 

Hazel Van Dyke Roberts Elizabeth 

William Ernest Roberts Saint Albans 

Hettye Marian Robertson ..... Beckley 

Lucy Burton Rossey Athens 

estelle rowe morgantown 

Helen Beatrice Rufener Morgantown 

Joseph Whitney Savage Charleston 

Evelyn Sue Shaid Elkins 

Florence Ann Shaid Elkins 

Mary Marshall Shirley Union 

Henrietta Margaret Shore Keyser 

Ruth Olive Smith Grafton 

Thomas Edgar Springer Fairmont 

Harold Eugene Starcher Ripley 

Susan Frances Stavely Grafton 

Hazel Roberts Straight Mannington 

Rual Bower Swiger Fairmont 

Edward Strickler Talbott Philippi 

Harry Reeves Taylor Keyser 

Genevieve Tierney Weston 

Walter Howard Vickers Morgantown 

Jane Russell Walker Welllsburg 

Paul Blackburn Ware Philippi 

Paul William Watson Tunnelton 

Sara Morgan Watts Fairmont 



Candidates for Degrees 365 

Charles Edward Weakley, Jr. . . . Morgantown 

Mary McKinney Weaver Morgantown 

Dorothy Stone White Morgantown 

James Horn White Richwood 

Lyall Luther White Morgantown 

Margaret Katherine Wieda .... Moundsville • 

Madelyn Williams Welch 

Veta Lee Williams Morgantown 

Varina Maree Wilson Hinton 

Rose Jean Wolfe Morgantown 

Carey Woofter Dekalb 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE. 

Raymond Evan Bailey Hamlin 

Douglas Joseph Barry Beacon, N. Y. 

James William Stanton Calvert . . Morgantown 

Charles Dewey Crandall Parkersburg 

Newman Houghton Dyer Morgantown 

Paul Menton Eicks Belmar, N. J. 

Jose Forastieri Caguas, P. R. 

Kent Kato Hammond West Union 

Roscoe R., Hansford Mount Clare, Pa. 

Harold Charles Harper Wheeling 

John Gibson Hill Charleroi, Pa. 

Abraham Julius Hollander Brooklyn, N. Y. 

George Bernard Hudock Oliver, Pa. 

Philip Johnson Ronceverte 

Benjamin Kaufman New York, N. Y. 

Harry Chauncey Kendall Morgantown 

William Joseph Killius Johnstown, Pa. 

Max Kliger New York, N. Y. 

John Alexander Krosnoff Cokeburg, Pa. 

Paul David Luckey Morgantown 

Louis Julius Marcus Cleveland, Ohio 

John William Marsh Warwood 

John Alexander McCurdy Elm Grove 

Azby Alexander Milburn Bellepoint 

Hu Crim Myers Philippi 

Harry Nemens New York, N. Y. 

John Wylie Pyles New Martinsville 

Thomas Godfrey Reed Moorefield 

Roy McKinley Rhodes Williamson 

Harry West Rollings, Jr Lost City 

E manual Roth Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Joseph "Kins Rowland Mona 



366 West Virginia University 

Simon Young Saltman Manhattan, N. Y. 

Francis Harold Stoup Valencia, Pa. 

Ersie Van Teagarden Cameron 

Severo Torruellas Caguas, P. It. 

William Frank Work ....... Blue Creek 

Harold Glynn Young Moundsville 

GRADUATE IN PHARMACY. 

Harold George Brannen Benwood 

Dawson Elmer Cooper Hinton 

Herman Ellsworth Deem . . . . . Parkersburg 

Robert Reginald Hamilton Punxsutawney, Pa. 

Gordon Floyd Hutchison ..... New Martinsville 

John Wesley Miller Webster Springs 

Robert Joseph Mlekush Thomas 

Uriah Newton Orr Kingwood 

Cecil Lyle Ramsey Fayetteville 

Donald Edward Teets Baltimore, Md. 

Glenn Chisholm Weber Saint Marys 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHARMACY. 

Paul Edmund Hager Charleston 

BACHELOR OF LAWS. 

James Lee Anderson Littleton 

James Francis Burns Fairmont 

Everett Lewis Dodrill ...... Morgantown 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1923. 

John Dixon Downes Buckhannon 

Coleman Alexander Hatfield .... Morgantown 

Bernard Leo Hess Clarksburg 

Harold Clare Hess Mannington 

William Bruce Hoff Parkersburg 

William McKinley Holroyd .... Athens 

Kathryn Virginia Jenkins Morgantown 

Edmund Marshall New Cumberland 

William Deles McCauley Moorefield 

William Otto Orr Morgantown 

Forrest Blanchard Poling Philippi 

Dayton Reuben Stemple Philippi 

Roscoe Shirley Taylor Morgantown 

Howard Jesse Wadsworth Morgantown 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1923. 

John Paul Yost Pontiac, III. 

Ph.B., University of Chicago, 1920. 



Candidates for Degrees 367 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

Virgil Franklin Bowyer White Sulphur Spr'gs 

Randolph Henry Butts Wheeling 

Charles Stephenson Carden .... Weston 

James Carlos Evans Kermit 

Ralph Herman Hall Harrisville 

Paul Amos Smith West Union 

Harry Holferstay Stephens .... Martinsburg 

Lawrence Joseph Weiler Morgantown 

Clyde Vickers Whjte Morgantown 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

Estil Leroy Ayers Piedmont 

Harold Guilford Dudley Sistersville 

Burhyl Tilman Henry Morgantown 

Joseph Lawrence Pugh Morgantown 

Herman Bee Riggle Middlebourne 

Harold Engle Riggle Middlebourne 

Harold William Rodgers Clarksburg 

Karl Frederick Sommer Sutton 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 

Nicholas Barone Holiday's Cove 

Robert Hayes Boyers Morgantown 

Oral Ala Brown Stout's Mills 

James Samuel Copley Logan 

Charles Norman Davis Morgantown 

Stine Roland Hall Parkersburg 

Charles Edgar Hutchinson .... Morgantown 

Reuben Lee Riley 

Guy Arthur Moffett Weston 

Ira Odell Myers Grafton 

Robert Kirk Park Ravenswood 

Ira Albert Pitsenberger Pool 

Lloyd Garrison Porter Oak Hill 

Griffith Cyril Pugh Morgantown 

Charles Snyder Hundred 

William Grafton Steele Wheeling 

Lee Douglas Tabler Martinsburg 

Arnold Austin Winter Saint Albans 



368 West Virginia University 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING. 

Joseph Bekenstein Charleston 

Frank Burdette Lewisburg 

Wayne Zearley Friend ...... Charleston 

John Paul Jones Fairmont 

Lester Henderson Kincaid . . . . . Ramsey 

Paul Benton Selbe Saint Albans 

Randolph Chillian Specht Saint Albans 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING OF MINES. 

John Lewis Orr Clarksburg 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION. 

John William Sander Wheeling 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE. 

Walton Allen Carney Middleport, Ohio 

Stewart Eagan Ronceverte 

John Boyles Hallam McKeesport, Pa. 

William Brew Hopke Grafton 

David Francis Wayt West Liberty 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURE. 

Orin Jennings Beard Point Pleasant 

James Sterling Bobbitt Almoris 

Clyde Bonar Belleville 

Leland Booth Belington 

Arlo Bowlby Carroll Morgantown 

Raymond Lewis Dennison Wallace 

Luke Wright Frame Morgantown 

William McKinley Garrison .... Moundsville 

John Lynn Hare Morgantown 

Percy Camden Karickhoff Buckhannon 

Virginia Lee Maxwell ...... Buckhannon 

Paul Edgar McCoy Letart 

Floyd McDaniel Morgantown 

Eddie Brison Phares Riverton 

James Robert Porter Weston 

Charles Sanford Price Morgantown 

Bernard Frederick Ramsburg . . . Weston 

Hosea Ralph Rymer Harrisville 

Lloyd Carlton Shomaker Morgantown 



Candidates for Degrees 369 

John James Shore, Jr Parkersburg 

Alexander Walker Short, Jr Ashland, Ky. 

Sherman Smith Morgantown 

Arthur Gail Snyder Sabraton 

French Steele Saint Marys 

Glenn Merrill Wright Core 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HOME ECONOMICS 

Anna Elizabeth Baird Elm Grove 

Katie Kennedy Baker Sabraton 

Nina Elizabeth Hall Spencer 

Edith Barnes Morgantown 

Madelon Virginia Blatchford .... Belington 

Eva Gertrude Boggs ....... Big Otter 

Virginia Maude Browning Morgantown 

Mary Hope Bush Cox's Mills 

Winnie Elizabeth Gorman Morgantown 

Amy Catherine Graham Fairmont 

Wilda Beatrice Hoard Morgantown 

Pauline McMillen Moundsville 

Lesta Howard Megrail Morgantown 

Eleanor Shafer Miller Terra Alta 

Mabelle Alma Patton Gap Mills 

Frances Elizabeth Reynolds .... Grape Island 

Pearl Alda Risher Morgantown 

Alberta Viola Schramm Keyser 

Mary Jeannette Schultz Morgantown 

Gladys May Scranage Grafton 

Francis Catherine Sprigg Holly 

Elsie Bartlett Swecker Morgantown 

Edna Virginia Tarleton Watson 

Gladys Twyla Ward Charleston 

Beuna Madge Williams Bridgeport 

ARTIST'S DIPLOMAS, VOICE. 

Gail Elizabeth Muhlman New Martinsville 

ARTIST'S DIPLOMA, PIANO 

Isabelle Alberta Bevington .... Morgantown 

Ralph West Federer Morgantown 

Ruth Fairfax Parker Morgantown 



370 West Virginia University 

TEACHER'S CERTIFICATE, PIANO 

Fonda Valera Hall Morgantown 

Ethel Gordon Murrill Huntington 

Clara Ernestine Reed Morgantown 

Elizabeth Estelle Reed Morgantown 

TEACHER'S CERTIFICATE, PUBLIC SChIoOL MUSIC 

Elma Pearle Gregory Cowen 

Cecilla Elvadele James Follansbee 

Minerva Douglas Lawson Elkins 

Katharine Audree Moore Fairmont 

Ruth Fairfax Parker Morgantown 



Candidates for Degrees 



Summer School. 1 924 



MASTER OF ARTS. 

William Emmett Buckey Fairmont 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1921. 

Alma Grace Eaton Morgantown 

A.B., Blackburn College, 1916. 

Strauss Reger Wood Reader 

A.B., Bethany College, 1919. 

Florence Anna Wright Cameron 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1916. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURE. 

Kyle Chester Westover Morgantown 

B.S., New Hampshire College, 1917. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS. 

Thomas Tess Callaghan Craigsville 

Ida Virginia Carter Elm Grove 

Berlin Basil Chapman Webster Springs 

Vannetta Chambers Martinsburg 

Mildred Frances Cody Elkins 

Earl Leora Dailey Morgantown 

Eunice Pennington Dolley Gastonia, N. C. 

Edward Enigson Morgantown 

Elizabeth Louise Fanagan Huntington 

Helen Elizabeth Hunter Morgantown 

Matilda Lorentz McMechen 

Stefani Roesch Lowther Morgantown 

Mary Eilleen McNeill Morgantown 

Wilda Lea Montgomery Morgantown 

William Taylor Reed Morgantown 

Hiram Kent Sine Blacksville 

Alexander Stout Clarksburg 

Ruth Strieby Elkins 

Forrest Noble Stuckey Martinsburg 

William Calvin Washington .... Morgantown 

John Robert Waters, Jr Elkins 

lThe students named below completed the work required for their respective de- 
grees during the summer school session but their diplomas bear the date of June 
3, 1924, and they are regarded as members of the graduating class of 1924. 



372 West Virginia University 

Gladys Snyder Waugh . . . . . . Morgantown 

Harry Dean Wilfong Glenville 

Maurice Kenneth Wilcox West Union 

johnathan hollis wllson blaine 

Ethel Fae Wright Cameron 

Russell Eshmel Wright Monongah 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE. 

Raymond Haile Curry ...*.... Hamlin 

Harry Sidney Rosenberg New York, N. Y. 

Craman Ira Martin Maysville 

Eugene Joel Schachter North Braddock, Pa. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

Hobart Graham Shrewsbury .... Charleston 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Raymond Jefferson Tennant .... Morgantown 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING OF MINES. 

Joseph Louis Setron Parkersburg 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURE. 

Manual Alvarez Caguas, P. R. 

Theodoric Edwards Bland Weston 

Hubert Beryl Davis Weston 

William Gleen Fisher Flatwoods 

George Russell Gimbert Oceana, Va. 

Thomas Carlyle Martin Morgantown 

Paul Noble Shafer Independence 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HOME ECONOMICS. 

Emily Josephine Morgan Morgantown 



Address List of Faculty and Staff 



NOTE : The date following the name indicates the year of appointment to the 
present position. When a second date is given it indictes the year of first appoint- 
ment on the University staff. The telephone number follows the Morgantown street 
address. 

ABBOTT, ELIZABETH B., Preceptress of the Woman's Hall Annex; 
1923; 1919; 247 Willey Street; 258. 

ALLEN, HOWARD BUSHNELL, M.S., (Cornell 1920); Associate 
Professor of Agricultural Education; 1920; 347 Price Avenue; 
1127R. 

AMBLER, CHARLES HENRY, Ph.D., (Wisconsin 1908); Professor 
of History; 1920; 1917; 128 Simpson Street; 1450J. 

AMIDON, LEE LEONARD, B.S.M.E., (Minnesota 1923); Instructor 
in Steam and Experimental Engineering; 1923; 21 Wilson Ave- 
nue; 571J. 

AMMONS, NELLIE PERREL, A.B., (W. V. U. 1917); Instructor in 
Botany; 1920; 547 Hunt Street; 221M. 

ANDREWS, EDGAR LEWIS, B.S.Agr., (Cornell 1898); Associate 
Professor of Poultry Husbandry; 1917; 1913; North Willey 
Street; 880M. 

ANGELO, ERNEST, B.S.Agr., (W. V. U. 1919); Instructor in Horti- 
culture and Assistant Horticulturist in the Experiment Station; 
1919; 285 Richwood Avenue; 1361M. 

ANTHONY, ERNEST LEE, M.S., (University of Pennsylvania 1914) ; 
Professor of Dairy Husbandry and Head of the Department of 
Dairy Husbandry in the Experiment Station; 1919; State Dairy 
Farm; 514R. 

ARMENTROUT, WALTER W., B.S.Agr., (University of Tennessee); 
Instructor in Farm Economics; on leave of absence. 

ARMSTRONG, ROBERT ALLEN, A.M., (Harvard 1903); L.H.D.; 
Professor of English Language and Literature; Head of Depart- 
ment of English; 1903; 1893; 732 College Avenue; 29R. 

ARNETT, LONNA DENNIS, Ph.D., (Clark University 1903); Librar- 
ian; 1910; 11 Grant Avenue; 368R. 

ARRINGTON, WINFREE LLOYD, Instructor in Mining Extension; 
1924; Hot Coal, West Virginia. 

ATKESON, THOMAS CLARK, Ph.D., (Central Normal College 
1891); Professor of Animal Husbandry, Emeritus; 1914; Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

ATWOOD, HORACE, M.S.Agr., (Cornell 1893); Poultryman, Exper- 
iment Station; 1916; 1897; 110 Charles Avenue; 455J. 

BAILEY, RAYMOND, B.S., (W. V. U. 1924); Instructor in Anatomy; 

1924; 312 Cobun Avenue; 292. 
BAIRD. JOSIAH WALLACE, Student Assistant in Dairy Husbandry; 

1924; 461 Virginia Avenue. 
BANCROFT, GEORGE RUSSELL, Ph.D., (Yale. 1917); Professor of 

Medicine; 1920; 1923; 26 Lincoln Avenue; 654 J. 
BARBE, WAITMAN, A.M., (W. V. U. 1890); Litt.D.; Director of the 

Summer School and Professor of English; 1911; 1895; Anderson 

Place; 308J. 



374 West Virginia University 

BARCLAY, BERTRAM D., B.S., (Wooster, 1923); Instructor in 
Botany; 1924; '281 Franklin Street; 259 J. 

BARKER, MYRON IRVING, A.B., (Cornell, 1923); Instructor in 
Romance Languages; 1924; Faculty Club; 12R. 

BARTLETT, JOHN FRANK, Student Assistant in Chemistry; 1923; 
308 First Street; 1756. 

BELL, EUGENE WILLIAM, Instructor in Mining Extension; 1923; 
Mordue, W. Va. 

BERG, ANTHONY, M.S., (Wisconsin, 1922) ; Assistant Plant Path- 
ologist, Experiment Station; 1913. 

BERIGY, GORDON ALGER, Ph.C, M.)S,, (-Michigan, 1916); Profes- 
sor of Pharmacy; 1921; 1916; 308 Park Street; 1166R. 

BEYER, EDITH WILSON, R.N., (Jefferson Medical College Hos- 
pital); University Nurse; 1923; University Health Center; 475. 

BINNS, THOiMAlS JOHN, Instructor in Mining Extension; 1923; 
Pemberton, W. Va. 

BISHOP, CHARLES EDWARD, Ph.D., (Leipsic, 1889); Professor of 
Greek Language and Literature; 1911; 191 McLane Avenue; 1654. 

BLACK, ETHEL BORDEN, (New England Conservatory of Music, 
1901); Instructor in Piano; 1917; 109 McLane Avenue; 495. 

BLACK, LOUIS, Director of the School of Music; 1909; 109 McLane 
Avenue; 495. 

BLUMENBERG, HUGO, Student Assistant in Economics; 1924; 80 
iS. High Street; 865R. 

BOOMSLITER, GEORGE PAUL, M.1S., (Illinois, 1914) ; Professor of 
Mechanics; 1920; 21 Wilson Avenue; 571 J. 

BONAR, MARTIN LOXLEY, M.D., (Western Reserve, 1918); Pro- 
fessor of Pharmacology; 1920; R. F. D. 4; 12F4. 

BOONE, ROY ELLIOTT, Student Assistant in Chemistry; 1923; 23 
'Naomi Street; 1307W. 

BOUGHNER, JENNIE) DELAWDER, A.B., (W. V. U., 1912); Assist- 
ant Librarian; 1915; 705 North Willey; 984J. 

BOURNE, WARREN SCU/DDER, A.B., (W. V. U., 1923); Assistant in 
Zoology; 1922; 14 Jacobs Street. 

BRAY, CHARLES MeCHESNEY, M.D., (Western Reserve, 1918); 
Instructor in Physical Diagnosis; 1919; Euclid Avenue; office 
telephone, 1233. 

BROOKS, OHANDLEiR LINN, (Superintendent of Buildings and 
Grounds; 1917; 779 North Front iStreet; 311W. 

BROWN, SAMUEL BOARDMAN, A.M., (W. V. U., 1886); Professor 
of Geology and Mineralogy; 1892; 1890; 640 North High Street; 
796J. 

BROWN, SHERMAN WILLIAM, M.A., (Oberlin, 1924); Instructor 
in Spanish; 1924; Faculty Club; 12R. 

BROWN, WILLIAM JAMES, Student Assistant in Chemistry; 1923; 
261 East Prospect Street; 801R. 

BUCHANAN, MARGARET, Ph.D.. (Bryn Mawr, 1922); Assistant 
Professor of Mathematics; 1922; 145 Waitman (Street; 1557J. 

BUCHANAN, PAUL (STUART, A.B., (Wooster, 1917); Instructor in 
Public Speaking; Stewart Street; 1022J. 

BUTLER, KATHARINE, B.A., (Mt. Holyoke, 1920); General Secre- 
tary Young Women's Christian Association; 1923; 5 Forest Ave- 
nue; 862 J. 

BUTMAN, MARGARET ELIZABETH, (New England Conservatory, 
1914); Instructor in Piano; 1922; 12 Hunt Street; 1109R. 



Address List of Faculty 375 

CALLAGHAN, EULAI BROOKS, Student Assistant in Chemistry; 

1924; 2141 University Avenue; 1395J. 

CALLAHAN, JAMES MORTON, Ph.D., (Johns Hopkins, 1897); Pro- 
fessor of History and Political Science and Dean of the College 
of Arts and Sciences; 1916; 1902; 632 Snruce Street; 1488R. 

CALVERT, EVERLY G., Assistant in Mechanical Engineering; 1922; 
326 Jefferson Street. 

CAMPBELL, JOHN F., B.S., (Rutgers, 1921); Field Instructor, U. S. 
Veterans' Bureau; 1923; 316 S. Second Street, Clarksburg, W. Va. 

CANNADAY, CHARLES BENTON, A.M., (Roanoke College, 1898); 
Professor of Latin; 1916; 1914; 227 Hagan's Avenue; 1167R. 

CARL WILLIAM JOHN, Instructor in Foundry Practice; 1920; 107 
Green Street; 1042R. 

CARLIN, LEO, A.B., LL.B., (W. V. U., 1909, 1910); Professor of 
Law; 1920; 1916; 27 Wilson Avenue; 282R. 

CARPENTER, LEWIS VAN, B.S.C.E., (W. V. U., 1918); Instructor 
in Structural and Hydraulic Engineering; 1923; 225 Price Street; 
1628R. 

CARROLL, ARLO BOWLBY, B.S.Agr., Field Instructor, U. S. Vet- 
erans' Bureau; Cheat Haven, Pa. 

CARNEY, EMERSON, Manager University Book Store; 1923; 237 
Richwood Avenue; 65 J. 

CARTER, IDA VIRGINIA, Assistant Librarian; 1923; 200 McLane 
Avenue; 715R. 

CATHER, CARL HENRY, M.S., (Illinois, 1922); Assistant Professor 
of Mechanics; 1924; 1916; Price Street; 1230J. 

CATHER, HAROLD MALCOLM, M.S.M.E., (Texas A. and M. Col- 
lege, 1917); Instructor in Drawing; 1919; 446 Spruce Street; 
1489J. 

CAVLNS, LORIMER VICTOR, Ph.D., (Chicago, 1924); Professor of 
Education; 1919; 508 Grand Street; 411. 

CHAPPELL, LOUIS WATSON, M.A., (University of Virginia, 1921); 
Instructor in English; 1922; 101 Richwood Avenue. 

CHIDESTER, FLOYD EARLE, Ph.D., (Clark University, 1911); Pro- 
fessor of Zoology; 1923; 1919; 329 Demain Avenue; 923J. 

CHITWOOD, OLIVER PERRY, Ph.D., (Johns Hopkins, 1902); Pro- 
fessor of History; 1907: 312 Park Street; 683W. 

CLARK, FRIEND EBENEZER, Ph.D., (Johns Hopkins, 1902); Pro- 
fessor of Chemistry; 1914; 649 Spruce Street; 830J. 

COCHRANE, THOMAS JOSEPH, B.S., (New Hampshire, 1919); 
Junior Chemist, Agricultural Experiment Station; 1920; 145 
Waitman Street; 1557J. 

COCHRANE, ISABELLE LOWE, B.S., (Columbia, 1922); Instructor 
in Home Economics: 145 Waitman Street; 1557J. 

COLLETT, ARMAND RENE, Ph.D., (Yale, 1923); Instructor in 
Chemistry; 1924; 1090 Charles Avenue; 455 J. 

COLWELL, RACHEL HARTSHORN, M.A., (Columbia, 1905); Pro- 
fessor of Home Economics; 1920; 1910; 1464 University Avenue; 
812M. 

COLWELL, ROBERT CAMERON, Ph.D., (Princeton, 1819); Profes- 
sor of Physics; 1924; 1918; 332 Demain Avenue: 885 J. 

CONLEY, J. D., Superintendent of the Livestock Farm; Stewarts- 
town Road; 10F22. 

COOPER, THEODORE, Student Assistant in Zoology; 1924; 504 
Hi2-h Street: 1414R. 

CORNELL, FERRIS DEWEY, JR., M.S., (Cornell, 1923); Instructor 
in Farm Mechanics; 1921; 19 McLane Avenue; 1219. 



376 West Virginia University 

COX, JOHN HARRINGTON, Ph.D., (Harvard, 1923); Professor of 
English Philology; 1904; 1902; 34 Campus Drive; 563J. 

COX, JANE, Student Assistant in Psychology; 1924; 230 Kirk Street; 
1204. 

CRAIG, FRANK WALDO, B.S.Agr., (W. V. U., 1923); Assistant in 
Entomology; 1924; 521 Locust Avenue; 1489W. 

CRANE, DEE, Potato Specialist, Agricultural Extension staff; 1917; 
Jaco'b Street; 804 J. 

CRANE, HARLEY LUCIUS, M.S.Agr., (W. V. U., 1918); Associate 
Professor of Horticulture and Associate Horticulturist, Experi- 
ment Station; 1920; 1914; 508 Jefferson Street; 1199W. 

CRAWFORD, ADAM, Assistant Director of Mining Extension; 1923; 
1920; 258 First Street; 869J. 

CRAWFORD, THOMAS STEPHEN, .Student Assistant in Mathe- 
matics; 1924; 305 Stewart Street; 869J, 

CREECH, BENJAMIN FRANKLIN, B.S.Agr., (University of Ken- 
tucky, 1917) ; Live Stock Specialist, Agricultural Extension 
Staff; 1919; 184 Spruce Street; 1663. 

CUNNINGHAM, HOLBY ESTIL, Ph.D., (Chicago, 1918); Professor 
of Philosophy; 1923; Faculty Club; 12R. 

CUjRRENCE, TROY MANSELL, BJS.Agr., (W. V. U., 1923); In- 
structor in Horticulture; 495 High Street; 12R. 

CURRY, RAYMOND HAILE, (B.S., (W. V. U., 1924) ; Instructor in 
Pathology and Bacteriology; 1924; 343 Prospect Street; 982R. 

DADTSMAN, ANDREW JACKSON, Ph.D., (Cornell, 1924); Professor 
of Rural Economics and Farm Management and Farm Economist, 
Experiment Station; 1924; 1916; 305 Beverly Avenue; 873J. 

DARBY, ARLEIGH LEE, A.M., (Waynesburg College, 1904); Pro- 
fessor of French and Italian; 1920; 1910; 487 High Street; 833J. 

DAVIES, EARL CLAUDIUS HAMILTON, Ph.D., (Chicago, 1917); 
Associate Professor of Chemistry; 1920; 255 Richwood Avenue; 
435J. 

DAVIS, ROLAND PARKER, MJC.E., Ph.D., (Cornell, 1908, 1914); 
Professor of 'Structural and Hydraulic Engineering; 1912; 1911; 
333 Demain Avenue; 263 J. 

DAVIS, HANNIBAL ALBERT, A.B., (W. V. U., 1923); Assistant in 
Mathematics; 461 Virginia Avenue. 

DEAHL, JASPER NEWTON, Ph.D., (£olum!bia, 1906) ; Professor of 
Education; 1901; 442 Park Street; 1168J. 

DEAHL, KENNETH, Student Assistant in Surveying; 1923; 2126 
University Avenue. 

DEARBOR*N, HARLEY L., Sergeant U. iS. Infantry (D.E.M.L.); As- 
sistant to Professor of Military Science and Tactics; 1921; 14 
McLane Avenue. 

DEATIRICK, LILY BELL SEIFTON, Ph.D., (Ohio State, 1921); As- 
sistant Professor of Chemistry; 1920; on leave of absence. 

DEATRICK, EUGENE PEYTON, Ph.D., (Cornell, 1917); Associate 
Professor of Soils and Soil Technologist, Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station; 1921; Stewartstown Road; 10F14. 

DEILLIiGATTI, FRANK, (Royal Conservatory, Naples, 1919); In- 
structor in Violin and Ensemble; 1923; Waitman Street. 

DEVORE, LELAND S., Major Infantry U. S. A. (D.O.L.) 
(U. S. M. A., 1913); Professor of Military Science and Tactics 
and Commandant of Cadets; 1923; 308 Morris Street; 1319R. 



Address List of Faculty ^7 

DICKINSON, EDMUND CHARLES, A.B., (Earlham College, 1903); 

J.D., ('Michigan, 1911); Professor of Law; 1921; 58 Campus 

Drive; 319 J. 
DILLE, LUCY BELTZHOOVER, Assistant in Vocal Music; 1921; 

245 Pleasant Street; 848R. 
DODD, DAVID ROLLIN, B.SAgr., (W. V. U., 1014); Agronomy 

Specialist, Agricultural Extension Staff; 1919; 59 Maple Avenue; 

681W. 
DODDS, GIDEON STANHOPE, Ph.D., (University of Pennsylvania, 

1910); Associate Professor of Histology and Embryology; 1920; 

1918; 15 Brown Street; 1267R. 
DORSEY, MAXWELL JAY, Ph.D., (Cornell, 1913); Professor of 

Horticulture and Horticulturist of the Agricultural Experiment 
_ Station; 1921; 104 Jackson Avenue; 1545J. 
DRIVER, CHARLES WILLARD, Student Assistant in Chemistry; 

1923; 803 Hieh Street: 865R. 
DUSTMAN, ROBERT BARCLAY, Ph.D., (Chicago, 1924); Assistant 

Professor of Chemistry; 1924; 4 Price Street; 692W. 

EIESLAND, JOHN ARNDT, Ph.D., (Johns Hopkins. 1898); Professor 

of Mathematics; 1907; 316 Demain Avenue; 317R. 
EDEBURN, PAUL WALKER, B.S.Chem. Ener'g., (Grove City, 1924); 

Assistant in Che^istrv: 1924; 579 Price Street; 1196R. 
EDMONSON, HELEN LOUISE, A.B.. (W. V. U., 1924); Assistant 

Librarian: 1924; 360 Brockway: 165R. 
ELLIOTT, ALLEN McKINLEY, Student Assistant in Dairy Hus- 

bandrv; 1924: 792 Willey Street; 1492. 
EKE. PAUL AXEL, Ph.D.. (Wisconsin. 1923): Instructor in Farm 

Economics; 1925; 495 North High Street; 1705R. 
ELVIKEN. ANDREAS, Cand. Maj., (Christiana, 1921) instructor 

in History; 1925; 408 Forest Avenue; 175J. 

FARREN, JOHN WILLIAM, B.S.Chem. Eng'g., (Grove Citv, 1923); 

Assistant in Chemistry: 1924: 579 Price Street: 1196R. 
FARRIS, LESTER COLLINS, A.M.. (Columbia. 1916); Assistant 

Professor of English: 1924: 188 Soruce Street: 739R. 
FEAR. MARJA STEADMAN, A.B.. (Minnesota, 1913); Instructor in 

Public Sneakine: 1919: Spruce Street; 192M. 
FIELDS, MORRIS JOSEPH. M.B.A., (Harvard, 1923); Instructor in 

Economics: 1924: 708 Pearl Street, 1001 Yl. 
FORMAN, ALEXANDER HARDIE. E E., (W. V. U. 19^8): M.M.E, 

Ph.D., (Cornell. 1919, 1912); Professor of Electrical Engineering; 

1916: 1913: 233 Monris Street: 89SM. 
FORTNEY. ALTON REE, A.B.. (W. V. U., 1924); Assistant in Chem- 

istrv: 1924: 1922: 125 Prairie Avenue: 250J. 
FORTNEY, CAMDEN PAGE. B.S.C.E.. Chief Engineer, State Road 

Commission. Director of School of Good Roads. 
FRAME. NAT TERRY. A.B., (Colgate, 1899): Director of Agricul- 
tural Extension; 1914; Price Avenue; 804W. 
FRASER, THOMAS. E.M., (University of Illinois, 1921); Assistant 

Professor of Mining Engineering: 1924: 214 Dewev Street; 104W. 
FULMER, LEE: Mechanician in Phvsics Department': 1924. 
FULTON. MARTHA THEODA. A.M., (Columbia, 1923); Dean of 

Women: Instructor in English; Communitv Building:. 
FRIEND, WAYNE ZEARLEY, B.S.Chem. Ene'g.. (W. V. U., 1924); 

Assistant in Chemical Engineering; 692 High Street. 



378 West Virginia University 

GARBEIR, RALPH JOHN, Ph.D., (Minnesota, 1921); Professor of 

Agronomy and Associate Agronomist, Agricultural Experiment 

(Station; 1923; 1920; 309 iStewart Street; 14'34'M. 
GARLAND, CLARENCE EUGENE, Ph.D., (Johns Hopkins, 1923); 

Instructor in Chemistry; 174 First Street; 563M. 
GEORGE, ENOCH FRANKLIN, Ph.D., (Ohio State University, 

1920) ; Associate Professor of Physics; 1920; 751 College Avenue; 

311X1. 
GIDDINGS, NAHUM JAMES, Ph.D., (Wisconsin, 1918); Professor 

of Plant Pathology and Plant Pathologist, Experiment Station; 

1919; 1908; 36 Campus Drive; 667M. 
GIFFORD, WARREN, iB.S,Agr., (W. V. U., 1922); Instructor in 

Dairy Husbandry; 1923; 1922; 229 Grant Avenue; 254M. 
GILCHRIST, HUGH C, Captain Inf. U. S. A. (D.O.L.); Assistant 

Professor of Military .Science and Tactics; 1923; 661 Price 

(Street; 1152W. 
GILL, JAMiEiS HERBERT, B.M.E., M.E., (Minnesota, 1892, 1894); 

Professor of Machine Construction and Superintendent of Shops; 

1920; 22 Jones Avenue; 869R. 
GNAGEY, WILLIAM OLIVER, Instructor in Mechine Shop Prac- 
tice; 1920; Star City Road; 1498J. 
GODiDARD, HAZJEL MARY, B.S., (Wisconsin, 1924); Assistant in 

Home Economics; 1924; Community Building; 1692J. 
GORMAN, HOWARD J., Assistant Professor of Military Science and 

Tactics; 686 Grand 'Street; 481W. Died, April, 1925. 
GRAY, THOMAS DAVIS, B.S., (University of Maryland, 1915); 

Specialist in Horticulture,, Agricultural Extension Staff; 1920; 

on leave of absence. 
GREGORY, HENRY CLAY, Student Assistant in the Library; 1924; 

409 Penn Avenue. 
GRIFFIN, GRACE MARGARET, A.B., (Wisconsin, 1910); Director 

of Physical Education for Women; 1923; 5 Forest Avenue; 862 J. 
GRIMES, ARCHIBALD McGREGOR, A.M., (Yale, 1910); Instructor 

in Spanish; 19123; 748 College Avenue; 692J. 
GROW, GEORGE WALTER, B.S.M.E., (W. V. U., 1912); M. S., 

('Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1916) ; Assistant Profes- 
sor of Machine Design and Construction; 1917; 1912; Star City 

Road; 1045 J. 
GRUBER, HARRY NEIGHARD, B.,S.Agr., (W. V. U., 1923); Field 

Instructor, U. S. Veterans' Bureau. 
GRUMBINE, HARVEY CARSON, Ph.D., (Munich, 1900); Assistant 

Professor of English; 1919; 2040 University Avenue. Resigned, 

April, 1925. 
GRUMBEIN, JOHN BEHNY, M.M.E., (Cornell, 1914); Professor of 

Steam and Experimental Engineering; 1916; 1903; 204 McLane 

Avenue; 1885. 

HAGER, BUENA BRAND, Bookkeeper in the office of the Financial 
Secretary; 22 Bridge Street; 1156 J. 

HAISLIP, RICHARD CONNER, Student Assistant in Zoology; 1924; 
170 McLane Avenue; 1,252. 

HALL, ARTHUR ADAMS, M.S.M.E., (W. V. U., 1906) ; Professor of 
Electrical Engineering; 1923; 1916; 316 Forest Avenue; 175M. 

HALL, CLYDE HAMPTON, Student Assistant in the Library; 1923; 
University Avenue; 1530W. 

HALL, LILLIAN K., Secretary to the Dean of the College of Engi- 
neering; 1923; 128 Willey Street; 1218. 



Address List of Faculty 379 

HAMMOND, ELMER LIONEL, B.S.Pharm., (Michigan, 1921); In- 
structor in Pharmacv; 1921; 229 Wilson Avenue. 

HARDMAN, THOMAS PORTER, M.A., (Oxford, 1914); J. D., (Yale, 
1915); Professor of Law; 1919; 1913; 274 Spruce Street; 1522. 

HARDY, IRVIN, M.D., (College of Physicians and Surgeons, 1903); 
Clinical Professor of Minor Surgery; 1920; 1912; Walnut and 
Cobun Avenues; 629J. 

HARE, ALFRED JARRETT, A.M., (W. V. U., 1902); Professor of 
Latin and Secretary and Registrar of the University; 1898; 1889; 
571 Spruce Street; 870W. 

HARKINS, DUNCAN CLAIRE, A.M., (W. V. U., 1923); Instructor 
of Mathematics; 1923; 1920; 272 Prospect Street; 1277. 

HARRIS, THOMAS LUTHER, Ph.D., (Wisconsin, 1912); Professor 
Sociology; 1923; 1921; 9 Reed Street; 401R. 

HARTLEY, CHARLES HENRY, B.S.Agr., (W. V. U., 1917); Assist- 
ant Director in Charge of Supplementary Instruction, Agricul- 
tural Extension Staff; 1914; "The Flats"; 147R. 

HARSHBARGER, FRANCES, A.B., (Grinnell College, 1923); Assist- 
ant in Mathematics; 1923; Community Building; 1092J. 

HASKELL, JOSEPH HUNTER; 1922; Instructor in Mining (Exten- 
sion); Prince, West Virginia. 

HASTIE, FRANK B., Assistant Professor of Military Science and 
Tactics; First Lieutenant Engineer Corps, U. S. A.; 1924; Madi- 
gan Street; 737M. 

HAYES, FLORA RAY, A.B., (W. V. U., 1909); Instructor in Theory 
and History of Music; 1910; 480 High Street; 967J. 

HAYES, ISABEL R., Preceptress of the Woman's Hall; 1923; 
Woman's Hall; 516 J. 

HAYES, LESLIE DAVID, M.E., (Cornell, 1908); Professor of Ma- 
chine Design and Construction; 1918; 728 College Avenue; 831R. 

HAYMAN, JOSEPH LESTER, B.S., Ph.C, (Michigan, 1919); Assist- 
ant Professor of Pharmacy; 1921; 1919; on leave of absence. 

HEERMANS, MRS. FLORENCE ELLIOTT, Secretary to the Dean 
of the School of Medicine; 1920; 55 Carson Street; 437J. 

HELMICK, JOHN PIERPONT, Student Assistant in Philosophy; 
1924; 316 Cobun Avenue; 1330. 

HENDERSON, HARRY ORAM, M.S., (Pennsylvania State College, 

1916); Associate Professor of Dairy Husbandry; 1924; 1918; on leave 
of absence. 

HENDERSON, MAHLON LUCAS, Student Assistant in Physics; 
1923; 308 First Street; 1756. 

HERNDON, LYLE KERMIT, Student in Chemistry; 1923; University 
Avenue; 636J. 

HERNDON, NETTIE SOUTHWORTH, Student Assistant in History; 
1924; 308 First Street; 1756. 

HERTZOG, VIRGIL ROSS, Ph.G., (W. V. U., 1922); Instructor in 
Pharmacology; 493 Grand Street; 1164J. 

HILL, HARRY, A.B., (W. V. U., 1923); Assistant in Phvsics; 1921; 
468 Spruce Street; 141M. 

HILL, LAWRENCE BENJAMIN, Ph.D., (Columbia, 1921); Professor 
of Education; 1920; 1918; 301 Carson Street; 319M. 

HILL, HUBERT, M.S., (North Carolina, 1908); Associate Professor 
of Chemistry; 1920; 1910; 186 First Street; 474R. 

HINKEL, LYDIA IRENE, B.M., (Syracuse University, 1916): In- 
structor in Public School Music; 1921; 12 Hunt Street; 1109R. 

HITE, MRS. EVELYN, A.B., (W.V.U., 1898); Assistant Librarian; 
1922; 12 Hunt Street; 1109R. 



380 West Virginia University 

HODGE, WILLARD WELLINGTON, A.M., (Yale, 1914) ; Professor 

of Chemical Engineering; 1921; 293 Willey Street; 1667. 
HOLMES, MAURICE COFFIN, Student Assistant in Physics; 1923; 

89 Kingwood Street; 639R. 
HOPKINS, JAMES VINCENT, B.S.Agr., (University of Tennessee, 

1917); Dairy 'Specialist, Agricultural Extension Staff; 1923; 317 

Ford Street; 635M. 
HORSFALL, HAZEL, B.S., (Iowa State College, 1917); Assistant in 

4-H Club Work, Agricultural Eixtension Staff; 1920; Community 

Building. 
HOTT, GEORGE D., A.M., (W. V. U., 1924); Assistant in History; 

Spruce iStreet. 
HUMPHREYS, HARRY CHRISTOPHER, Ph.D., (Columbia, 1924); 

Associate Professor of Education (Extension); 1922; Charleston, 

W. Va. 
HUNKER, CARRIE BELLE, Secretary to the Dean of the College of 

Arts and Sciences; 1920; 407 Stewart Street; 1142. 

JACOBSON, CARL ALFRED, Ph.D., (Johns Hopkins, 1908); Profes- 
sor of Chemistry; 1920; 447 Cedar Street; 787M. 

JOHNSON, DAVID DALE, A.M., (W. V. U., 1903); Professor of 
English; 1920; 1902; 20 Campus Drive; 711M. 

JOHNSTON, John CHARLES, Secretary to the Dean of the College 
of Agriculture and Chief Clerk Agricultural Experiment Station; 
1914; Cox & 'Baker Apartments; 633R. 

JONE'S, CLEMENT ROSS, M.E.- (W. V. U., 1897); M.M.E, (Cornell, 
1900); Dean of the College of Engineering and Professor of 
Power Engineering; 1911; 1895; 317 Willey Street; 205J. 

JONES, WILLIAM J., Jr., B.S.Agr. Educ, (Pennsylvania State Col- 
lege, 1920); Director University Y. M. C. A.; 1921; 4 Wilson 
Avenue; 1072W. 

KAY, WILBUR JONES, A.M., (Washington and Jefferson College, 

1919); Professor of Public Speaking; 519 Park Street; 97W. 
KELTON, LUCY STONE, (Pratt Institute, ); Dietitian at 

Woman's Hall; 1923; 516J. 
KENDRICK, WILLIAM HENRY, A.B., (W. V. U, 1916); Assistant 

Director of State Boys' Clubs, Agricultural Extension Staff; 1919; 

1913; Weston, W. Va., R. 5; 61F2, Jane Lew. 
KERN, THOMAS F., First Lieutenant, Engineers, U. S. A. (D.O.L.) ; 

U. S. M. A., 1919); Assistant Professor of Military Science and 

Tactics; 1923; 283 Taylor Street; 264R. 
KESSEL, CHARLES ROYAL, M.D., (Jefferson Medical College, 

1921); University Physician; 1923; 1921; 85 South High Street; 

1295. 
KLINE, L. C, Superintendent of the Agronomy Farm; Easton Road; 

12F21. 
KING, BENJAMIN WALTER, A.M., (Harvard, 1917); Assistant 

Professor of Economics; 1917; 1911; Cheat Road; R. D. 3. 
KNIGHT, HENRY GRANGER, Ph.D., (Wiscor>in, 1917); Chemist 

and Director Agricultural Experiment Station; 1922; 263 McLane 

Avenue; 156R. 
KNOWLTON, HARRY EDWARD, Ph.D., (Cornell, 1920); Associate 

Professor of Horticulture and Associate Horticultist in the Ex- 
periment Station; 1919; 100 Jackson Avenue; 1545R. 
KNUTTI, ELEANOR EDDY, Assistant in the Library; 1923; 669 

Spruce Street; 484. 



Address List of Faculty 381 

KOEHLER, WALTER ALLOS, Ph.D., (Wisconsin, 1924); Assistant 
Professor of Chemical Engineering; 1924; 128 Simpson Street; 
1450R. 

LAWALL, CHARLES ELMER, E.M., M.,S., (Lehigh University, 

1914, 1921); Associate Professor of Mining Engineering; 1921; 

210 Dewey Street; 459J. 
LEITH, THEODRIC BRYANT, A.B., (Washington and Lee, 1916); 

Assistant Chemist, Agricultural Experiment Station; 1923; 1919; 

Evansdale. 
LEONIAN, LEON H., Ph.D., (Michigan, 1922); Assistant Professor 

of Plant Pathology; Plant Pathologist, Agricultural Experiment 

Station; 1922; Fairmont, W. Va.; 397R. 
LEPPERT, CHARLES L., Student Assistant in Zoology; 1924; 51 

Kingwood Street; 454J. 
LIVESAY, EDWARD ALEXANDER, A.M., (University of Missouri, 

1917); Professor of Animal Husbandry and Specialist in Animal 

Husbandry in the Agricultural Experiment Station; 1919; 321 

Demain Avenue; on leave of absence. 
LLOYD, TOM COX, B.S.E.E., (Carnegie Inst. Tech., 1923); Instruc- 
tor in Electrical Engineering; 1923; 321 Demain Avenue; 885 J. 
LYMAN, GEORGE RICHARD, Ph.D., (Harvard, 1906); Dean of the 

College of Agriculture; 1922; 730 College Avenue; 968M. 
LYTLE, CLARA, A.M., (Columbia, 1921); Instructor in English; 1919; 

230 Kirk Street; 1204. 

McGARRY, EDMUND DANIELS, M.B.A., (Harvard, 1921); Assist- 
ant Professor of Economics; 1921; 283 Willey Street. 

McGEE, SIDNEY LAMONT, A.M., (W. V. U., 1924); Instructor in 
Romance Languages; 1924; 1923; 126 Hough Street; 1178. 

McILVANE, THEODORE CLINTON, Ph.D., (Ohio State University, 
1924); Assistant Agronomist, Experiment Station; in charge of 
Agricultural Sub-Station; 1917; Maggie, W. Va. 

MACLIN, EDWARD SILVER, B.S. in Educ, (University of Tennes- 
see, 1916); Professor of Industrial Education; 1921; 202 Jackson 
Avenue; 39J. 

MADDEN, JULIAN PAUL, Instructor in Mining (Extension); 1922; 
Logan, W. Va. 

MADDEN, JOSEPH WARREN, B.A., (Illinois, 1922); J.D., (Chicago, 
1914); Dean of the College of Law; 1921; 307 Duquesne Avenue; 
445R. 

MAGEE, RAY HEWITT, Instructor in Mining (Extension); 1923; 
Mount Hope, W. Va. 

McKAY, EDITH, Storekeeper in Chemistry. 

MESTREZAT, WALTER ALEXANDER, Chief Musician, Cadet 
Corps, and Instructor in Band Music; 1901; 57 Bridge Street; 
1157J. 

MILLER, JOHN RICHARDSON, Ph.D., (Harvard, 1922); Assistant 
Professor of French and Spanish; 1922; 15 Hunt Street; 267. 

MICHEL, WERNER CASPER, P.D.S., (Berne, 1917); Assistant Pro- 
fessor of German; 1923; 2 Union Street; 862R. 

MITCHELL, HARRY CURTIS, Ph.D., (California, 1923); Assistant 
Professor in History; 1924; 1923; Clinton Avenue, 1361J. 

MICHAEL, KENNETH E., Student Assistant, Law Library; 1924; 
412 Forest Avenue. 

MITRANI, CHARLES, M.A., (California, 1917); Assistant Professor 
of Romance Languages; 1923; 1921; on leave of absence. 



382 West Virginia University 

MOLITOR, ROBERT LOUIS, M.A., (Haverford College, 1922); In- 
structor in English; 1923; 127 Jones Avenue. 

MOL'BY, FRED A., Ph.D., (Cornell, 1910); Professor of Physics; 
1921; 1920; 301 Price Avenue; 230R. 

MOORE, SUSAN MAXWELL, A.B., (W. V. U, 1909); Instructor in 
Piano; 1903; 174 First Street; 563M. 

MOORE, WALTER iS., BJS.E.M., (W. V. U, 1923); Instructor in Min- 
ing Extension; 1924; Widen, W. Va. 

MORELAND, MARY CATHRYN, B.S.Agr., (Missouri, 1916); Spe- 
cialist in Home Industries, Agricultural Extension Staff; 1921; 
571 Spruce Street. 

MORRIS, RUSSELL LOVE, C.E,, (W. V. U, 1898); Professor of 
Railway and Highway Engineering; 1903; 1895; 244 Grand 
'Street; 621J. 

MORRIS, SAMUEL, Ph.D., (Ohio State, 1921); Professor of Chem- 
istry; 1921; 1916; 126 Simpson Street; 891R. 

MORRIS, SAMUEL JOHN, M.D., (College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons, 1912); Professor of Anatomy; 1920; 1912; 83 Kingwood 
•Street; 9 60 J. 

MULLAN, GEORGE OSCAR, Student Assistant in Poultry Husband- 
ry; 1924; R. F. D. No. 1. 

MURPHY, CHARLES HICKMAN, iStudent Assistant in Agronomy; 
1^24; 792 Willey Street; 1492. 

NELSON, ROY EZEKIEL, BiS.C.E., (W. V. U., 1921); Instructor in 
Civil Engineering; 1921; 272 Broekway Avenue; 1563. 

NESBITT, NELL, A.M., (Chicago, 1912); Assistant Professor of 
Home Economics; 1924; Community Building; 1692 J. 

ODLAND, THODORE EDWARD, M.S., (Minnesota, 1920); Associate 
Professor of Agronomy; 1924; 1921; 792 College Avenue; 311Y1. 

OLNEY, ROY ADAMiS, B.S., (Cornell, 1915); Assistant Professor 
of Agricultural Education; 1923; 4 Mansion Avenue; 785 J. 

PARSONS, DICKSON WARD, M.S., (Wisconsin, 1918); Instructor 
in Agricultural Education; 1923; N. Willey Street. 

PEAIRS, LEONARD MARION, M.S., (Kansas Agricultural College, 
1907); Professor of Entomology; 104 Jones Avenue; 895R. 

PEARCY, JOHN FRANK, Ph.D., (Chicago, 1922); Associate Profes- 
sor of Physiology; Faculty Club; 12R. 

PETTIGREW, HELEN PURINTON, A.M., (W. V. U, 1921); Instruc- 
tor in English; 76 Grandview Avenue; 973R. 

PIPER, WILLIAM CHARLES, Student Assistant in the Library; 
1924; 100 McLane Avenue; 1252. 

POLLOCK, REBECCA LUELLA, A.M., (Columbia, 1916); Assistant 
Professor of Education; 1920; 1916; on leave of absence. 

PORTERFIELD, ALLEIN WILSON, Ph.D., (Columbia, 1910); Profes- 
sor of German; 72 Wilson Avenue; 550R. 

PORTERFIELD, HAROLD FRANCIS, Student Assistant in History; 
1924; 217 Grant Avenue. 

POUNDSTONE, JAMES STANLEY, Instructor in Mining Extension; 
1924; Williamson, W. Va. 

PRETTYMAN, HUGH WILLARD, BJS.Agr., (W. V. U, 1917) ; 
'Specialist in Horticulture; Agricultrual Extension Staff; Inwood, 
W. Va. 



Address List of Faculty 383 

PURINTON, DANIEL BOARDMAN, Ph.D., (University of Nashville, 
1892); LL.D., (Denison University, 1889); President and Pro- 
fessor of Philosophy, Emeritus; 1911; 1873; 76 Grandview Ave- 
nue; 973R. 

PURINTON, BERTHA BROWNING, A.M., (W. V. U., 1902); Assist- 
ant Registrar; 1923; 1901; 29 Lincoln Avenue; 4R. 

QUISENBERRY, KARL SPANGLER, B.S.Agr., (Kansas State Agri- 
cultural College, 1921); Instructor in Agronomy; 1921; on leave - 
of absence. 

RAPKING, AARON H., B.D., Specialist in Rural Organizations, Ag- 
ricultural Extension Start'; (In co-operation with West Virginia 
Wesleyan College); 1922; Buckhannon, W. Va. 

REED, ELIZABETH FROST, A.M., (Columbia, 1919); Instructor in 
English; 1919; 204 Grant Avenue; 717W. 

REED, PERLEY ISAAC, Ph.D., (Ohio State, 1916); Associate Pro- 
fessor of English; 1922; 1920; 204 Grant Avenue; 717W. 

REEDER, BENJAMIN GARNETT, A.B., LL.B., (W. V. U., 1921); 
Librarian of the Law Library; 1923; 69 Grandview Avenue; 734R. 

REESE, ALBERT MOORE, Ph.D., (Johns Hopkins, 1900); Professor 
of Zoology; 1907; 312 Park Street; 638W. 

REINER, MARY OLIVE, Student Assistant in the Library; 1924; 
Community Building. 

REYNOLDS, CLARENCE NEWTON, JR., Ph.D., (Harvard, 1919); 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics; 1921; 317 Brockway Ave- 
nue; 357XY. 

RHINE, JOSEPH BANKS, M.S., (Chicago, 1923); Instructor in 
Botany; 1924; 304 Maple Avenue; 681W. 

RICHMOND, JEAN ELNORA, M.A., (Iowa, 1924); Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Home Economics and Education; 1924; 506 N. High 
Street; 796R. 

ROACH, JOHN VIRGIL, Student Assistant in Economics; 1924; 234 
Prospect Street; 731R. 

ROBERTS, HAZEL VAN DYKE, A.B., (W. V. U., 1924); Assistant 
in Sociology; 1923; 420 High Street; 986J. 

ROBERTS, LAKIN FISKE, A.M., (Columbia, 1920); Associate Pro- 
fessor of Education; 1924; Price Street and Union Avenue; 1872J. 

ROCAWICH, MARY M., Student Assistant in the Library; 1924; 754 
College Avenue. 

RUFENER, LOUIS AUGUST, Ph.D., (Harvard University, 1915); 
Professor of Economics; 1922; 1920; 542 Spruce Street; 1152R. 

RUMSEY, WILLIAM EARL, B.S.Agr., (Cornell, 1891); State Ento- 
mologist; Experiment Station; 1893; 415 Park Street; 671R. 

RUNNER, CHARLES MICHAEL, Stationary Engineer; 213 King- 
wood Street; 696J. 

RUSSELL, WILLIAM H., Sergeant Infantry, U. S. A. (D.E.M.L.); 
Assistant to the Professor of Military Science and Tactics; 1923; 
400 Stewart Street; 569 J. 

SAPOSNEKOW, JACOB, M.A., (Columbia, 1917); Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Sociology; 1924; 495 High Street; 12R. 

SAYRE, GREEK, A.M., (W. V. U., 1920); Instructor in English; 
1921; 1918; 16 Overhill Street; 193W. 

SCHEFFEL, EARL REED, M.S., (Dennison University, 1908); Asso- 
ciate Professor of Geology; 1924; 1919; 495 High Street; 12R. 

SCHROEDER, CHARLES FREDERICK, A.B., (W. V. U., 1923); As- 
sistant in Zoology; 1923; 660 High Street; 648. 



384 West Virginia University 

SOOTT, ALFRED BEVERLY, Instructor in Drawing; 1922; 409 High 
'Street; 158-8. 

SCOTT, ALBERT BROWN, Student Assistant in 'Chemistry; 1923; 
203 Grand Street; 712 W. 

SOHULTZ, HENRY T., Staff Sergeant, U. S. A.; Assistant to the 
Professor of Military Science and Tactics; 1923; 285 Taylor 
Street. 

SEAMAN, RAYMER EGBERT, Instructor in Woodworking and 
Foundry Practice; 1912; 96 Gaston Avenue; 311M. 

SHAW, EDWARD LEE, B,S.Agr., (Ohio .State, 1902); Sheep Special- 
ist, Agricultural Experiment Station Staff; 1917; Ashley, Ohio. 

SHARPLEiSIS, CONSTANCE JANE, Student Assistant in Chemistry; 
1923; Woman's Hall; 9775. 

SHERWOOD, EVERETT CLIFTON, M.S., (Wisconsin, 1920); As- 
sistant Plant Pathologist, Agricultural Experiment Station, and 
Specialist in Plant Pathology, Agricultural Extension Staff; 
1923; 1920; 118 Willey Street; 221J. 

SHORTRIDGE, WILSON PORTER, Ph.D., (Minnesota, 1919); Pro- 
fessor of History; 1922; 118 Kingwood Street; 924W. 

SIMPSON, JOHN NATHAN, M.D., (Johns Hopkins, 1902); Dean of 
the School of Medicine and Professor of Physiology; 1912; 1902; 
63 Wilson Avenue; 244J. 

SLATEIR, SARA ELIZABETH, B.S., (Wisconsin, 1923); Instructor 
in Home Economics; Community Building; 1692J. 

SMITH, WILLIAM ADAMS, M.D., CM, (Queens University, Can- 
ada, 1905); Professor of Pathology and Bacteriology; 1923; 14 
Simpson Street; 1757 J. 

SMITH, EUGENE G., Second Lieutenant; Engineer Reserve Corps; 
Assistant to the Professor of Military Science and Tactics; 750 
Willey Street; 64J. 

SMITBEY, IRA WELLBORNE, M.S., (University of North Carolina, 
1921); Associate Professor of Chemistry; 1923; 1921; Wilkes- 
boro. N. C; on leave of absence. 

SNEE, GRACE MARTIN, Instructor in Piano and Pipe Organ; 1903; 
1898; 282 Fayette Street; 1147M. 

SNIDER, CLIFFORD RAYMOND, LL.B., (W. V. U., 1917); S.J.D., 
(Harvard, 1919); Professor of Law; 1922; 1921; 487 High Street; 

QQOT 

SPANGLER, ROBERT CLIFTON, A.M., (W. V. U., 1916); Associate 
Professor of Botany; 1923; 1912; 13 Naomi Street; 207J. 

SPIKER, CLAUDE CARL, Ph.D., (Chicago, 1922): Associate Pro- 
fessor of French and iSpanish; 1923; 1913; 418 Park Street; 9M. 

SPRAY, ROIBIB SPALDING, Ph.D., (Chicago, 1923); Associate Pro- 
fessor of Bacteriology; 1921; Fourth Street; 997R. 

STANSBURY, HARRY ADAMS, BJS., (W. Va. Wesleyan, 1915); 
Director of Athletics; 1917; 353 Wilson Avenue; 59. 

STARK, GLENN LEWIS, B:S.Agr., {Missouri, 1924); Assistant in 
Horticulture; 285 Richwood Avenue; 1361M. 

STATHERS, MADISON, Ph.D., ('Grenoble, 1905); Professor of 
Romance Languages; 1910; 1906; ;236 Grand Street; 594W. 

STEIN, GEORGE A., Student Assistant in Chemical Engineering; 
1924; 496 High Street; 591 J. 

STALNAKER, Elizabeth M., Ph.D., (Johns Hopkins, 1923); Associate 
Professor of Education; 1925; '408 Spruce Street; 213R. 

STEWART, JAMEiS SCOTT, M.S., (W. V. U., 1880); Professor of 
Mathematics; Emeritus; 1907; 1877; 146 Willey Street; 120R. 



Address List of Faculty 385 

STILLMAN, HERMAN DELOSS, Assistant in Woodworking; 1920; 
10 Falling Run Street; 596 J. 

STILLWELL, ERWIN COVERDALE, M.S., (Iowa State College, 
1923); Assistant Professor in Animal Husbandry; 1924; 1923; 
170 Spruce Street; 192J. 

STOCKDALE, CHARLES ELLSWORTH, B.S.Agr., (W. V. U., 1916); 
Agricultural Editor; 1916; Highland Park; 756J. 

STONE, HARRY EVERETT, A.M., (Columbia, 1922); Dean of Men; 
1922; 47 Maple Avenue. 

STRAUSBAUGH, PERRY DANIEL, Ph.D., (Chicago, 1920); Profes- 
sor of Botany; 1923; 381 Franklin Street; 259R. 

STRICKLER, LAURA, Secretary to the President; 1920; 247 Fife 
Avenue; 10 00 J. 

SUTTON, LUTHER FRANCIS, B.S.Agr., (Wisconsin, 1912); Assist- 
ant Horticulturist in the Experiment Station and Superintendent 
of the Reymann Memorial Experiment Farm; 1917; 1912; War- 
densville, W. Va. 

SWAN, WILLIAM ORR, Ph.D., (Virginia, 1922); Instructor in 
Chemistry; 1923; 336 Demain Avenue; 631J. 

TAYLOR, ALICE MILNER, B.S.H.E., (Ohio State, 1917); Instructor 
in Home Economics; 1920; 116 Linden Avenue; 4J. 

TAYLOR, LELAND HART, S.D., (Harvard, 1922); Assistant Profes- 
sor in Zoology; 1924; 1922; 116 Linden Avenue; 4J. 

TILTON, JOHN LITTLEFIELD, Ph.D., (Chicago, 1910); Professor 
of Geology; 1923; 1920; 212 Euclid Avenue; 969M. 

TITTERINGTON, RAYMOND JONES, Instructor in Mining (Exten- 
sion); 1923; Logan, W. Va. 

TROTTER, FRANK BUTLER, A.M., (Roanoke, 1895); LL.D., (W. 
Va. Wesleyan, 1914); President; 1916; 1907; 1549 University 
Avenue; 151. 

TROTTER, JAMES RUSSELL, A.M., (Harvard, 1896); LL.B., (W. 
V. U., 1902); Professor of Law; 1908; 504 Grand Street; 1198J. 

TROUT, GEORGE MALCOLM, B.S., (Iowa State College, 1923); 
Instructor in Dairying; 1923; 433 Beverly Avenue. 

TUCKWILLER, ROSS HOMAN, B.S.Agr., (W. V. U., 1916); Assist- 
ant in Beef Cattle Investigations, Experiment Station; 1916; 
Lewisburg, W. Va. 

TURNER, BIRD MARGARET, Ph.D., (Bryn Mawr, 1920); Assistant 
Professor of Mathematics; 1923; 408 Spruce Street; 213R. 

TURNER, ROBERT GRAHAM. M.S., (Iowa, 1922); Instructor in 
Chemistry; 1923; 258 First Street; 887W. 

VAN LIERE, EDWARD JERALD, M.D., (Harvard, 1920); Professor 

of Physiology; 1921; 304 Carson Street. 
VAN DEVEER, GEORGE JAY, B.S., (Rutgers, 1921); Assistant 

Poultry Specialist, Agricultural Extension Staff; 1921; 409 High 

Street; 1582W. 
VICKERS, ENOCH HOWARD, A.M., (Harvard, 1894); Professor of 

Economics and Sociology; 1910; 748 College Avenue; 692 J. 

WADE, BRYAN LLEWELLYN, B.S.Agr., (W. V. U., 1923); Assist- 
ant in Agronomy; 1923; 127 Jones Avenue; 754 J. 

WADDELL, LYNN, A.B., Graduate Assistant in English; 141 Lor- 
entz Avenue; 1942. 

WEAKLEY, CHARLES EDWARD, Jr., Assistant Chemist, Experi- 
ment Station; 1907; University Avenue; 1498W. 



386 West Virginia University 

WEIL JEANNETTA, Chief Clerk, Agricultural Extension Staff; 
1912; ; 590 Spruce Street; 830 J. 

WELTON, WRIGHT MONTGOMERY, Student Assistant in Chemis- 
try; 1923; 326 Beverly Avenue. 

WEST, RUFUS ASA, Instructor in Metal Working; 1913; 1892; 301 
First Street; 132 J. 

WEISTOVER, KYLE CHESTER, B.S., (New Hampshire, 1917); As- 
sistant Professor of Horticulture; 1920; on leave of absence. 

WHEELER, SHERMAN iSH AW, B.S., (Iowa, 1923); Instructor in 
Animal Husbandry; 1924; 309 Stewart Street; 1534M. 

WHITE, BENNETT SEXTON, B.S.M.E., (W. V. U., 1897); Assist- 
ant Professor of Drawing; 1921; 1919; 115 Qray Street; 873M. 

WHITE, JAMES H., Second Lieutenant Reserve Corps; U. S. A.; As- 
sistant to Professor of Military Science and Tactics; 2012 Uni- 
versity Avenue; 1190 J. 

WHITNER, ARTHUR R., Captain Infantry (D.O.L.) United States 
Army; Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics; 437 
Beverly Avenue; 1754R. 

WIGHTMAN, ERNEST THOMAS, B.S.Agr., (Pennsylvania State, 
1917); Assistant in Poultry Husbandry; 1924; 2048 University 
Avenue; 1331M. 

WILLIAMSON, ODAS, Assistant in -Library; 1924; 611 Allen 
Street; 983M. 

WILLIS, DENNIS MARTIN, A.B., LL.M., (W. V. U., 1905, 1908; 
Financial Secretary; 1915; 1895; 212 Park Street; 1078 J. 

WILSON, CHARLES VINYARD, M.S., (Iowa, 1924); Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Animal Husbandry; 1919; .120 Beverly Avenue; 1530 J. 

WINTER, JOHN E., Ph.D., (University of Michigan, 1917); Professor 
of Psychology; 1923; 1921; Grandview Avenue; 1126W. 

WOLFE, LUCY MALINDA, Student Assistant in Chemistry; Health 
iService Building; 475. 

WOUPERT, MILTON, Student Assistant in Zoology; 76i8 Front 
iStreet 

WOODBURN, DOROTHY, Student Assistant in Chemistry; 1924; 
300 Second Street; 688W. 

WOOFTER, CAREY, A.B., (W. V. U., 1924); Graduate Assistant in 
English; 1924; 220 Highland Avenue. 

YOKE, FRANK ROY, A.B., (W. V. U., 1903); Alumni Secretary; 

1922; 15 Wilson Avenue; 1446; office telephone 1326R. 
YOUNG, HAROLD GLENN, B.iS., (W. V. U., 1924); Instructor in 

Physiology; 1924; 6 Jones Avenue; 4J58M. 



List of Students 



STUDENTS ENROLLED IN THE COLLEGES. 



NOTE. — The following list includes the names of all students 
enrolled in the various colleges of the University, arranged in alpha- 
betical order. Following each student's name and address are given 
his class, course of study which he is pursuing, or the degree for 
which he is a candidate. The word freshman, sophomore, etc., fol- 
lowing the student's name, indicates his rank on the first day of No- 
vember, 1923. Regular students in the College of Law have the fol- 
lowing standing in the University: first-year students, sophomore; 
second-year students, junior; third-year students, senior; except those 
holding a bachelor's degree. Students whose names are marked with 
an asterisk (*) are ranked as. freshmen, but are conditioned in one or 
more preparatory subjects. Students marked as special students are 
classified in accordance with the regulations found on page 34 of this 
catalogue. 



Abruzzino, James Anthony 
Acker, Kenneth Eugene 
Adams, Anna Kathryn 
Adams, Mary Eugenia 
Addis, Carroll Weldin 
Addison, Carrie Maye 
Akins, Duane Edwin 
Alba, Robert Sanda 
Albright, Elinor Brown 
Albright, Mary Matilda 
Alderson, Charles Luther 
Alderson, Emma Frances 
Aldridge, Mary Ella 
Alleman, Gay Zearley 
Allen, Hubert A. 
Allen, Mary Rosamond 
Allen, Mildred Rebecca 
Allender, Franklin Leo 
Alley, Ralph Martin 

B.S., University of Idaho, 1922. 

Allinder, Joe Arthur 
Allman, John Isaac 

B.S.Agr., West Virginia 

Alvarez, Manuel 



Shinnston 

Wheeling 

Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

New Martinsville 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Mt. Hope 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Charleston 

Martinsburg 

Morgantown 

Huntington 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Belington 

Lewiston, Idaho 



Hights 
Jane Lew 

University, 1917. 

Caguas, P. 



R. 



Alvis, Raymond Woodman Newel 

Amidon, Lee Leonard Morgantown 

B.S.M.E., University of Minnesota, 1923. 

Amos, John Ellis Charleston 

Amos, Robert Ireland Pullman 

Anderson, Alton Johnson Webster Springs 

Anderson, James Donley Hundred 

Anderson, James Lee Littleton 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1923. 
LL.B., West Virginia University, 1924. 

Andrews, Dorothy Elizabeth Morgantown 



Fr., A.B. 
Sen., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Sen., A.B. 
Sen., B.S.E.E. 
Night Class 
Soph., E.E. 
Fr., A.B. 
*Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Soph., B.S.C.E. 
Sen., A.B. 

, B.S.M.E. 

A.B. 

, A.B. 

, B.S.E.E. 
Med. 



Soph. 
Sen., 
Soph., 
Soph., 
2d Yr, 



Soph., B.S.Ch.E. 
Grad., Agr. 

Sen., B.S.Agr. 
Soph., A.B. 
Grad., Eng'g. 

*Fr., A.B. 

Jun., B.S.Agr. 
Fr., B.S.Agr. 
Jun.. B.S.Agr. 
Grad., A. & S. 



Sen., B.S.H.E. 



388 



West Virginia University 



Andrews, Helen Frances 


Morgantown 


Sen., B.S.H.E. 


Angel, Philip 


Huntington 


Soph., A.B. 


Angotti, John Thomas 


Clarksburg 


Jun., B.S.C.E. 


Aponte, Ernesto Colon 


Caguas, P. R. 


Jun., B.S.M.E. 


Apple, Judas 


Kittanning, Pa. 


Fr., A.B. 


Applegate, Walter Macdonald Morgantown 


Fr„ A.B. 


Applegate, William Arthur 


Morgantown 


Jun., A.B. 


Areford, Henry Sheldon 


Carmichaels, Pa. 


1st Yr. Law 


Arnett, Frank Ellsworth 


White 'Sulphur SpgsGrad, A. & S. 


A.B., West Virginia Wesleyan College, 1911. 




Arnold, Emmett Wesley 


Sutton 


Soph., A.B. 


Aronsohn, Cecile 


New York, N. Y. 


Soph., A.B. 


Ash, Henry Lee 


Wilbur 


Jun., A.B. 


Ashburn, Robert Russell 


Reedsville 


Soph., A.B. 


Ashworth, Harold Bay 


Mounds ville 


Fr., A.B. 


Ashworth, Wease Lee 


Buckhannon 


Jun., A.B. 


Asinas, Emeterio Albienda 


Catubig, P. I. 


Jun., B.S.Agr. 


Asmus, Leonard Russell 


Wheeling 


Soph., A.B. 


Atlas, Mortimer David 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Soph., A.B. 


Atwood, Norman Calvin 


Morgantown 


Sen., B.S.Ch.E. 


Augustine, Carl James Ernest Parkersburg 


*Fr., B.S.C.E. 


Auldridge, Gail Pennell 


Hillsboro 


Fr., BjS.Agr. 


Austin, Marie Carolyn 


Philippi 


Sen., B.S.H.E. 


Avis, Hugh Clyde 


Lyburn 


Fr., A.B. 


Ayers, Herbert Dale 


Clarksburg 


Fr., A.B. 


Ayers, Thelnia 


Smithville 


Soph., B.S.H.E, 


Aylor, James LaVerne 


Huntington 


Fr., B.S.C.E. 


Azar, Charles Joseph 


New Martinsville 


Soph., iB.S.C.E, 


Balbyak, Joseph Baker 


Fairmont 


1st Yr. Med. 


Backus, Katharine Elizabeth 


Montgomery 


Jun., A.B. 


Baer, Robert Ely 


Morgantown 


Jun., A.B. 


Baildon, William Breck 


Huntington 


Jun., B.S.E.M. 


Bailey, Charles Robert 


Niagara Falls, N.Y.*Fr., A.B. 


Bailey, Ernest Brooks 


Craigsville 


Jun., A.B. 


Bailey, Hugh Estil 


Morgantown 


Sen., B..S.Ch.E. 


Bailey, Jessie Lee 


Morgantown 


Jun., A.B. 


Bailey, Lloyd Webster 


Morgantown 


Soph., A.B. 


Baird, Alice Mae 


Wilkinsiburg, Pa. 


Sen., A.B. 


Baird, Josiah Wallace, Jr. 


Elm Grove 


Sen., B.,S.Agr. 


Baird", Margery 


Elm Grove 


Soph, B.S.H.E. 


Baker, Ervin E. 


Clarksburg 


Soph, A.B. 


Baker, James Plummer 


Cheat Haven, Pa. 


Sen, A.B. 


Baker, Jonathan Jefferson 


Piedmont 


Fr, A.B. 


Baker, Lucy Ellen 


Hundred 


Grad, A. & S. 


A.B., West Virginia University, 


1919. 




Baker, Marian Louise 


Mannington 


Jun, B.S.H.E. 


Baker, Mary Bond 


Mo or en eld 


Soph, A.B. 


Baker, Royal Frank 


Gassaway 


Soph, A.B. 


Ball, Claude Russell 


Morgantown 


2d Yr. Med. 


Ball, Gordon Victor 


Ravenswood 


Sen, A.B. 


Ball, Marion Tabor 


Williamson 


*Fr, B.S.Agr. 


Ballam, Sydney Edward, Jr. 


Charleston 


Soph, A.B. 


Ballard, Wade Hampton 


Peterstown 


Soph, A.B. 


Ballangee, Graham Erskine 


Huntington 


Jun, A.B. 


Barclay, Bertram Donald 


Morgantown 


Grad, A. & S. 


B.S., College of Wooster, 1923. 






Bare, Henry Ziegler 


Morgantown 


Scph, A.B. 



List of Students 



389 



Barlow, Ralph Lawrence Beverly 

B.S.Agr., West Virginia University, 1918. 



Grad., A. & S. 



Barnes, Faye 


Wellsburg 


Soph., A.B. 


Barnett, Ada Marie 


Point Pleasant 


Jun., A.B. 


Barnhard, David 


New York, N. Y. 


Fr., A.B. 


Barnhiser, Von Bergen 


Morgantown 


2d Yr. Med. 


Barr, Dorothy Carney 


Morgantown 


Jun., A.B. 


Barrar, William George, Jr. 


Charleston 


Fr., B.S.M.E. 


Barrett, -Tame? Patrick 


Erie, Pa. 


2d Yr. Med 


Barrett, Mary Josephine 


Cameron 


Sen., A.B. 


Barrickman, Charles McClane 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Bartlett, Joseph Anthony 


Tarentum, Pa. 


Sen., A.B. 


Bartlett, En la Lee 


Perry Point, Md. 


Fr., A.B. 


Bartlett, Ima Rose 


Perry Point, Md. 


Fr., A.B. 


Bartlett, John Frank 


Gassaway 


Sen., A.B. 


Bassel, James Edwin 


Mt. Clare 


1st Yr. Law 


Batten, Beryl 


Morgantown 


Grad., A. & S. 


A.B., West Virginia University, 


1922. 




Batten, John Edward, Jr. 


Morgantown 


Soph., A.B. 


Batten, Ruth 


Morgantown 


Grad., A. & S. 


A.B., West Virginia University, 


1919. 




Bauer, Eleanor Elizabeth 


Moundsville 


Jun., A.B. 


Baughman, Gerald 


Philippi 


Jun., A.B. 


Baxter, Herbert Allen 


Sutton 


1st Yr. Law 


Bayer, Beverly Pitzer 


Berkeley Springs 


Fr., A.B. 


Bayles, Wesley Howard 


St. Marys 


Soph., A.B. 


Bayles, William David 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Beall, Chester Franklin 


Morgantown 


Jun., A.B. 


Beall, Clarence Frederick 


Morgantown 


Fr., B.S.M.E. 


Beall, Clarence Marshall 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Beall, Harley Jackson 


Mannington 


Fr., A.B. 


Beall, Louretta Mildred 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Bean, Robert Milton 


Landisburg 


Fr., B.S.E.E. 


Beard, Harry Elmer 


Huntington 


2d Yr. Med. 


Beard, Henry Harper 


Beard 


Jun., B.S.Agr. 


Beard, Matthew Lee, Jr. 


Hillsboro 


Fr., B.S.Agr. 


Beard, Orin Jennings 


Point Pleasant 


Grad., Agr. 


B.S.Agr., West Virginia Univers 


ity, 1924. 




Beardslee, Robert William 


Huntington 


Jun., B.S.E.E. 


Beavers, William A., Jr. 


Grafton 


*Fr., A.B. 


Beck, Calvin Henry 


Wheeling 


4th Yr. Phar. 


Beck, Martha Hogan 


Wheeling 


Sen., A.B. 


Beddow, Herbert Mather 


Mannington 


Grad., A. & S. 


A.B., West Virginia Wesleyan College, 1922. 




Bell, Eric Franklin 


Athens, Ohio 


Grad., A. & S. 


A.B., Ohio University, 1922. 






Bennett, Fred Hill 


Steubenville, Ohio 


Fr., B.S.C.E. 


Bennett, Gay 


Morgantown 


Sen., A.B. 


Bennett, Paul Clifford 


Morgantown 


Grad., Agr. 


B.S.Agr., West Virginia University, 1923. 




Benson, Chloris 


Philippi 


Jun., A.B. 


Berry, Eleanor 


Morgantown 


Sen., B.S.H.E. 


Berry, Evelyn Virginia Lee 


Morgantown 


Jun., A.B. 


Berry, Eugene Archibald 


Morgantown 


Jun., B.S.E.E. 


Berry, Frances 


Morgantown 


Fr., B.S.H.E. 


Berry, Margaret Vorella 


Morgantown 


Jun., A.B. 


Berry, Mary Keener 


Morgantown 


Jun., A.B. 


Betras, Peter Dohar 


Youngstown, Ohio 


Soph., A.B. 



390 



West Virginia University 



Bias, Marie Marguerite 
Bidding-ton, Margaret Smith 
Bienstock, Irving Horace 
Bierer, Barbara 
Bierer, Fred 
Bierer, 'Sarah 
Bigelow, Eleanor Maude 
Bigelow, Margaret Adele 
Binns, Carl Brooks 
Bisceglia, Joseph Louis 
Bishop, William Edmond 
Bis sett, Juanita Virginia 
Bitonty, Louis Fred 
Bivens, Spencer Lee 
Black, James Rutherford 
Blackburn, Blanche Caby 
Blackburn, George Blair 
Blackwood, Edwin Neale 
Blair, Marion Robinson 
Blake, Catharine Afton 
Blakely, George Thomas 
Bland, Charles Newton 
Bland, Robert Linn, Jr. 
Bland, Theodoric Edwards 
Blandford, Robert iSprigg 
Blasini, Emilio 
Blauberg, Walter Robert 
Bledsoe, Luther Edgar 
Blue, William Frederick 
Blumenberg, Hugo Frederick 
Bodkin, John Franklin 
B'Oggess, John Carney 
Boggs, William Carroll 
Boiarsky, Mose Edwin 
Bolman, Marion Isabel 
Bolton, Mary Louise 
Bonar, Alma Elfreida 
Bonar, Ethel Casto 

A.B., West Virginia University, 

Bonar, Martha 
Bond, Ian Hubert 

A.B., Salem College, 1923. 

Bone, Dorothy Helen 
Bone, George Wayne 
Bone, Lillian Margaret 
Boone, Lois Harriet 
Boone, Neva Frances 
Boone, Rrankin Roy 
Boone, Roy Elliott 
Borden, James Chapman 
Borror, Carson McClain 
Bosley, Frederick 
B-osworth, Brooks Brady 
Bosworth, Stanley )Steed 
Bottome, Virginia Marie 
Boundy, Kathryn Elizabeth 
Bourn, Warren Scudder 

A.B., West Virginia University, 



Williamson 


Fr., A.B. 


Frostburg, Md. 


*Fr., B.S.H.E. 


Newark, N. J. 


1st Yr. Med 


Morgantown 


Soph., A. B. 


Morgantown 


Soph., BjS.C.E. 


Morgantown 


Soph., A.B. 


Washington 


Fr., A.B. 


Washington 


Jun., A.B. 


Fairmont 


Soph., B.1S.E.E. 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 


2d Yr. Med. 


Terra Alta 


Soph. ,A.B. 


Benwood 


*Fr., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Meadow Bluff 


1st Yr. Med. 


Parnassus, Pa. 


Fr., A.B. 


Reedsville 


Soph., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Soph., B.S.C.E. 


Point Pleasant 


Sen., BjS.C.E. 


West Union 


Soph., BJS.Ch.E, 


Huntington 


Soph., A.B. 


Lyndhurst, N. J. 


Fr., A.B. 


Weston 


2d Yr. Med. 


Weston 


Soph., A.B. 


Weston 


Sen., B.S.Agr. 


Morgantown 


Jun., B.iS.M.E. 


Youco, P. R. 


*Fr., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Wesibster Springs 


Fr., A.B. 


Charleston 


3rd Yr. Law 


Wheeling 


Sen., A.B. 


Jane Lew 


Fr., B.'SjC.E. 


Shinnston 


Sen., B.S.Agr. 


Franklin 


Soph., A.B. 


Charleston 


Soph., A.B. 


Shinnston 


*Fr., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Jun., A.B. 


Moundsville 


Soph., B.S.H.E. 


Morgantown 


2d Yr. Med. 


1915. 




Belleville 


Sen., B.S.H.E. 


Roanoke 


2d Yr. Med. 


Moundsville 


Sen., B.S.H.E. 


Moundsville 


Soph., A.B. 


Moundsville 


Sen., A.B. 


Ronceverte 


Jun., BJS.H.E. 


Ronceverte 


Jun., A.B. 


Ronceverte 


Jun., A.B. 


Ronceverte 


Sen., A.B. 


Bluefield 


Fr., A.B. 


Clarksburg 


Soph., B./S.E.E. 


New Creek 


Fr., B.S.Agr. 


Benwood 


Sen., A.B. 


Elkins 


3rd Yr. Law 


Moundsville 


Jun., B.S.H.E. 


Cameron 


Fr., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Grad., A. & S. 


1923. 





List of Students 



391 



Bourn, William Dewey 
Bow, Theodore Clarence 
Bowers, Edna Kathryn 
Bowers, Karl Douglas 
Bowers, Martha Elizabeth 
Bowers, Virginia Venable 
Bowling, George Augustus 
Bowman, Berkeley Owen 

A.B., Blue Ridge College, 1924. 

Boyles, Aubrey Emmett 
Boyles, Melville Peter 

A.B., West Virginia University, 

Boyles, Murl Lawrence 
Brackett, Alice Steele 
Brackett, Dorothy Waddle 
Bradford, Frank Everett 
Bradford, William Werner 
Bradley, Joe Sholes 
Brafford, Thomas Brinton 
Bragg, William Alderson 
Braid, Edward Henry Barton 
Brandfield, Ira Illian 
Brannon, Eva Lee 



Tague 

Adamston 

Franklin 

Clarksburg 

Morgantown 

Carrollton, Mo. 

Lewisburg 

Union Bridge, Md. 

Philippi 
Philippi 

1914. 

Philippi 

Fairmont 

Fairmont 

Pennsboro 

Washington, D. C. 

Hinton 

Follansbee 

Ansted 

Charleston 

Beacon, N. Y. 

Glenville 



Bray, Albert Bertram Calfee, Jr.Ronceverte 



Brenaman, Robert Samuel 
Brennan, Bernice Russell 
Brewster, Walter Southgate 
Bright, Percy Wade 
Brill, Floyd McCauley 
Brill, Omar Hunter 
Briner, Clifford John 
Brochick, Anna 
Brock, Robert Luther 

A.B., West Virginia University, 

Brohard, Encil Ray 



Richmond, Va. 
Elm Grove 
Lewisburg 
Sutton 
Richwood 

Fayette City, Pa. 

Thomas 

Morgantown 

1920. 

Fairview 



B.S.Agr., West Virginia University, 1923. 



Brooks, Daniel Herbert 
Brosius, Henry Merry 
Brown, Arjay Lealand 
Brown, Arthur Alloysius 
Brown, Clifford Mayhew 
Brown, Daniel Morgan 
Brown, Elizabeth 
Brown, Ella Virginia 
Brown, Eloise 
Brown, Eugene Scott 
Brown, Garrett Fairfax 
Brown, Jeannette Dorsey 
Brown, John Andrews 
Brown, John Harold 
Brown, Margaret Patterson 
Brown, Mary Frances 
Brown, Mary Jane 
Brown, Ronald Paul 
Brown, Russell Guy 
Brown, William Byrne 
Brown, William James 
Browning, Claud Franklin 



Mullens 

Locust 

Point Marion, Pa. 

Dawson, Pa. 

Morgantown 

Uniontown, Pa. 

Morgantown 

Wheeling 

Morgantown 

Summersville 

Elkins 

Moundsville 

Morgantown 

Independence 

Kingwood 

Keyser 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Swandale 

New Cumberland 

Terra Alta 



Soph., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.E.E. 
*Fr., A.B. 
3rd Yr. Law 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., B.S.H.E. 
Jun., B.S.Agr. 
Grad., A. & S. 



Jun., A.B. 
Grad., A. & 



S. 



Jun., A.B. 
Sen., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Soph., B.S.E.M. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Soph., B.S.E.E. 
2d Yr. Med. 
Soph., B.S.H.E. 
Sen., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.C.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
1st Yr. Med. 
Fr., A.B. 
2d Yr. Law 

Grad., A. & S. 



E. 



Fr., A.B. 
Fr., B.S. E. 
Fr., A.B. 
1st Yr. Law 
Fr., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
A.B. 
B.S.H.E. 
A.B. 
A.B. 

A.B. 
A.B. 
Agr. 
A.B. 
A.B. 
A.B. 



Sen. 

Jun. 

Fr., 

Fr., 

Jun. 

Fr., 

Voc. 

Sen., 

*Fr., 

Soph 



Fr., B.S.H.E. 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.E.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
Sen., A.B. 
Soph., B.S.C.E. 



392 



West Virginia University 



Browning, William Lloyd, Jr. 
Brozie, Andrew James 
Bruder, Wood Harlan 
Bruffey, Adam Glenn 
Bruffey, James Barnard 
Brust, Victor Wilhelm 
Buck, Walter Edwin 
Buckey, William Emmett 

A.B., West Virginia University, 

Buell, Clifford Delmont 
Buitrago, Eugenio, Jr. 
Bull, Mary Esther 
Bunten, Theodore Watson 
Bunten, Thomas Ellsworth 
Burehinal, Robert Ira 
Burdett, John Kunst 
Burley, Lindsey Lloyd 
Burth, Henry Herman 
Burton, Beachley Ernest 
Burton, Rae^rey A. 
Bush, Kline Edgar 
Buskirk, Mildred Barbee 
Busisey, Charles Chester 
Butts, Henry Pemberton 
Butts, Virginia Frye 
Buvinger, Ralph Sherman 
Byer, Harry Bruner 

Cadden, Anthony Vandril 
Cain, Harry Wilson 
Calhoun, Harlan M. 
Oallaghan, Eulai B. 
Oallaghan, Thomas Tess 
Callaham, Paul Ronald 
Callaway, Elbert Mayo 
Calvert, Carmen Corabelle 
Calvert, Elsmere Carlton 
Calvert, Francis Augustus E. 
Calvert, Margaret Elizabeth 
Camp'bell, Anna Mae 
Campbell, Beryl Harold 
Campbell, Eleanor Jane 
Campbell, Roy Edward 
Campbell, William Robert 
Cantrall, Archibald Martin 

AJB., West Virginia University, 

Cantrall, Charlotte Wood 
Caplan, Howard 
Garden, Howard Rader 
Carder, Bryan James 

A.B., Salem College, 1924. 

Carle, David 

Carman, Gertrude Gazelle 
Oarnes, Wilbur Clement 
Games, William Glenn 
Carney, Chesney Michael 



Uniontown, Pa. 
Midland, Pa. 
Houston, Texas 
Hillsboro 
Pullman 
Morgantown 
Sistersville 
Fairmont 

1921. 

Masontown, Pa. 

Guayama, P. R. 

Sistersville 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Grafton 

Bellton 

Jamaica, N. Y. 

Elizabeth 

Huntington 

Morgantown 

Huntington 

Clarksburg 

Charleston 

Harper's Ferry 

Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

Clarksburg 



A.B., West Virginia University, 1924. 



Keyser 

Belington 

Franklin 

Craigsville 

Craigsville 

Hinton 

Huntington 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Chelyan 

Kesler's Cross 

Morgantown 

Belington 

Charleston 

Beckley 

Morgantown 

1922. 

Morgantown 
Clarksburg 
Huntington 
Long Run 

Wheeling 

Hinton 

Clendenin 

Clendenin 

Wheeling 



Jvn., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.C.E. 
Sen., A.B. 
Fr., B.iS.E.E. 
Jun., A.B. 
Grad., A. & S. 

Fr., A.B. 
Sen., B.S.M.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.Ch.E. 
Jun., B.S.Ch.E. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
*Fr., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.E.E. 
Fr., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
3d Yr. Law 
Fr. ,A.B. 
*Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 



Soph., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.E.E. 
2d Yr. Law 
Sen., A.B. 
1st Yr. Med. 
Sen., B.S.E.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
Sen., A.B. 
Sen., B.S.M.E. 
Fr., BjS.M.E. 
Fr., BjS.H.E. 
Lanes Fr., A.B. 

Soph., B.S.E.M 
Soph., B.S.H.E. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
3d Yr. Law 

Soph., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
1st Yr. Med. 

Fr., B.S.E.E. 
Fr., B.S.H.E. 
2d Yr. Law 
Fr., A.B. 
2d Yr. Law 



List of Students 



393 



Carpenter, Lewis Van Mor^ntown 

B.S.C.E., West Virginia University, 1918. 

Carrico, Dorothy Terra Alta 

Carroll, Carlo Bowlby Morp-antown 

B.S.Agr., West Virginia University, 1924. 



Carroll, John Louis 
Carroll, Virginia 
Carskadon, Fred Leps 
Carte, Estol Taylor 
Carte, Robert Lester 
Carter, Allen Eldridge 
Carter, Margaret Lee 
Carter, Robert Moore 
Carvey, Charles Leps 
Casebolt, Marion Ferguson 
Cassell, Clyde Jacob 
Casto, Cameron Bland 
Casto, Ronald Herman 
Gather. Carl Henry 

B.S.M.E., West Virginia University, 1916 
M.S., University of Illinois, 1922 



Wheeling 

Wheeling 

Headsville 

Clendenin 

Connellsville, Pa. 

Catawba 

Elm Grove 

Mt. Hope 

No. Braddock, Pa. 

Williamson 

Cass 

French Creek 

Kenna 

Morp-antown 



Cavendisn, Fred Clinton 
Cavitt, James Rees 
Cawley, Helen Loretta 
Chabourel, Alfred 
Chadduck, Harry Weibster, Jr. 
Chafin, James Arthur 
Chafin, William Lee 
Cham'bers, Franklin Mart 
Chambers, Merritt Edward 
Chambers, Pearl Adena 
Chambers, Roy Chester 
Chambers, Vannetta 
Chancellor, Norvell 
Chandler, Flavius Carl 
Channel!, Eleanor Louise 
Chaplin, Virginia Elizabeth 
Chapman, Berlin Basil 
Chapman, John Frederick 
Charlton, Annabel 
Charnock, John Nicholls 
Cheesman, Raymond John 
Chenoweth, Perthas Calvert 
Chesrown, Donald L. 
Christian, Lea Elza 
Church, Ernest Elliott 

A.B., Waynesburg College, 1918. 

Clark, Asa 

A.B., West Virginia University, 

Clark, Dewev Edward 
Clark, Ella Henry 
Clark, Francis Alden 
Clark, Helen 
Clark, Merrill Curtis 
Clark, Price Everett 
Clark, Robert Deward 
Clark, Zelith Alfonzo 
Clarke, Alice Williamson 



Montgomery 

Keyser 

Sistersville 

Morgantown 

Grafton 

Logan 

Logan 

Ravenswood 

Cameron 

Moundsville 

Moundsville 

Martinsiburg 

Parkersburg 

Frame 

Elkins 

Morgantown 

Webster Springs 

Davis 

Mannington 

Charleston 

Morgantown 

Wendel 

Morgantown 

Huntington 

Martinsburg 

Morgantown 

1924. 

Hemlock 

Morgantown 

Charleston 

Morgantown 

Princeton 

Hemlock 

Surveyor 

Morgantown 

Graham Station 



Grad., Eng'g. 

Fr., B.S.H.E. 
Grad., Agr. 

Soph., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Jum, B.S.Ch.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
*Fr., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Sen., B.S.M.E. 
Fr., A.B. 
*Fr., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
2d Yr. Law 
Grad., Eng'g. 

Sen., A.B. 
Sonh., A.B. 
Jun., B.S.H.E. 
Sen., B.S.E.E. 
Fr., B.S.Ch.E. 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.C.E. 
So->h., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
1st Yr. Phar. 
Sen., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.Agr. 
Jun., A.B. 
Soph., B.S.H.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
Sen., A.B. 
Jun., B.S.Agr. 
Fr., A.B. 
3d Yr. Law 
Fr., B.S.M.E. 
2d Yr. Med. 
Special Eng'g. 
1st Yr. Med. 
Grad., A. & S. 

Grad., A. & S. 

Jun., B.E.Agr. 
Jun., A.B. 
1st Yr. Med. 
Night Class 
Fr., B.S E.E. 
Sen , B.S.Agr. 
2d Yr. Med. 
Sen., A.B. 
Sen., A.B. 



394 



West Virginia University 



Clift, Irene Ellen 
Clovis, Edith 
Clovis, Eunice Madge 
Clovis, Hayward Edgar 
Clulo, Genevieve Bernice 
Cochran, John Kermit 
Cochran, William Hazen 
Cochrane, Thomas Joseph 

B.S., New Hampshire University, 

Cody, Mildred Frances 
Coffman, Harold Goodwin 
Cofresi, Emilio 
Cohen, Hyman Charles 
Cohen, Robert 
Cohen, -Sarah Charlotte 
Cole, Catherine Wilson 
Cole, George Milton 
Cole, George Lough 
Cole, Richard Lewis 
Cole, Virginia Garrison 
Colebank, Harry George 
Coleman, Charles Bradford, Jr. 
Coleman, John Dawson 
Coleman, Mary Imogen 
Coleman, Theodore 
Collins, Ross Harold 
Collison, Rodwell T. 
Colvin, Robert Gordon 
Comunale, Anthony Roderick 

B.S., Rutgers College, 1923. 

Conaway, Harrison 
Conaway, Leila Grace 
Conaway, Mary Josephine 
Condry, Raphael Joseph 
Coniff, John Waterhouse 
Conley, Gertrude Hilma 
Conley, James iStalnaker 
Conn, Olive Harshman 
Conn, Robert Garland 
Connolly, Velma Hickman 
Conti, Anthony 
Conway, Charles Hughston 
Conway, Delibert Henry 
Conway, Everett Wilfred 
Cook, Kermit Alderson 
Cooke, Harry Wil'bert 
Cooke, Joseph Malcolm 
Cooper, Adolph 
Cooper, Elizabeth Harriett 
Cooper, Howard Gilbert 
Cooper, Theodore 
Copley, William Albert 
Corbin, Frank Pickering, Jr. 
Core, Arthur Lynn 
Core, Earl Lemley 
Cormany, Ingaba 
Cormany, William John Benj. 



Chelyan 


Jun., A.B. 


St. Marys 


Jun., A.B. 


St. Marys 


Night Class 


Pennsboro 


Sen., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


St. Marys 


Sen., B.S.E.M. 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Morgantown 

1919. 


Grad., Eng'g. 


Elkins 


Sen., A.B. 


Mannington 


Sen., B,S.C.E. 


Mayaguez, P. R. 


Fr., A.B. 


Charleston 


Soph., A.B. 


Huntington 


Fr., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Sen., A.B. 


Jersey City, N. J. 


Fr., A.B. 


Fairmont 


Fr., B.,S.E.E. 


Shinnston 


Jun., B.S.E.E. 


Morgantown 


Sen., A.B. 


Parsons 


Sen., B.S.C.E. 


Pratt 


Fr., A.B. 


Clarksburg 


Sen., B.,S.Ch.E, 


Beckley 


Fr., A.B. 


Huntington 


1st Yr. Med. 


Sistersville 


2d Yr. Phar. 


Martinsiburg 


Soph., A.B. 


Owings 


Soph., B.,S.E.E, 


Iselin, N. J. 


1st Yr. Med. 


Fairmont 


Jun., A.B. 


Manninlgton 


Fr., A.B. 


Fairmont 


Soph., A.B. 


Clarksburg 


2d Yr. Med. 


Wheeling 


Soph., A.B. 


Gassaway 


Fr., A.B. 


Charleston 


Jun., A.B. 


Romney 


Fr., B.S.H.E. 


Morgantown 


Soph., A.B. 


Parkers burg 


2d Yr. Phar. 


Youngstown, Ohio 


Soph., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Soph., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Soph., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Fr., B.S.E.E. 


Toney Fork 


*Fr., A.B. 


Pineville 


Soph., A.B. 


Charleston 


Fr., BjS.C.E. 


Cass 


Fr., A.B. 


New Cumberland 


Jun., A.B. 


Williamstown 


Fr., A.B. 


Cass 


Jun., A.B. 


Logan 


Fr., B.S.M.E. 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Core 


Sen., B,S.Agr. 


Core 


Jun., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Soph., A.B. 


Belington 


Sen., A.B. 



List of Students 



395 



Cornell, Edith Jane 
Cornell, Ferris Dewey 

M.S., Cornell University, 1924. 

Cornell, Glenn Hurston 
Cornell, Nelle May 
Corrothers, Mary Rebecca 
Coscia, Enrico Giordano Carl 
Cosgrove, William Alexander 
Cottrell, Jack Tipton 

A.B., Center College, 1922. 

Cottrell, John Quincy, Jr. 
Coughlin, Helen Mary 
Cowden, William Kennon, Jr. 
Cowl, Margaret Clator 
Cox, Byrl Benton 
Cox, Jane Elizabeth 
Cox, Mary Pauline 
Cox, Osa Linn-ell 
Cox, Ralph Leo 
Craig, Charles Paul 
Craig. Frank Waldo 



Morgantown 
Morgantown 

Morgantown 
Morgantown 
Little Falls 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Vanderbilt, Pa. 
Prestonsburg, Ky. 

Charleston 

Morgantown 

Huntington 

St. Albans 

Pullman 

Wheeling 

Shinnston 

Nutter Fort 

New Salem, Pa. 

Clarksburg 

Morgantown 



B.S.Agr., West Virginia University, 1923. 



Craig, James Bruce 
Craig, Joseph Elson 
Crane, Lillian 
Crane, Maxine Elliott 
Craver, Daniel Barth 
Crawford, Benjamin Hargis 
Crawford, Rosemary 
Crawford, Thomas Stephen 
Crawford, William 
Cricchi, James 
Crickenberger, Du Bois 
Criner, Francis Edward 
Crooks, Ethel Jane 
Crow, Carl Duwayne 
Crow, George Burton 
Crumpler, Benton Eugene 
Crush, Robert Glenn 
Cunningham, Carleton Sewell 
Cunningham, Donnie 
Cunningham, George Norman 
Cunningham, James Clayton 
Cunningham, Jessie 
Cunningham, Virgil Wayne 
Curn.es, Robert Leffridge 
Curran, James Edward 
Currence, Theodore Mason 
Currence, Trov Mansell 



Clarksburg 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Mt. Hope 

Morgantown 

Point Marion, Pa. 

Pursglove 

Pursglove 

Republic, Pa. 

Grafton 

Point Marion, Pa. 

Clarion, Pa. 

Moundsville 

Ripley 

Williamson 

Fairmont 

Martinsburg 

Letart 

Wheeling 

Charleston 

Wheeling 

Hepzibah 

St. Albans 

New Martinsville 

Ellamore 

Ellamore 



B.S.Agr., West Virginia University, 1923. 

Current, Wilbur Russell Thornton 

Curry, Berval St. Albans 

Curry, Raymond Haile Hamlin 

Curry, Raymond Martin Madison 

Curtis, Don Milton St. Marys 

Cushing, John Willard, Jr. Sistersville 



Soph., A.B. 
Grad., Agr. 

Soph., B,S.E.E. 
Soph., B.S.H.E. 
Fr., A.B. 
2d Yr. Med. 
Soph., B.S.M.E. 
1st Yr. Med. 

Fr., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Sen., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Sen., A.B. 
Grad., Agr. 

Fr., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.M.E. 
Jun., B.S.H.E. 
Sen., A.B. 
Soph., B.S.C.E. 
Soph., B.S.E.M. 
Fr., A.B. 
Sen., B.S. in E. 
Soph., B.S.E.M. 

B.S.E.E. 

B.S.E.E. 

,B. 

B.S.H.E. 
Fr., B.S.Agr. 
3d Yr. Law 
Soph., B.S.C.E. 
Jun., B.S.E.E. 
Jun., B.S.C.E. 
Voc. Agr. 
2d Yr. Med. 
Jun., B.S.M.E. 

A.B. 

A.B. 

B.S.Ch.E. 

A.B. 
B.S.C.E. 



Soph., 
Soph., 
Fr., A. 
Soph. 



Soph. 

Soph. 

Soph. 

Soph. 

Fr., 

Grad., Agr. 



Edu. 



Sen., Ind. 
Fr., A.B. 
2d Yr. Med. 
Fr., A.B. 
1st Yr. Phar 
Fr., B.S.E.M. 



396 



West Virginia University 



D'Agostino, Georgiana Garcia Morgantown Sen., B^S.H.E. 



Dailey, Earl Leora 

A.B., West Virginia University 

Dailey, Lorenz Adair 
D'Aiuto, Daniel Thomas 
D'Aiuto, Lida Maria 
Daly, Paul Mclntyre 



Grad. A. & S. 



B.S.Agr., McGill University, 



Morgantown 

1924. 

Terra Alta Jun, A.B. 

Martinsburg 1st Yr. Law 

Martins'burg Soph., B.S.H.E. 

Ottawa Grad., Agr, 

Central Experiment Farm, Ottawa 

1921. 



Damron, Bertie Lee Williamson 

Daniels, Willard Floyd Elkins ' 

Darkey, Nina Agnes Parsons 

Daughenbaugh, Paul Jones Thomas 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1924. 

Daugherty, Sarah Madeline Elkins 

Da via, James Monongah 

Davidson, John Forrest Russellville, Ky. 

Davies, Thomas Charlton Ironton, Ohio 

Davis, Carl Lewis Charleston 

Davis, Clarence Edwin Huntington 

Davis, Clella Irene Weston 

Davis, Floyd Ebey White Hall, 111. 

A.B., Illinois College. 

Davis, Fred Luther Parkersburg 

Davis, Hannibal Albert Morgantown 



A.B., West Virginia University, 1923. 



Davis, Hubert Beryl 
Davis, Jessie Maude 
Davis, John Alexander 
Davis, John Walker 
Davis, Lowell Smith 
Davis, Maude Ellen 
Davis, Mildred Burton 
Davis, Paul Erwin 
Davis, iSusan Mary 
Davis, Wayne McVeigh 
Davis, Willis Feather 
Davison, Catherine Elenore 
Deahl, Henry George 
Dealhl, Kenneth 
Deahl, Marion Henry 
Deahl, Martha Kline 
Deal, Loydie 
Dean, Alice Elsworth 
Deffenbaugh, Ruth 
Defillo, Juan Basora 
Deitz, Reginald Leonard 
Delaney, Clark Farrel 
Demain, Catherine Hope 



Weston 

Elizabeth 

Parkersburg 

Terra Alta 

Morgantown 

Flatwoods 

Mullens 

Fairmont 

Glenville 

Thomas 

Terra Alta 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Newburg 

Davis 

Morgantown 

Elkins 

Elk Garden 

Washington, D. C. 

Mayguez, P. R. 

Sun 

Pine Grove 

Morgantown 

Charles Town 



Denny, George Hutcheson 

A.B., Hampden-Sidney College, 1918. 

DeVaughn, Katheryn Irene Morgantown 

DeVaughn, Margaret Wetzel Morgantown 

de Verbre, Elmer Witt Ronceverte 

Deveny, John Arlington Fairmont 

Deveny, Thomas Augustus, Jr. Fairmont 

Devison, Austin Wendell Grant Town 



3d Yr. Law 
1st Yr. Med. 
*Fr., A.B. 
1st Yr. Law 

Sen., i\.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Soph., B.S.C.E. 
Soph., B.S.H.E. 
Grad., A. & S. 

Jun., A.B. 
Grad., A. & S. 

Sen., B.S.Agr. 
Fr., B.S.H.E. 
Fr.. A.B. 
Soph, B.S.M.E. 
Soph., B.S.E.E. 
Sen., BjS.H.E. 
*Fr., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.E.E. 
Sen., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.M.E. 
Soph, B.S.E.E. 
Fr, B.S.H.E. 
Soph, A.B. 
Sen, B.S.C.E. 
Soph, B.S.Agr. 
Sen, A.B. 
Jun, A.B. 
Soph, A.B. 
Soph, A.B. 
Fr, A.B. 
Fr, BjS.E.E. 
Fr, A.B. 
Sen, A.B. 
Grad, A. & S. 

Soph, A.B. 
Sen, A.B. 
Sen, B.S.E.E. 
Fr, A.B. 
1st Yr. Law 
Fr, B.S.M.E. 



List of Students 



397 



Donley, 
Donley, 

A.B., 

Donley, 



Dew, Mary Jane 

A.B., Salem College, 1921. 

Diaz, Manuel Sariego 
Dilcher, Charles Fischer 
Dillon, Clinton Seckman 
Dillon, Henry Estel, Jr. 
Dittman, Martha Blanche 
Dobbins, Paul Fleming 
Dobbs, Kathryn Fette 
Dodrill, Forest Dewey 
Dolan, Catherine Antoinette 
Dolley, Eunice Pennington 
Dollman, Virgil Clare 
Donaldson, Dorothy Marietta 
Donkin, Mabel Virginia 
David Edward 
Robert Tucker 

West Virginia University, 

Samuel Jackson 
Donovan, "Charles Richard 
Dorr, Birdie Louise 
Dorr, Charles Philip 
Dorr, Hazel Ruth 
Dorsey, Arch 
Dorsey, Carleton Paul 
Dorsey, Warner Arnett 
Dorsey, Willie Orval 
Dotson, Nola 
Doty, Clarence LeRoy 
Douglas, Forrest Dayton 

A.B., West Virginia Wesleyan 

Douglas, Gerald Randolph 
Douglass, Edna 
Douglass, Edwin Holmes 
Dowling, Goethe Evelyn 
Dransfield, Arbie Glenn 
Driehorst, William Albert 
Driver, Charles Willard 
Duchin, Maurice Samuel 
Duff, Wirt 

Duliere, Ruby Blanche 
Duncan, George Andrew 
Duncan, Harry Andrew, Jr. 
Duncan, Harry Leon 

A.B., Marietta College, 1923. 

Dunlap, Claude 

Dunn, Amos 

Dunn, Jasper McDowell 

B.S.Agr.. West Virginia Univer 

DuPuy, Elbert Newton 
Duval, Thomas Harding 
Dwinnell, Bertha Marie 
Dye, Arthur Pingree 

B.S.Agr., West Virginia Univer 



Eagan, Hugh Edward 
Eakin, Paul Joseph 
Eakle, Earl Lough 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1923 



Salem 


Grad., A. & S. 


Clarksburg 


Fr., B.S.E.E. 


Charleston 


Sen., A.B. 


St. Marys 


Soph., A.B. 


Smithers 


2d Yr. Law 


Munhall, Pa. 


Sen., B.S.H.E. 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Wheeling 


Soph., A.B. 


Webster Springs 


Sen., A.B. 


Clarksburg 


Fr., B.S.H.E. 


Gastonia, N. C. 


Sen., A.B. 


Charleston 


Fr., A.B. 


New Martinsville 


Jun., A.B. 


Bluefield 


*Fr., B.S.H.E. 


Morgantown 


Jun., B.S.C.E. 


Morgantown 


2d Yr. Law 


1924. 




Shepherdstown 


Soph., B.S.E.E. 


Huntington 


Jun., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Morgantown 


2d Yr. Law 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Moundsville 


1st Yr. Law 


Kingwood 


Soph., B.S.Agr. 


Mt. Nebo 


*Fr., B.S.Agr. 


Mt. Nebo 


Jun., A.B. 


Richwood 


Fr., A.B. 


Charleston 


Fr., A.B. 


Buckhannon 


3d Yr. Law 


College, 1921. 




Diamond 


Fr., A.B. 


St. Marys 


Jun., A.B. 


Petroleum 


Fr., A.B. 


Piedmont 


Sen., A.B. 


Gap Mills 


Soph., B.S.Agr. 


Wheeling 


Fr., A.B. 


Huntington 


Sen., A.B. 


Cambridge, Mass. 


Jun., A.B. 


Charleston 


1st Yr. Med . 


Point Marion, Pa. 


*Fr., A.B. 


Clarksburg 


1st Yr. Med. 


Oak Hill 


Fr., A.B. 


Moundsville 


1st Yr. Med. 


South Charleston 


*Fr., A.B. 


Richwood 


Soph., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Grad., Agr. 


•sity. 1922. 




Beckley 


Soph., A.B. 


Wellsburg 


Soph., A.B. 


Elm Grove 


Soph., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Grad., Agr. 


•sity, 1923. 




Huntington 


Fr., A.B. 


Fairmont 


Fr., A.B. 


Clay 


3d Yr. Law 



398 



West Virginia University 



Eakle, Hazel Linhart 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Earnest, William Haymaker 


Export, Pa. 


1st Yr. Med. 


Easley, Jess *Woodrum, Jr. 


Dan 


Soph., A.B. 


Eaton, Alma Grace 


Morgantown 


Grad., A. & S. 


A.B., Blackburn College, 1916. 






Eaton, Alonzo Guy 


Fairchance, Pa. 


Grad., A. & S. 


B.S., Pennsylvania State College, 


1924. 




E'bbert, Emma 


Wheeling 


Soph., A.B. 


Ebeling, Margaret Virginia 


Wheeling 


Soph., A.B. 


Edeburn, Paul Walker 


West Middlesex, 


Pa.Grad., A. & S. 


B.S., Grove City College, 1919. 






Edwards, Laurens Frank 


Charleston 


Jun., B.S.M.E. 


Edwards, Violet 


Parkersburg 


Soph., BjS.H.E. 


Edwards, Warren Pratt 


Charleston 


Fr., A.B. 


Eichenmiller, Elizabeth K. 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 


Fr., A.B. 


Ekberg, Gustav Anthony 


Morgantown 


Sen., A.B. 


Elliott, Allen McKinley 


Elm Grove 


Sen., B.,S.Agr. 


Ellyson, Mae 


Co wen 


*Fr., B,S.H.E. 


Ely, Veda Mae 


Mannington 


Jun., A.B. 


Emerick, Burley Sylvester 


Uniontown, Pa. 


1st Yr. Phar. 


Emerson, Howard U. 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Engle, Daniel Evans 


Charles Town 


Soph., B.S.M.E. 


Ehgler, Margaret Barbara 


Wheeling 


Fr., A.B. 


English, Kinsey Durant 


Freeport, Ohio 


1st Yr, Med. 


A.B., Ohio University, 1923. 






Ehigson, Edward 


Morgantown 


Sen., A.B. 


Enochs, Cecil Boone 


Bluefield 


Fr., A.B. 


Erwin, Frank Jackson 


Charleston 


Soph., BJS.C.E. 


Edwin, Olan Kyle 


Ronceverte 


Fr., BjS.Agr. 


Eskins, Eugenia Kerwood 


Chelyan 


Fr., A.B. 


Etter, Dorothy Miller 


Sistersville 


Jun., B.S.H.E. 


Evans, Alma 


Grafton 


Jun., A.B. 


Evans, Benjamin 


Morgantown 


Sen., B.SjC.E. 


Evans, Charles Glenn 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Evans, Emma Virginia 


Weirton 


*Fr., BjS.H.E. 


Evans, Laurence Myers 


Moundsville 


Fr., A.B. 


Everly, Mary Carroll 


Morgantown 


Jun., A.B. 


Everly, Paul Darlington 


Morgantown 


Jun., B.S.E.M. 


Fahey, Margaret Frances 


Moundsville 


Soph., A.B. 


Fairfax, Margaret Gay 


Reedsville 


Jun., A.B. 


Falkenstein, Edna Gladys 


Terra Alta 


Jun., A.B. 


Fallon, Angela Marie 


Clarksburg 


Sonh., BJS.H.E. 


Faris, Eleanor Elizabeth 


Wheeling 


Sen., A.B. 


Farley, Francis Claybourne 


Charleston 


• Jun., A.B. 


Farmer, Clarence Herold 


Bolt 


Jun., B.S.E.M. 


Farnsworth, Dana Lyda 


Cox's Mills 


Soph., A.B. 


Farren, John William 


Harrisville 


Grad., A. & S. 


B.S., in Ch.E., Grove City College. 




Farry, Frank Maston 


East Bank 


Fr., B.S.E.E. 


Faulconer, John Edward 


Hint on 


Fr., A.B. 


Faulkner, George Thomas 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Faulkner, Kathryne Louise 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Faulkner, Lynn Teeumseh 


Morgantown 


Sen., BjS.E.E. 


Faust, Elizabeth Taylor 


Morgantown 


Jun.. A.B. 


Faust, James Hubert 


Meadowbrook 


2d Yr. Phar. 


Feather, Paul Anthony 


Fairmont 


Jun., B.S.C.E. 


Feather, Ruth Marie 


Parsons 


Fr., A.B. 



List of Students 



399 



Fenton, Abraham 
Ferguson, Robert Harrison 
Ferguson, Thomas Ritson 
Ferguson, Willie 
Ferrell, James Wilson 

A.B., West Virginia University, 

Fette, Edna Elizabeth 
Fidler, Ardvern Kemp 
Fields, Shirley Zelda Buller 

A.B., Radclift'e College, 1924. 

Fife, Cyrus Kinsey, Jr. 
Fife, Frances Elizabeth 

A.B., West Virginia University, : 

Fife, Harvey Rowe 

B.S., Morris Harvey College, 1923 

Fife, Mary Virginia 
Fike, Mavy King 
Fink, Benjamin 
Finley, George Albert 
Finnell, Robert Blackman 
Finney, Cecil Glen 
Fish George Everett 
Fisher Dennis Carl 
Fisher, Francis Pierce 
Fisher, Jessie Mabel 
Fisher, Lucile Miller 
Fisher, Ruth Mary 
Fisher, Stanley Robert 
Fisher, Viola 
Fisher, William Glenn 
Fittro, Garnett Leona 
Fitzgerald, Elizabeth Bolden 
Fitzsimmons, Wellesley Day 
Flanagan, Carl Pultz 
Flanagan, Elizabeth Louise 

A.B., West Virginia University , 

Flegel, Perry Stewart 
Fleshman, Darrell Gay 
Fletcher, John Carroll 
Fletcher, Joseph Francis 
Fletcher, Richard Wilson 
Floyd, Ernest Paul 
Fluharty, Ira 
Fluke, Samuel Eancroft 
Flynn, Amy Marie 
Flynn, George David 
Fockler, Hubert Haymond 
Fogel, Lewis 

Ford, Annie Laurie Linn 
Foringer, Richard Leslie 
Forman, Pauline Fae 
Forman, Theodore McClellan 
Forte, Patsy Dominick 
Fortney, Alton Ree 

A.B., West Virginia University, 

Fouchs, Lawrence Earl 
Fox, Gordon 



Charleston 


Fr., A.B. 


Middlebourne 


Jun., A.B. 


Buckhannon 


Sen., B.S., Eng 


Dickson 


Voc. Agr. 


Philippi 


Grad., A. & S. 


1909. 




Wheeling 


Soph., B.S.H.E. 


Tioga 


2d Yr. Med. 


Morgantown 


Grad., A. & S. 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Morgantown 

1923. 


Grad., A. & S. 


Buffalo 


Grad., A. & S. 


Morgantown 


*Fr., A.B. 


Oakland, Md. 


Fr., A.B. 


Bluefield 


*Fr., A.B. 


Clarksburg 


Soph., A.B. 


Keyser 


Sen., A.B. 


Clendenin 


Fr. B.S.Ch.E. 


Buckhannon 


Sen., B.S.E.M 


Morgantown 


Fr., B.S.E.E. 


Parkersburg 


*Fr., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Fairmcnt 


Jun., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Soph., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Soph., A.B. 


Flatwoods 


Sen., B.S.Agr. 


Adamston 


Jun., B.S.H.E. 


Bluefield 


Fr., B.S.H.E. 


Elm Grove 


*Fr., A.B. 


Mannington 


Fr., A.B 


Huntington 


Grad., A. & S. 


,1924. 




Taplin 


Fr., B.S.E.M. 


Walton 


Fr., A.B. 


Charleston 


Fr., B.S.M.E, 


Fairmont 


Jun., A.B. 


Moundsville 


Fr., A.B. 


Glenville 


Jun., B.S.E.E. 


Middlebourne 


Jun., A.B. 


Altoona, Pa. 


1st Yr. Med. 


Morgantown 


Jun., B.S.H.E. 


Morgantown 


Soph., B.S.C.E 


Persinger 


2d Yr. Med. 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Dunbar 


Fr., B.S.H.E. 


West Monterey, 


Pa.Fr., B.S.E.M. 


Morgantown 


Jun., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Jun., B.S.E.E. 


Fairmont 


1st Yr. Phar. 


Thomas 


Grad., A. & S. 


1924. 




New Martinsvill 


e 2d Yr. Phar. 


Sutton 


Fr., A.B. 



400 



West Virginia University 



Foy, Hayward Ward Harding 

B.S., Davis and ETkins College, 1922. 

Frame, Hector Dow Charleston 

Frame, Luke Wright Morgantown 

B.S.Agr.; West Virginia University, 1924. 



Frame, Wilbur Conan 
Frank, Ida Mae 
Frank, Joseph Bruno 
Franks, William Claude 
Frazier, Joseph Bartlett 
Freeman, Gilson Lorenz 
Friedlander, Jack 
Friend, Wayne Zearley 



Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Erie, Pa. 

Uniontown, 

Man 

Piedmont 

Clarksburg 

Charleston 



Pa. 



B.S.Gh.E., West Virginia University, 1924. 

Fuccy, Lewis James Weston 

Fullerton, Max Robe Morgantown 

Fullerton, Mildred Kathleen Morgantown 

Fulton, Charles Thomas, Clarksburg 

Fulton, Clarke Wheeling 

Funk, Fred Jack Fairmont 

Funt, Esther Ida Fairmont 

Funt, Martha Miriam Fairmont 

Furbee, Jack Terra Alta 

Furbee, James Harvey Mannington 

Furbee, Robert Dater Mannington 

Fuss, Leona Katherine Cherry Run 

Gain, Charles Grantham Romney 

Gainer, Henrietta Kathryn Morgantown 

Gainer, James Vincent Morgantown 

Gainer, Leo Bernard Morgantown 

Gainer, Patrick Ward Morgantown 

Gall, George Hugh Belington 

Gall, Robert Martin Philippi 

Gamsjager, John Mathias New Milton 

R.S., Gettysburg College, 1923. 

Gandy, Helen Cobun Morgantown 

Ganer, Ernest Leslie Philippi 

Gans, George Morgantown 

Gapen, Margaretta Jefferson, Pa. 

Gardiner, Mabel Henshaw Martinsburg 

A.B., West Virgiiniia University, 1915. 

Garletts, Virgil Stephen Morgantown 

Garner, Alta Burness Proctor 

Garner, Mildred Mabel Proctor 

Garner, Morris Martinsburg 
Garred, Herbert William David Charleston 

Garrett, John Burdette Mount Hope 

Garrison, Edwin Anderson Parkersburg 

Garrison, William McKinley Moundsville 

BjS.Agr., West Virginia University, 1924. 

Gaston, Lloyd Henry Keyser 

Gates, Alexander Parker Charleston 

Gates, Cecil Raymond Morgantown 

Gatewood, Beatrice Ioda McMechen 

Gatherum, Robert Storrar Athens 

B.S.C.E., West Virginia University, 1907. 

George, Jessie Ethelwyn Morgantown 



1st Yr. Med. 

*Fr., A.B. 
1st Yr. Med. 

3d Yr. Law 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., B,S.Ch.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
*Fr., A.B. 
*Fr., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Grad., Eng'g. 

Jun., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Sen., A.B. 

, BjS.E.M. 

, A.B. 

A.B. 
A.B. 

, B.S.E.M. 

A.B. 

, B.iS.H.E. 



Sen. 

Jun. 

Fr., 

Jun., 

Sen., 

Fr., 

Jun. 



Sen., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Soph., B.S.Agr. 
Sen., A.B. 
Grad., A. & S. 

Jun., A.B. 
Soph., B.S.C.E. 
Fr., A.B. 

Night Class 
Grad., A. & S. 

Soph., BJS.E.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
Jun., B.S.H.E. 
1st Yr. Phar. 
1st Yr. Med. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Grad., Agr. 

Soph., A.B. 
2d Yr. Law 
Sen., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Grad., A. & S. 

2d Yr. Med. 



List of Students 



401 



George, Mary Gaytura 
George, William Taylor, Jr. 
Gertner, Samuel Irving 
Ghiz, Luther Harvey 
Ghiz, Michael 
Gibbons, Virginia Page 
Gibson, Charles Higgins 
Gibson, Mildred Estelle 
Gibson, Raymond Layton 
Gidley, Louis Paul 
Gifford, Warren 

B.S.Agr., West Virginia Unive 

Gifford, Walter Glenn 
Gilbert, Edward McCreary 
Gilbert, Ernest Hoge, Jr. 
Gilbert, Helene Marie 
Gilbert, Mary Brown 
Gill, John William 
Gill, William Raymond 
Gillespie, Elizabeth Lois 
Gillie, Percy Henry 
Gilmore, Delbert Excell 
Gimbert, George Russell 
Giovannitti, Louis Gene 
Given, Clarence Anthony 
Glaros, Thomas 
Glenn, Albert Hudson 
Glisan, Mary Elizabeth 
Glynn, Honora 
Gocke, Mary Catherine 
Godfrey, Allie Howard 

A.B., Emory & Henry College, 

Goff, Aubrey Francesco 
Goff, Fred Hardman 
Good, James William 
Goodall, Albert Lewis 
Goodall, Cecile Roberta 
Goodall, Elizabeth Jane 
Goodall, Ralph Edward 
Goodman, Alfred Vernon 
Goodman, John Vollmer 
Goodwin, George Reay 
Goodwin, Mary Louise 
Gordon, Leonard Howard 
Gore, Charles Findley 
Gorrell, Earl Lewis 
Gorrell, Lewis Oliver 
Gould, Edwin 
Grady, Donald Okey 
Graham, Fred Hartley 
Graham, James Parks 
Gramm, Frederic Wagner 
Gray, Frederick Raine 
Gray, James Howard 
Grav. Robert Thomas 

B.S.Agr., University of Maryland, 

Green, William Thomas 



Philippi 

Philippi 

New York, N 

Logan 

Logan 

Morgantown 

West Union 

Sutton 

Huntersville 

Morgantown 

W T allace 

s.ity, 1923. 

Wilsonburg 
Parkersburg 
Morgantown 
Morgantown 
Morgantown 
Morgantown 
Honey Grove, 
South Charleston 
Charleston 
Parsons 
Oceana, Va. 
Swissvale, Pa. 
Wills 

Youngstown, Ohio 
Elkins 

Morgantown 
Wheeling 
Piedmont 
Morgantown 
1918. 

Glenville 

Clarksburg 

Charleston 

Charleston 

Charleston 

Charleston 

Barnesboro 

Raleigh, N. 

Clarksburg 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Charleston 

Charleston 

Friendly 

Morgantown 

Weston 

Ripley 

Morgantown 

Fairmont 

Charleston 

Rainelle 

Clarksburg 

Lumberport 

1914. 

Charleston 



Fr.. 
*Fr 

Fr., 
Fr., 
Fr., 
Jun., 



A.B. 

A.B. 
A.B. 
A.B. 
A.B. 

A.B. 



Fr., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Soph., B.S.C.E. 
Fr., B.S.C.E. 
Grad., Agr. 

Fr., B.S.E.E. 
Jun., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Sen., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., B.S.M.E. 
Texas2d Yr. Law 
Fr., B.S.H.E. 
Jun., B.S.E.M. 
*Fr., A.B. 
Sen., B.S.Agr. 
1st Yr. Phar. 

A.B. 

A.B. 

A.B. 
A.B. 



Pa. 
C. 



Fr., 

Fr., 

Fr., 

*Fr., 

Soph. 

Jun., 

Grad. 



, A.B. 
A.B. 
, A. & 



S. 



Sen. 
Fr., 
Fr., 
Fr., 

Jun. 



, A.B. 

A.B. 
B.S.E.E. 

A.B. 

, A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
1st Yr. Med. 
1st Yr. Med. 
Jun., A.B. 
1st Yr. Law 
Jun., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
2d Yr. Law 
Sen., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.Ch.E. 
*Fr., B.S.Agr. 
Fr., B. S. E. E. 
Soph., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Sen., B.S.E.E. 
Fr., B.S.E.E. 
Fr., A.B. 
Grad., Agr. 

Fr., A.B. 



402 



West Virginia University 



Greenspon, Lawrence 
Greer, Creed Collins 
Gregoline, Am ad el Ferruccio 
Gregory, Henry Clay 
Gribble, Anna Merle 
Griffin, Beulah Virginia 
Griffin, Grace Margaret 

A.B., University of Wisconsin, 1 

Griffin, Loy Edgar 
Griffith, Evan Llewellyn, Jr. 
Griffiths, Mart William 
Grimm, Robert Burdette 
Grose, Joseph Tyler, Jr. 
Gross, Marian Marshall 
Grubb, Albert Leslie 
Guthrie, J. Hawthaway 
Gwinn, Joseph Kenneth 

Hadden, Harry 'Scott 
Hagan, Edward Franklin 
Ha gar, Mary Elizabeth 
Hager, James Lawrence 



Bluefield 

Parkersburg 

Harding 

Corley 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Madison, Wis. 

L0. 

Wyatt 

Clarksburg 

Beckley 

Littleton 

Fayetteville 

Morgantown 

Berkeley 'Springs 

Charleston 

Hinton 

Princeton 
Hundred 

Weston 
Charleston 



Ph.G., West Virginia University, 1923. 



Hague, Eugene Triplett 
Haislip, Norvell Leonard 



A.B., West Virginia University, 1924. 



Parkersburg 

Wheeling 



Haislip, Richard Connor 
Halbritter, Russell Doyne 



Wheeling 
Tunnelton 



A.B., West Virginia Wesleyan College, 1923. 



Hall, Ave Beatrice 
Hall, Byron William 
Hall, Clifton Sturgis 
Hall, Clyde Hampton 
Hall, Cullen 
Hall, Earl Mason 
Hall, Emil Kermit 
Hall, Grant Pierson, Jr. 
Hall, Harvey Glenn 
Hall, Juanita Rebecca 
Hall, Lillian Kathryn 
Hall, Opal Lucile 
Hall, Robert Edwin 
Hall, Thomas Lee 
Hall, William Conrad 
Haller, Jean Dorothv 
Haller, Mabel Goodwin 
Halloran, Linville Murrell 
Hamby, Ruth Virginia 
Ham ill, Maurice Ralph 
Hamill, Mazie Elizabeth 
Hamill, Maurice Ralph 
Hamilton, Frank 
Hamilton, Glenn Wilson 
Hamilton, Kathryn 
Hammat, Dorothea Lee 
Hammel, Elizabeth Marie 
Hamrick, Lucretia Olive 



Harrisville 

Sutton 

Point Marion, Pa. 

Holstead 

Williamson 

Hinton 

Madison 

Charleston 

Edinboro, Pa. 

Horner 

Harrisville 

Morgantown 

Horner 

McMechen 

Hurst 

Elm Grove 

Morgantown 

Hinton 

Davis 

Mill Creek 

Wheeling 

Mill Creek 

Van Voorhis 

Moundsville 

Morgantown 

Wheeling 

Catonsville, Md. 

Clarksburg 



Fr., A.B. 
1st Yr. Med. 
1st Yr. Med. 
Soph., A.B. 
Sen., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Grad., A. & 



S. 



Jun., B.S.Agr. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Soph., B.S.C.E. 
Soph., B.S.C.E. 
Fr., B.iS.E.E. 

Soph., A.B. 
Jun., B.S.E.M. 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 

Soph., A.B. 
1st Yr. Med. 

Jun., A.B. 
Grad., A. & S. 

Fr., A.B. 

Soph., B.S.Ch.E. 
Jun., B.S.C.E. 
1st Yr. Law 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
*Fr., BjS.Agr. 
3d Yr. Law 
Sen., A.B. 
Soph., B.S.H.E. 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.Agr. 
3d Yr. Phar. 
Jun., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 

, A.B. 

, A.B. 

B.S.C.E. 

A.B. 

B.S.C. 

, A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 



Soph. 

Soph. 

Jun., 

Jun., 

Jun., 

Soph. 



.E. 



List of Students 



403 



Hamrick, Martin Elliott Newburg 

A.B., West Virginia Wesleyan College, 1921. 

Hamrick, May ire Webster Springs 

LL.B., Duqucsne University, 1023. 

Hamrick, Roland Edward Clay 

Hamstead, Ezra Elbert Eglon 

Hannah, Mary Florence Marlinton 

A.B., West Virginia Wesleyan College, 1921. 

Hannah, Besse Edray 

Hannah, Vesta Clio Morgantown 
Hannon, John William Guy Wana 

Hannum, Wilda Belle Levels 

Hanst, George Herbert Kingwood 

Hardin, Nestor Carl Philippi 

Hardman, Harry H. Spencer 

Hardy, Charles Michael Sharon, Pa. 

Hare, Charles Raymond Morgantown 

Hare, Mary Alma Morgantown 

Harkins, Duncan Claire Morgantown 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1921. 
A.M., West Virginia University, 1923. 



Harkins, Harold Earl 
Harlan, Paul Warren 
Harloe, Lucile Frances 
Harmar, Charles 
Harmer, Blanche 
Harmer, Hardin Roads 

A.B. West Virginia University, 

Harney, John Edward 
Harper, Camille DeVol 
Harper, Elizabeth Genevieve 
Harper, Mildred Virginia 
Harpold, Allan Earl 
Harpold, Margaret Helen 
Harrick, William 
Harrington, William Michael 
Harris, Benjamin Franklin 
Harris, Robert Edwin 
Harris, Ronald Daniel 
Harris, Ruth 

A.B., William & Mary College, 

Harrison, Lucien Edgar 
Harsanyi, John 
Harsh, Fairy Virginia 
Harsha, Gene Melford 
Harshbarger, Frances 

B.A., Grinnell College, 1923. 

Harshman, Gerald Kenneth 
Hartley, Alice Evelyn 
Hartley, Carrie Mildred 
Hartley, Luther Sherman 
Hartman, Edwin Thomas 
Hartzell, Gladys Link 
Harvey, John Walker 
Haskins, Emma Louise 
Hastings, Lynn 
Hatfield, Elizabeth Aileen 
Hatfield, E. Thelma 
Hatfield, Ewell Warren 



Morgantown 

Moundsville 

Matoaka 

Tazewell, Va. 

Shinnston 

Shinnston 

1922. 

Scranton, Pa. 

Spencer 

Davis 

Meadowbrook 

Ravenswood 

Ravenswood 

Punxsutawney, Pa. 

Princeton 

Morgantown 

Logan 

Moundsville 

Monongah 

1922. 

Huntington 
Nellis 
Dallas 
Weston 
Onawa, Iowa 

New Salem, Pa. 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Cottageville 

Morgantown 

Shepherdstown 

Oak Hill 

Wheeling 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Charleston 

Charleston 



Grad., A. & S. 

Special, Law 

1st Yr. Med. 
3d Yr. Law 
Grad., A. & S. 

Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
2d Yr. Med. 
Sen., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., B.S.Agr. 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.E.M. 
Fr., A.B. 
Grad., A. & S. 



Jun., B.S.Ch.E. 
Fr., B.S.E.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
3d Yr. Law 



Fr., 

Jun., 

Jun., 

Soph. 

Sen., 

Jun., 



B.S.C.E. 

A.B. 

B.S.H.E. 

, A.B. 

B.S.C.E. 

B.S.H.E. 
Fr., Agr. 
Fr., B.S.E.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.E.E. 
Grad., A. & S. 



Sen., 

Soph. 

Sen., 

Soph. 

Grad. 

Fr., 
Fr., 
Jun. 
Sen. 
Jun. 
Jun. 
Sen. 
Sen. 



B.S.C.E. 
, B.S.E.M. 
A.B. 
, A.B. 
, A. & S. 

A.B. 
A.B. 
, A.B. 

B.S.Agr. 

B.S.E.E. 
, A.B. 
, A.B. 

A.B. 



Special, A. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 



& S. 



404 



West Virginia University 



Hatfield, Forrest Gold R. 


Charleston 


Soph., A.B. 


Haught, Mabel Ida 


Littleton 


Soph., A.B. 


Hawkins, Joseph Allen 


Wardensville 


Jun., A.B. 


Hawley, Roy M'cKinley 


Bluefield 


Jun., A.B. 


Hay, Virginia Elizabeth 


Minneapolis, Minn, 


. Fr., A.B. 


Hayden, Ruth Louise 


Uniontown, Pa. 


Soph., A.B. 


Hayes, Frances Herrington 


Wheeling 


Fr., A.B. 


Hayes, Margaret Ruth 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Hayes, William Stuart 


Morgantown 


Sen., BjS.C.E. 


Hays, Kathleen Tennys 


Parkersburg 


Fr., A.B. 


Hayward, Wilbert John 


Morgantown 


Fr., B.S.E.M. 


Hayzlett, Audra Hillard 


Mullens 


Fr., A.B. 


Headlee, Clarence Ottas 


Morgantown 


Jun., B.S.Agr. 


Heany, Charles Maurice 


Charleston 


Special, Eng'g. 


Heathcote, William Richard 


Morgantown. 


Sen., A.B. 


Hechmer, George Willis 


Grafton 


Fr., BJS.C.E. 


Heck, Henry Albert 


Spencer 


Fr., A.B. 


Hedrick, Forest William 


Greenbank 


Grad., Agr. 


B.S.Agr., West Virginia University, 1923. 




Hedrick, Thomas Day 


Lewisburg 


Jun., B.S.E.E. 


Hefner, Arnold Moore 


Grafton 


Soph., A.B. 


Heilmann, James Bert 


Morgantown 


1st Yr. Law 


Heizer, William Thomas 


Charleston 


Jun., B.S.C.E. 


Heller, Jacob 


Cleveland, Ohio 


1st Yr. Med. 


Helmick, John Pierpont 


Fairmont 


Sen., A.B. 


Hemington, David Emerson 


Uniontown, Pa. 


Jun., A.B. 


Henderson, Mahlon Lucas 


Fairmont 


Sen., B.iS.E.E. 


Henry, Herschel Emery 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Henry, Thomas Stanley 


Morgantown 


Fr., B.S.M.E. 


Hensell, Alouise 


Morgantown 


Fr., BjS.H.E. 


Hensell, Mary Josephine 


Morgantown 


Jun., A.B. 


Henthorn, Max Conaway 


Middlebourne 


*Fr., B.S.Agr. 


Hereford, John Withers 


Morgantown 


Sen., A.B. 


L.L.B., West Virginia University 


•, 1923. 




Hereter, Luis Lorgio 


Caguas, P. R. 


Fr., A.B. 


Hermann, Harry Frederick 


Triadelphia 


Sen., B.S.C.E. 


Herndon, Lyle Kermit 


Charleston 


Jun., B.S,Ch.E. 


Herndon, Nettie Southworth 


Morgantown 


Sen., A.B. 


Her old, George Dana 


Summersville 


3d Yr. Law 


A.B., West Virginia University, 


1924. 




Herron, Olive Eleanor 


So. Brownsville, Pa. Special A. & S. 


Hervey, Henry Jacob 


Morgantown 


Grad., A. & S. 


A.B., West Virginia University, 


1903. 




Herzbrun, Maurice Dewey 


Welch 


Fr., A.B. 


Hess, Dowe Scott 


Cowen 


Soph., A.B. 


Hess, Lester Clay 


Mannington 


Sen., A.B. 


Heyn, Harry Victor 


Hollywood, Calif. 


Soph., A.B. 


Hibbs, Jefferson Walters 


Uniontown, Pa. 


Soph., BjS.Ch.E, 


Hickman, William 


Pennsboro 


1st Yr. Law 


Hicks, Dana Minter 


Webster Springs 


Jun., A.B. 


Hiett, William Henry 


Hanging Rock 


Soph., A.B. 


Higbee, William Brown 


Connellsville, Pa. 


Soph., A.B. 


Higginbotham, John Denten 


Charleston 


Fr., A.B. 


Highland, Stephen Lee 


Clarksburg 


Soph., A.B. 


Hill, Frank Russell 


Charleroi, Pa. 


Fr., A.B. 


Hill, George Delmas 


Camden-on-Gauley 


*Fr., A.B. 


Hill, Harry 


Clayton 


Grad., A. & S. 



M.S., West Virginia University, 1924. 



List of Students 



405 



Hill, Louis Hawes 

Hill, Maud Rymer 

Hill, Pearl 

Hill, Philip Henry 

Hill, Samuel Claude 

Hill, McKinley Tennyson 

Hilliard, John Orval 

Hilliard, Ruth Erma 

Hinerman, Chauncey Depew 

Hines, Kenneth Arden 

B.S., Allegheny College, 1923. 

Hiser, Charles Oscar 
Hiteshew, Beulah Mae 
Hoard, Carlyle Michael 
Hobensack, Roland Henry 
Hodges, Richard Edward 
Hodgson, Catherine Parsons 
Hoffman, Lee Herbert 
Hoffmaster, Mary Jannette 
Hogan, Edward Dunten 
Hoge, Mary Rinehart 
Hogue, Frank William 

A.B., West Virginia University, 

Hogue, James Edgar, Jr. 
Hoke, Dwight Moody 
Hokman, William John 

A.B., Davis and Elkins College, 

Holbert, Carl Clinton 
Holden, James Lemuel 
Holden, Rufus 
Holland, Charles Thomas 
Holland, Robert Paul 
Holland, Virginia Gladys 
Holliday, Harry Afton 
Holmboe, Leo Marcus 
Holmes, Maurice Coffyn 
Holstein, James William 
Holswade, Geo. Washington, J 
Holt, Elizabeth Clyan 
Holtzmann, David Marshall 
Honaker, Harold Rodney 
Hood, Burhl Dye 
Hood, Ralph Glen 
Hopkins, Ralph Joseph 
Hott, George David 

A.M., West Virginia University, 

Householder, Edgar lone 
Houseman, Violet Roxey 
Houston, Clara Ruth 
Houston, James Lloyd 
Houston, Patty 
Howard, Carson Edison 
Howard, Charles Leroy 
Howard, Henry Price 
Hoylman, Margaret 
Hoylman, Mary Virginia 
Hubbs, Nancy Irene 
Huddleton, Eva Malone 



Charleston 


Sen., C.E. 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Middlebourne 


Jun., A.B. 


Morgantown 


2d Yr. Law 


Charleston 


Fr., B.S.E.E. 


Middlebourne 


Voc. Agr. 


Morgantown 


Jun., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Soph., B.S.H.E. 


Cameron 


3d Yr. Law 


Pennsboro 


2d Yr. Med. 


Romney 


Jun., B.S.Agr. 


Cumberland, Md. 


Fr., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Soph., B.S.E.M. 


Parkersburg 


Soph., A.B. 


Alderson 


Soph., B.S.E.E. 


Morgantown 


Jun., A.B. 


Wheeling 


Fr., B.S.C.E. 


Millville 


Sen., A.B. 


Parkersburg 


Sen., A.B. 


Waynesburg, Pa. 


Fr., A.B. 


Paw Paw 


Grad., A. & S. 


1922. 




Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Organ Cave 


2d Yr. Med. 


Elkins 


Grad., A. & S. 


1923. 




Shinnston 


Soph., B.S.C.E. 


Morgantown 


Sen., B.S.Agr. 


Grafton 


*Fr., A.B. 


Winona 


Fr., B.S.E.M. 


Logan 


Jun., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Parkersburg 


Fr., B.S.M.E. 


Clarksburg 


Fr., A.B. 


Raleigh 


Sen., B.S.E.E. 


Kingston 


Soph., A.B. 


r. Spencer 


Sen., B.S.Agr. 


Glenville 


Soph., A.B. 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Fr., A.B. 


Huntington 


Jun., B.S.E.M. 


Williamstown 


Fr., A.B. 


Williamstown 


Sen., A.B. 


Clarksburg 


Sen., A.B. 


Morgantown 


1st Yr. Law 


1924. 




Martinsburg 


1st Yr. Phar. 


St. Marys 


Sen., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Soph., A.B. 


Jeannette, Pa. 


Fr., A.B. 


Cameron 


Jun., A.B. 


Cameron • 


Soph., B.S.C.E. 


Triadelphia 


Soph., A.B. 


Middlebourne 


Fr., A.B. 


Caldwell 


Soph., A.B. 


Pickaway 


Night Class 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Oak Hill 


*Fr., A.B. 



406 



West Virginia University 



Huey, Lawrence George 
Hugh-art, Joseph Marvin 
Hughes, William Chalmers 
Hughes, William Edward 
Hull, Donald Burns 
Humphrey, Edwin Jacob 
Humphrey, Mary Frances 
Humphrey, Thomas Field 
Hunger, William Kingsley 
Hungerford, Frank Lee 
Hungerford, Rebecca 
Hunker, Carrie Belle 
Hunt, Jessie 

Hunter, Charles Herbert 
Hunter, Dale Carlyle 
Hunter, Helen Carolyn 
Hunter, Helen Elizabeth 
Hunter, Hugh Harrison 
Hunter, Mae Rufina 



Mannington 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Parkersburg 

Ridgewood, N. J 

Belleville 

Wheeling 

Wheeling 

Vandergrift, Pa 

Morgantown 

Oak Hill 

Morgantown 

Flatwoods 

Point Marion 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Berkeley Springs 

Morgantown 



Pa. 



A.B., West Virginia Wesleyan College, 1919. 

Hunter, Thomas Bailey Morgantown 

Hurley, Kathleen Wheeling 

Hutchinson, Hugh Frederick Williamson 
Hutchinson, Robert Jay Fairmont 

Hutchison, James Amos Hinton 

Hyde, Robert Peel Shrewsbury Charleston 



Ice, Lester Lucas 

Ice, Letha 

Ihlenf eld, Alfred Edward Carl 

Imholz, Harry William 

Ireland, Carmen Etheiyn 

Ireland, Frances Laone 

Irons, Dale 

Irwin, George William 

Iseminger, Harry Russell 

Isern, Rafael Vilar 

Izzo, Albert 

Jablonsky, Albert 

B.S.M.E., Carnegie Institute of 

Jackson, Carl Curtis 
Jackson, Charles Daniel 
Jackson, Garrett, Jr. 
Jackson, George William 
Jackson, Neva Violet 
Jackson, Wilfred 
Jackson, William Gale 
Jamison, Georgia Garnet 

A.B., West Virginia University, 

Janus, Alexander George 
Jeffers, Ruth Carlton 
Jeffreys, Robert Larew 
Jeffries, Mildred Evelyn 
Jenkins, Mary Lucile 
Jennewine, Frederick Henry 
Jenni, Clyde Bernard 
Jeter,, James Garrett, Jr. 



Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Wheeling 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Colfax 

Homestead, Pa. 

Hagerstown, Md. 

Caguas, P. R. 

Dunibar, Pa. 

Jeannette, Pa. 

Technology, 1922. 

Big Chimney 
Huntington 
Chester 
Jane Lew 
Philip pi 
Elkins 

Williams town 
Morgantown 

1924. 

Montgomery 
Parkersburg 
Grafton 
Morgantown 
Morgantown 
Cheat Haven, Pa. 
Morgantown 
Mount Gay 



Jun., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B 
1st Yr. Med. 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.Agr. 
2d Yr. Law 
Soph., A.B. 
Sen., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.E.E. 
Grad., A. & S. 

2d Yr. Med. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.Agr. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., B.S.E.E. 
Soph., B.S.C.E. 

Fr., B.S.M.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Sen., B.S.E.M. 
Fr., B.S.H.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., B.(S.Ch.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.E.E. 

2d Yr. Med. 

2d Yr. Med. 
Fr., B.S.E.E. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Jun., B.S.Agr. 
Soph., BjS.Ch.E. 
Grad., A. & S. 

Special, A. & S. 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Soph., B.S.E.M. 
Sen., B.S.Ch.E. 
2d Yr. Law 



List of Students 



407 



Jiler, Bernard David 
Jinkerson, Claude Haywood 
Jobes, Virginia Pauline 
Johns, David William 
Johnson, Carl Edward 

A.B., West Virginia University, 

Johnson, Clyde Bosworth 
Johnson, Cornelia Isabel 
Johnson, Frank James 
Johnson, Garland 
Johnson, George McKendree 
Johnson, Helen 
Johnson, Helen Gould 
Johnson, Herman Gordon, Jr. 
Johnson, Howard Melvin 
Johnson, Jesse Ray 
Johnson, Jesse Taliaferro 
Johnson, Lewis Edmond 
Johnson, Marinda Margaret 
Johnson, Mildred Elizabeth 
Johnson, Odes Page 
Johnson, Pauline 
Johnson, Rebecca 
Johnson, Roy Hamlin 
Johnson, Ruth 
Johnson, Wilfred Glenn 
Johnston, Gayle 

A.B., Bethany College, 1921. 

Johnston, John Scott 
Johnston., Olive Mae 
Johnston, Walter Broughton 
Jollev, Amy Irene 
Jolliffe, Martha Ellen 
Jolliffe, Mary Esther 

B.S.H.E., West Virginia Univers 

Jolliffe, Norman Hayhurst 

B.S., West Virginia University, 

Jolliffe, Sarah Van 
Jones, Carter Dunnington 
Jones, Edwin Channing 
Jones, Elsie Mabel 
Jones, Ethel Maude 
Jones, Geneva Eleanor 
Jones, Geoffrey Page 
Jones, Gladys Luceille 
Jones, Harry Benjamin 
Jones, Mary Virginia 
Jones, Mildred Grace 
Jones, Robert Harold 
Jones, William J., Jr. 
Judy, Dorothy Pierce 

Kahn, Benjamin Dan 

B.S., Colgate University, 1915. 

Kalo, Albert Martin 
Kammer, Rita Marie 
Kane, Thomas Leiper 
Kane, William Edward 



Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 


*Fr., A.B. 


Mooseheart, 111. 


Fr., A.B. 


Pennsboro 


Fr., B.S.H.E. 


Glasgow 


Jun., B.S.C.E. 


Thomas 


2d Yr. Med. 


1924. 




Charleston 


Soph., B.S.E.E. 


Franklin 


Jun., A.B. 


Anawalt 


1st Yr. Med. 


Bridgeport 


Soph., A.B. 


Parkersburg 


Fr., A.B. 


Keyser 


Jun., A.B. 


Wheeling 


Sen., A.B. 


Elkins 


Fr., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Huntington 


2d Yr. Med. 


Meadow Bridge 


2d Yr. Med. 


Berkeley Springs 


1st Yr. Law 


Maiden 


Jun., A.B. 


Parkersburg 


Soph.. A.B. 


Morgantown 


Fr., B.S.C.E. 


Frametown 


*Fr., B.S.H.E. 


Kevser 


Jun., B.S.H.E. 


Wolf Summit 


Sonh., A.B. 


Fairmont 


Sen., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Warsaw, Ohio 


Grad., A. & S. 


Wheeling 


Jun., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Soph., A.B. 


McDowell 


Fr., A.B. 


Follansbee 


Soph., A.B. 


Grafton 


Sen.. B.S.H.E. 


Morgantown 


Grad., H.E. 


ity, 1920. 




Morgantown 


Grad., A. & S. 


1923. 




Morgantown 


Soph., A.B. 


Fairmont 


Jun., A.B. 


Smithton 


Sen., B.S.E.E. 


Morgantown 


Jun. A.B. 


Morgantown 


Jun. A.B. 


Morgantown 


Sen., A.B. 


Charleston 


Soph., B.S.M.E 


Clarksburg 


Jun., A.B. 


Thayer 


Fr., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Soph., B.S.H.E. 


Fairmont 


Soph., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Grad., Agr. 


Davis 


Fr., A.B. 


Fairmont 


Grad., A. & S. 


Morgantown 


Soph., B.S.E.E. 


Wheeling 


Soph., A.B. 


Kane, Pa. 


Fr., A.B. 


F^tcairn, Pa. 


Fr., A.B. 



408 



West Virginia University 



Kautz, Wilbur Charles 
Kay, Dorothy 
Kay, Hubert Ames 
Kaylor, John, Jr. 

A.B., West Virginia University, 

Kayser, Fayne Albert 
Keefer, Clarence Edwin 
Keener, Joseph Lindell, Jr. 
Keenly, Kendall Haworth 
Keighron, Eugene Leonard 
Keith, Harry 
Keller, Frederick Doyle 
Kelley, Dana Paul 
Kelley, Sarah Hazel 
Kellman, George Max 
Kelly, Anna 
Kelly, Clyde Ernest 

B.A., Bucknell University, 1924. 

Kelly, Eugene TJiomas 
Kelly, Francis Benedict 
Kelly, Liguori Joseph 
Kemper, Virgil Hamilton 
Kendrkk, James Garrison 
Kennedy, Clyde Raymond 
Kennedy, Harry Greene 
Kenney, Bertha Virginia 
Kenney, Estel ISheets 
Kenny, Winifred 
Kerr, Clarence Henry 
Kesling, William Carl 
Kessinger, John Leslie 
Kester, Freda Ellen 
Ketchum, 'Robert Dicker son 
Keys, Florence Rebecca 
Keys, Frank Glendel 
Kight, John Henry 
Kight, Joshua Ledane 
Kincaid, Harlan Burdette 
Kindelberger, Margaret F. 
Kindelberger, Martha Louise 
King, Elzie Marion 
King, Genevieve Nanete 
King, Harmon Richard 
King, Russell Warden 
King, Samuel Rodgers 
Kinney, Charles Encil 
Kirchner, Ralph Nisus 
Kirker, Estel la Clendenin 
Kirtley, Charles Hampton 
Kishbaugh, Clayce Gordon 
Kisner, Albert George 
Kittle, George Monroe 
Klages, Ellett Huber 
Klein, Jack 

Klostermeyer, Howard R. 
Knapn, Lewis William 

A.B., Bethany College, 1923. 

Knapp, Ruth Berkley 



Charleston 


Fr., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Soph., A.B. 


Morgan town 


Soph., A.B. 


Graham Station 

Q9A 


1st Yr. Law 


Morgantown 


1st Yr. Med. 


Cameron 


Fr., A.B. 


Morgantown 


*Fr., A.B. 


Ravenswood 


Jun., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Harrisville 


Fr., A.B. 


Parkersburg 


Soph., A.B. 


Masontown 


Fr., B.S.M.E. 


Brandonville 


Soph., A.B. 


Beckley 


Soph., A.B. 


Wheeling 


Soph., A.B. 


Scottdale, Pa. 


1st Yr. Med. 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Fr., BjS.C.E. 


Tunnelton 


Fr., A.B. 


Piedmont 


3d Yr. Phar. 


Morgantown 


1st Yr. Med. 


Weston 


Fr., B.S.Agr. 


Porter's Falls 


Soph., A.B. 


Charleston 


Jun., B.S.E.M. 


Morgantown 


Jun., B.S.H.E. 


Charleston 


Soph., A.B. 


Wheeling 


Soph., A.B. 


Pennsboro 


Soph., A.B. 


Gassaway 


1st Yr. Phar. 


Princeton 


Soph., B..S.E.E, 


Clarksburg 


Sen., B.S.H.E. 


Charleston 


Soph., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Night Class 


Middlebourne 


Fr., A.B. 


Rido-elev 


Jun., A.B. 


Ridgeley 


Jun., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Fr., B.S.E.E. 


Wheeling 


Soph., A.B. 


Wheeling 


Fr., A.B. 


Clarksburg 


Fr., A.B. 


Huntington 


Fr., A.B. 


Kingwood 


*Fr., A.B. 


Charleston 


Jun., B.S.E.M. 


Ripley 


Fr., A.B. 


Fairmont 


Jun., B.S.C.E. 


Welch 


Fr., B.S.E.E. 


Wellsfourg 


Jun., A.B. 


Huntington 


Fr., B.S.E.E. 


Clarksburg 


Fr., A.B. 


Fairmont 


Sen., B.S.E.E. 


Philippi 


Soph., A.B. 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 


2d Yr. Law 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Soph., A.B. 


Charleston 


2d Yr. Law 


Bethany 


Grad., A. & S. 


Morgantown 


Fr., B.S.H.E. 



List of Sri dents 



409 



Knopp, Helen Keith 
Knopp, Virgil Sylvester 
Knotts, Ronald Lawrence 
Kimtti, Ralph Eddy 

A.B., West Virginia University, 

Kohler, Charles 
Kokenes, Peter George 
Konrad, John Jacob 
Koon, Charles Fay 
Kopelman, Samuel David 
Rough, Other o Snrin?er 
Kraft, Elizabeth Sarah 
Kramer, Fred Herman 
Kramer, Hunter Nickell 
Kranaskas, Cecelia Samueline 
Krebs, Walter Fred 
Krickovic, Stephen 
Kuhn, Ernest Guy 
Kurtz, Kenneth Swan 

A.B., West Virginia University, 

Kuykendall, James Sloan, Jr. 

LaBarre, Nestor Marshall 
Lafferty, Clarence Paul 
Lafferty, Mary Jane M. 
Lafollette, Latelle McKee, Jr. 

A.B., Swarthmor-a College, 1914. 

Laing, Alexander Wright, Jr. 
Lakin, Florence Katherine 
Lambert, Charles Patton 
Lambert, Harry Bonner 
Lambert, John Wilfred 
Lambert, Wintford 
Lane, John Thomas 
Langntt, Lyle Edgar 
Langfitt, Walter Nelson 
Langfried, Olive Lee 
Lanham, Kathleen Loye 
Larimer, Paul Davis 
Larrison, Millard Samuel 
Larue, George William 
Latham, George Robert 
Latham, Winchester Thayer 
Laughlin, Gladys 
Law, Carolyn Waldo 
Lawrence, Elizabeth Adelaide 
Lawson, George Cowen 
Lawson, Helen Verniece 
Lawson, Leon Kline 
Lawson, Marguerite Loraine 
Lawson, Mason Glenn 
Lawson, Stanley King 
Layman, Earl E. 
Lazzell, Francis Delmar 
Leachman, Lucille Margarette 
Leavitt, Charles 
Leavitt, Elizabeth Anne 
Lee, Raymond Clarence 



Alderson 
Parkersburg 
Grafton 
Morgantown 

1923. 

New Castle, Pa. 
Wheeling 
Killarney 
Monongah 
Vandergrift, Pa. 
Uniontown, Pa. 
Wellsburg 
Parkersburg 
Ronceverte 
9 Thomas 
Holliday's Cove 
Maidsville 
Farming ton 
Weston 

1924. 

Romney 

Salem 

Moundsville 
Moundsville 
Charleston 

Charleston 

Charleston 

Bluefield 

Parsons 

Huntington 

Morgantown 

Clarksburg 

West Union 

Parkersburg 

Cameron 

Tunnelton 

Patton, Pa. 

St. Albans 

Masontown 

Elkins 

Buckhannon 

Warsaw, Ohio 

Clarksburg 

Morgantown 

South Charleston 

Elm Grove 

Bridgeport 

Weston 

Stallings 

Elm Grove 

Montana Mines 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Parkersburg 

Parkersburg 

Middlebourne 



Jun., A.B. 
Jun., B.S.M.E. 
*Fr., A.B. 
1st Yr. Med. 

Fr., A.B. 
2d Yr. Med. 
Fr., B.S.C.E. 
Sen., A.B. 
1st Yr. Med. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Soph., B.S.E.E. 
1st Yr. Law 
1st Yr. Phar. 
Fr., B.S.Ind.Ed. 
Soph., B.S.E.M. 
Jun., A.B. 
2d Yr. Law 

*Fr., A.B. 

1st Yr. Med. 
Fr., A.B. 
*Fr., B.S.H.E. 
1st Yr. Law 

Soph., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
*Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Soph., B.S.E.E. 
Sen., B.SAgr. 
Jun., A.B. 
Sen., B.S.C.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.H.E. 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.E.E. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., B.S.E.E. 
Soph., B.S.C.E. 
Special B.S.H.E. 
Fr.. B.S.H.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
Voc. Agr. 
Soph., B.S.H.E. 
Sen., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 

Agr. 

, B.S.E.M. 

B.S.H.E. 

A.B. 

A.B. 

A.B. 



Voc. 

Soph. 

Jun., 

*Fr., 

Jun., 

Jun., 



410 



West Virginia University 



Lee, Russell Tyree 


Clarksburg 


Fr., A.B. 


Leeson, Clarence Eugene 


Ravenswood 


Soph., A.B. 


Leffingwell, Harold Randall 


Charleston 


2d Yr. Med. 


B.S., Allegheny College, 1923. 






Lehman, Josephine Anna 


Fairmont 


Fr., A.B. 


Lehman, Margaret Lee 


Charleston 


Soph., A.B. 


Lehman, William Parry 


Fairmont 


1st Yr. Law 


Leith, Theodric Bryant 


Morgantown 


Grad., A. & S. 


A.B., Washington and Lee University, 1916. 




Lemley, Edis Lee 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Lemley, Herman Ashley 


Parkersburg 


Fr., Ind. Eng'g, 


Lemley, Nell Gertrude 


Morgantown 


Soph., A.B. 


Lemley, Virginia Martin 


Parkersburg 


Jan., B.S.H.E. 


Lemley, William Corbley 


Morgantown 


1st Yr. Law 


Leonard, Catherine Elizabeth 


Mannington 


Fr., B.,S.H.E. 


Lepera, Alice Virginia 


Morgantown 


Jun., A.B. 


Lepera, Emory 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Lepera, Frank 


Morgantown 


Sen., B.S.C.E. 


Leppert, Charles Lynville 


Morgantown 


Sen., A.B. 


Lester, Frank Mack 


Oakvale 


Voc. Agr. 


Levings, Fanny Parker 


Romney 


Sen., A.B. 


Lewis, Charles Cameron, Jr. 


Point Pleasant 


Fr., B.S.Agr. 


Lewis, Clarence Emerson 


Charleston 


Fr., A.B. 


Lewis, David Hamilton 


Fairmont 


Soph., A.B. 


Lewis, Emily Marie 


Morgantown 


*Fr., A.B. 


Lewis, Hiram Carson 


Charleston 


Soph., B.S.C.E. 


Lewis, John Lambert 


Charleston 


Fr., A.B. 


Lewis, Joseph ,Stuart, Jr. 


Oak Hill 


Jun., A.B. 


Lewis, Mary Lorrayne 


Newburg 


Soph., A.B. 


Lewis, William Gordon 


The Plains, Va. 


Fr., B.S.C.E. 


Lewis, William Peyton 


Charleston 


Soph., B.S.M.E. 


Lewis, Wilmer M. 


Madison 


Fr., BjS.E.E. 


Liller, Henry Olive 


Keyser 


Jun., A.B. 


Lilly, Madalyn Mclntyre 


Morgantown 


Fr., BjS.H.E. 


Lilly, Martin Luther 


Madison 


Fr., B.S.C.E. 


Lilly, Robert Glenn 


Charleston 


2d Yr. Law 


Lilly, Thelma 


Charleston 


Fr., A.B. 


Lindell, Nora Josephine 


Follansbee 


Soph., A.B. 


Lindley, Albert 


Tarns 


Fr., BjS.E.E. 


Linger, Rella Fern 


Huttonsville 


Jun., B.S.H.E. 


Linn, Mildred 


Fairmont 


Soph., A.B. 


Lisagor, Diana 


Princeton 


Fr., A.B. 


Litsinger, Edward Andrew 


Hinton 


1st Yr. Med. 


Littlepage, Charles Frazier 


Charleston 


Fr., A.B. 


Livezey, Halard Michael 


St. Albans 


Jun., B.S.C.E. 


Lizza, Maxwell Eugene 


Morgantown 


Soph., A.B. 


Llewellyn, Eleanor Holliday 


Morgantown 


Grad., A. & S. 


A.B., Western College for Women, 1914. 




LLeweliyn, Frank Bowman 


Morgantown 


Grad., A. & S. 


A.B., West Virginia University, 


1912. 




Lloyd, Edith Madelon 


Charleston 


Sen., A.B. 


Lloyd, Ella Mae 


Fairmont 


Fr., A.B. 


Lloyd, Martha Barrett 


Morgantown 


Soph., A.B. 


Locke, Lillian Doris 


St. Marys 


Fr., B.S.H.E. 


Long, Earnest Raymond 


Littleton 


Soph., B.S.E.E. 


Long, Evelyn Louise 


Bluefield 


Sen., A.B. 


Long, Irene Charlotte 


New Cumberland 


Fr., A.B. 


Long, Jay Everett 


Morgantown 


Jun., A.B. 



List of Students 



411 



Long, Kell 

Long - , Kinney Everett 
Long, Virginia Dare 
Loper, Robert Edmund 
Lopinsky, Samuel David 
Lord, Howard Garland 
Lorentz, Leonard Mactagart 
Lorentz, Matilda 
Lorentz, Thomas Joseph 
Loudin, Margaret Elizabeth 
Lough, Dana Glenn 
Lough, Longfellow Livingston 
Lough, Victor Nay 
Love, Charles Marion, Jr. 

A.B., West Virginia University, 

Love, Gilbert Watson 
Love, John Bushnell 
Love, Kenneth Anderson 
Lovett, Thelma 
Lowe, John Moore 

B.S.Agr., West Virginia Univers 

Lowry, Hubert David 

A.B., West Virginia University, 

Lowther, Genevieve 
Lowther, Stefanie Roesch 
Lowther, William Ernest 
Ludwig, George Philip 
Lunter, Mary 
Lustgarten, Earl Matthew 
Lyall, Lucian Hite 
Lynch, Charles Scott 
Lynch, Henry Dorr 

Mace, Vernie Emmette 
MacEwan, Cornelia 
Machesney, John Wilfred 
Madera, William Luther 
Madert, Matthias 
Madigan. Glen Dale 
Madill, Robert Boyd 
Magee, Howard Printes 
Malian, Walter Everett 
Makholm, Christen Adam 
Malley, George Calistus 
Malloy, John Paul 

LL.B., Catholic University, 1923. 

Maloney, Cecilia Hoyt 
Maloney, Augustine Joseph 
Maloney, Leonard Eugene 
Manley, Hugh Elton 

A.B., West Virginia University, 

Mann, Fletcher Wills 
Manning, Helen Virginia 
Marcum, Fred Breckenridge 
Marines, George Peter 
Marino, Vincent Louis 
Markley, Joseph Alexander 
Marlow, Richard 



Connellsville, Pa. 

Northfork 

Pine Grove 

Cameron 

Charleston 

Morgantown 

Buckhannon 

McMechen 

McMechen 

Morgantown 

Point Marion, Pa. 

Flemington 

Hundred 

Huntington 

1924. 

Elm Grove 
Elm Grove 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Bulltown 
Morgantown 

ity, 1918. 

Huntington 

1923. 

Clarksburg 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Rio 

Clarksburg 

Wheeling 

Morgantown 

Glenville 

Clarksburg 

Charleston 
Orwell, Ohio 
Morgantown 
Morgantown 
Morgantown 
Morgantown 
Shinnston 
Mannington 
Follansbee 
Jersey City, N. J. 
Parkers burg 
Weston 
•♦ 
New Rochelle, N. 
Waterbury, Conn. 
Hinton 
Monongah 

1923. 

Athens 

Moundsville 

Irvine, Ky. 

Wheeling 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Parkersburg 



Fr., B.S.Ch.E. 
Soph., B.S. 
Soph., A.B. 
1st Yr. Phar. 
Soph., A.B. 
Jun., B.S.C.E. 

A.B. 

A.B. 

, B.S.M.E. 

A.B. 

B.S.Agr. 
, B.S.Agr. 
B.S.M.E. 



Jun. 

Sen., 

Soph. 

Sen., 

Fr., 

Jun. 

Fr., 



2d Yr. Law 

Soph., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Special, A. & S. 
Soph., A.B. 
Grad., Agr. 

Grad., A. & S. 

Jun., A.B. 
Sen., A.B. 
Special, A. & S. 
Jun., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
1st Yr. Med. 
Jun., A.B. 
Sen., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.E.E. 

Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
2d Yr. Med. 
Special, A. & S. 
Fr., B.S. M.E. 
Fr., A.B. • 
Soph., B.S.M.E. 
3d Yr. Law 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., B.S. 
3d Yr. Law 

Y.Jun., A.B. 
1st Yr. Med. 
Soph., A.B. 
Grad., A. & S. 

Jun., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.E.E. 
1st Yr. Med. 
Soph., A.B. 
Soph., B.S.E.M. 



412 



West Virginia University 



Marshall, Cornelia 
Marshall, Jerry Reuben 
Marshall, Melvin C. 
Marshall, Russell Chauney 
Marshall, Vellira 
Martin, Albert Hugh 
Martin, Alonzo Kenneth 
Martin, Carman Ira 
Martin, Elizabeth Gillespie 
Martin, Frank Marion 
Martin, Grace 
Martin, James Harold 
Martin, Mattie Elizabeth 
Martin, Robert Dallas, Jr. 
Martin, Seba James 
Martin, Thomas Carlyle 
Martin, Walter James 
Mason, Catherine Lois^ 
Mason, Kermit Raymond 
Mason, Medora Mae 
Mason, Vivian 
Mason, Winifred Genevieve 
Masoncupp, Luther Forrest 
Massey, Guy Matthews 
Matheny, John Wesley 

A.B., West Virginia Wesleyan College, 1921. 

Matheson, Thomas Clyde IVLorgantown 

Mattson, Ellen Anna Morgantown 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1915. 
A.M., West Virginia University, 1921. 

Maust, Edwin Elsworth 
Maust, Grace Irene 
Maxwell, Cyrus Haymond, Jr. 

M.S., University of Illinois, 1922 

Mayfield, Herbert Densil 
Mayolo, Peter Louis 
Mazo, Herbert Rubert 
McBee, Alfred Roy 
McBee, Ethel Carle 

A.B., West Virginia University, 

McBee, Ruth Mildred 
McCarl, Jennett Hannah 

A.B., Salem College, 1923. 

MeCarnes, Arthur Pearson 
MeCarnes, Edwin John 
McClellan, Ernest Edward 
McClintic, Alice 
MeClung, Eleanor Mary 
MeClung, Jacob O. 
MeClung, Wyatte Nelson 

B.S.Agr., West Virginia University, 1921. 

Mc'Connell, Susan Agnes Morgantown 

McCormick, Wilbur Carl Congo 

McCoy, Paul Edgar Letart 

B.S.Agr., West Virginia University, 1924. 

MeCrary, Clinton Runciman Ronceverte 
MeCray, 'Charles Bickerton Elm Grove 

MdCray, Frances Virginia Reta Fairmont 
McCreery, Harry Lacey Beckley 



Sunlight 

Wades town 

Wheeling 

Skyles 

Huntington 

Monongah 

Charleston 

Maysville 

Charleston 

Moundsville 

Morgantown 

Biuefield 

Fairmont 

Wheeling 

Shinnston 

Morgantown 

Clarksburg 

Meyersdale, Pa. 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Keyser 

Morgantown 

Charleston 

South Charleston 

Montgomery 



Morgantown 
Clifton Mills 
Morgantown 

Middlebourne 

Keyser 

Huntington 

Flemington 

Morgantown 

1905. 

Morgantown 
Mannington 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Ethel 

Marlinton 

Sinks Grove 

Rupert 

Morgantown 



Fr., 

Sen 
Jun 

ft 



Sen., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
1st Yr. Phar. 
Jun., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
A.B. 
., A.B. 
A.B. 
»en., B.iS.C.E. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Sen., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.E.E. 
Jun., BjS.Agr. 
Sen., B.S.Agr. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
1st Yr. Law 
Jun., A.B. 
Sen., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
*Fr., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Grad., A. & S. 



Fr., A.B. 
Grad., A. 



& S. 



Fr., B.S.E.E. 
Fr., A.B. 
1st Yr. Med. 

Fr., B.S.E.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Grad., A. & S. 

Soph., B.S.H.E. 
Jun., B.S.H.E. 

Soph., A.B. 
Soph., B.S.C.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Jun., BiS.H.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
Grad., Agr. 

Jun.. A.B. 
1st Yr. Med. 
Grad., Agr. 

Soph., B.S.E.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 



List of Students 



413 



McCue, Jessie Hookersville 

McCullough, Bernard Mole Hill 

McCuskey, Frank Crim Middlebourne 

B.S.Agr., West Virginia University, 1915. 

McCutcheon, Mayme Lorraine Webster Springs 

McDaniel, Madge Beatrice Meadowbrook 

McDaniel, Wayne Sturm Grafton 

McDermott, Agnes Bernadine Cameron 

McDermott, 'Joseph Henry, Jr. Morgantown 

McDonald, Bernard Morgantown 

McDonald, DeWitt Clay Morgantown 

McDonald, Lois French Creek 

McDonald, Richard Clyde Inwood 

B.S.Agr., West Virginia University, 1923. 

McDonald, Verda Blanche Morgantown 

A.B., West VirginJia University, 1921. 

McDowell, Donald Claredon Fairmont 

McDowell, Gladys 

McElroy, Dennis Lee 

McElroy, Lillian Kathryn 

McElroy, Lillian*. Yost 

McElroy, William Dale 

McFadden, Virginia Katherine 

McGee, Lazier Smith 

McGee, Marjorie 

McGee, William Buster 

McGinnis, Claire 

McGinnis Marguerite Evelyn 

McGinnis, William Holroyd 

McGovran, Edward Ranson 

McGowan, Harry Samuel 

McGrail, James Bernard 

McGuinness, George Alfred 

McHenry, Charles Ross 

Mclntire, George Benton 

B.S.Agr., West Virginia University, 1922. 

Mclntire, George Lyle New Martinsville 

Mclntire, James Thomas New Martinsville 

Mcintosh, Marearet Elizabeth Elkins 
Mcintosh, Margaret Ellen Ravenswood 

McKain, Andrew Francis Monongah 

McKain, Charles Joseph Monongah 

McKee, Edward Frank Triadelphia 

McKeever, Ivan Frankford 

McKelvey, Catherine Buchanan Morgantown 
McKenzie, Ellen Thompson Cresaptown, Md. 

McKenzie, Eugene Eaton 
McKinney, Gertrude Mathis 
McLain, Ruth Alice 
McLaughlin, Vida Leone 
McMahon, Perry Reed 
McMaster, James Parke 
McMillan, Gordon Dunlap 
McMillen, Herbert 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1916. 

McMillen, Pauline Morgantown 

B.S.H.E., West Vii-ginia University, 1924. 

McMillion, Theodore Williamsburg 



Lewisburg 

Moundsville 

Wheeling 

Fairview 

Morgantown 

Bethany 

Meadowbrook 

Morgantown 

Charleston 

Harrisville 

Morgantown 

Beckley 

Charleston 

Elm Grove 

Terra Alta 

New Kensington,Pa, 

Parkersburg 

Morerantown 



Sen., A.B. 
Sen., B.S.E.E. 
Grad., A. & S. 

Jun., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.E.E. 
Jun., A.B. 
*Fr., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.Agr. 
2d Yr. Med. 
Jun., B.S.H.E. 
Grad., Agr. 

Grad., A. & S. 

Soph., B.S.E.M. 
Soph., A.B. 
Soph., B.S.E.M. 
Fr., A.B. 
A.B. 

B.S.Ch.E. 
B.S.H.E. 
B.S.E.M. 
., A.B. 



Elgood 

Fairmont 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Glendale 

East Bank 

Minneapolis, 

Morgantown 



Minn. 



Jun., 

Jun., 

Fr., 

Sen., 

Soph 

1st Yr. Med. 

Fr., A.B. 

Sen., B.S.H.E. 

Special Law 

Sen., B.S.Agr. 

Soph., B.S.E.E. 

Soph., BjS.C.E. 

2d Yr. Med. 

Fr., A.B. 

Grad., Agr. 

Soph., B.S.E.M. 
*Fr., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
2d Yr. Law 
Fr., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Sen., A.B. 
2d Yr. Med. ■ 
Jun., A.B. 
Soph., B.S.H.E. 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Grad., A. & S. 

Grad., A. & S. 

Soph., A.B. 



414 



West Virginia University 



Charleston 

Madison 

Morgantown 

Mounds ville 

Wheeling 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Huntington 

Beckley 

Huntington 

Raleigh 

Charleston 

Beckley 

Huntington 

Charleston 

Middleibourne 

Wakefield, N. H. 

C larks/burg 
Springfield, Mass. 
Parkersburg 
Martinsburg 
McKeesport, Pa. 



Soph. 
Soph. 



McMurrer, Patrick Daniel Charleston Jun., B.S.E.M. 

Mc'Neely, Ted Raymond Madison *Fr„ BjS.Agr. 

McNeill, Mary Eileen Morgantown Sen., A.B. 

McNinch, Hazel Virginia 

McParland, Rose 

McQueen, David Hugh 

McQueen, Marian Elizabeth 

McVey, Hobart Bascom 

Mead, Andrew Sabine 

Mead, Charles Powell 

Meador, Palma Groves 

Meadows, Roscoe Oley 

Meadows, Ross Williams 

Meadows, Umburta 

Means, Lena Lee 

Medis, Paul Lunsford 

Mee, Robert Amos 

A.B., Go'lluirublia University, 1923. 

Meeks, Edward Arthur 
Megazzini, Adolphus Roland 
Meintel, George Edward 
Melintz, Paul Richard 
Menderson, William Thomas 

Ph.G., Philadelphia College of Medioine, 1924 

Menefee, Emily Morgantown 

Menendez, Florinda Meadowbrook 

Meredith, Jess Harper Fairmont 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1924. 

Meredith, Mabel Virginia Kingwood 

Metzler, Sank Ross Morgantown 
Michael, Kenneth Estabrooke Morgantown 

Michael, Mary Jean Morgantown 

Michael, Nicholas Weirton 

Michael, iSamuel Edgar Martinsburg 

Michel, Werner Casper Morgantown 

D.P.S., Berne University, 1917. 

Michels, Pearl Elisabeth Morgantown 

Michels, Ralph West Union 

Mick, Myra Lynch Glenville 

Mick, Oscar Glenville 

Mildren, Alice Gertrude Holliday's Cove 

Milhoan, Asa Wade Murraysville 

Milhorn, Earl Chester Wheeling 

Millender, Alfred Franklin Sidney 

MiTlender, Joseph Chattaroy 

Miller, Aldene Fairview 

Miller, Benjamin Franklin Grafton 

Miller, Clay Vaden, Jr. Grafton 

Miller, Emma Ruth Tunnelton 
Miller, Jeannette Elizabeth Parkersburg 

Miller, John Ripley 

Miller, Kenneth Neil Paden City 

Miller, LeRoy Brooks Morgantown 

Miller, Mary Ethel Rockwood, Pa. 

Miller, Myrtle Mae Cameron 

Miller, Rufus Glenn Kingwood 

Miller, Samuel Owen Fairmont 

Miller, Theodore Clarke Morgantown 



B.S.H.E. 

A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Jun., . B.S.C.E. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
1st Yr. Law 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
2d Yr. Law 
*Fr., B.S.H.E. 
Fr., B.S.E.E. 
1st Yr. Med. 

Jun., A.B. 
Soph., B.S. Ch.E. 
Jun., B.S.E.E. 
Jun., A.B. 
1st Yr. Med. 

Soph., A.B 
Fr, A.B. 
2d Yr. Law 

Sen., B.S.H.E. 
*Fr., A.B. 
3d Yr. Law 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., B.S.C.E. 
-Special, A. & S. 

Fr., A.B. 
3d Yr. Phar. 
Sen., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Sen., B.S.H.E. 
2d Yr. Med. 
Soph., B.-S.M.E. 
Jun., B.S.Agr. 
Fr., B.S.E.M. 
Soph, A.B. 
Soph., BiS.M.E. 
Jun., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
*Fr., A.B. 

BjS.Agr. 
A.B. 

A.B. 

A.B. 

A.B. 
Special Law 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.E.E. 



*Fr, 
Soph 
Sen., 
Sen., 
Jun, 



List of Students 



415 



Miller, William Henry Oak Hill 

A.B., Ashland College, 1916. 

Minnich, Edgar Ray New Cumberland 

Miser, Mary Elizabeth Holliday's Cove 

Mish, Arnold Franklin Inwood 

Mish, Helen Elizabeth Bunker Hill 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1920. 

Mitchell, Paul Clifford Welch 

Moats, Benjamin Parkersburg 

Moats, Oleta Kelcel Morgantown 

Mogan, Christopher Joseph, Jr.Charleroi, Pa. 



Monack, Albert James 
Monday, Carl Pleasant 
Monroe, Neva Marguerite 
Montgomery, Noble Lee 
Montgomery, Wilda Lea 
Montgomery, William Newton 
Moody, Charles Oliver 
Moomau, Lillian Eena 
Moore, Charles Wendell 
Moore, Gerard Davis, Jr. 
Moore, James William 
Moore, Thomas Jefferson 
Moore, William Smith 
Morgan, Claude Moore 
Morgan, Emily Josephine 
Morgan Howard Hutchison 
Morgan, Marian Virginia 
Morgan, William Dudley 



Morgan, Wm. Steenbergen, Jr.Pliny 



Charleroi, Pa. 

Charleston 

Mannington 

Tunnelton 

Morgantown 

Kingwood 

Kingwood 

Greenbank 

New Salem, Pa. 

Ranson 

Fairmont 

Morgantown 

Clarksburg 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Bellaire, Ohio 

Morgantown 

Brady 



Mooris, Leila Elsworth 
Morris, Russell Witcher 

A.B., Marshall College, 1923. 

Mooris, Warren Francis 
Morris, William Loyd, Jr. 
Morrison, Clarence Harold 
Morrison, Carroll Harpold 
Morrison, Edward Thomas 
Morrison, Okey Johnson 
Morton, Belle Virginia 
Morton, Eskridge McCray 
Morton, Stephen Dixon 
Mosby, Heber Lee 
Moser, Charles Yarnall 
Moss, Beverly Turpin 
Mossburg, Lucy 
Mountain, William Watson 
Muir, Robert Miller 
Mullan, George Oscar 
Muller, Henry Schulz 
Mullins, Edwin Maxey 
Munchmeyer, Louis .Wells 
Munn, Clara 

Murphy, Delphin Delmas 
Murphy, Franklin Boyd 
Murphy, Hickman Charles 
Murphy, Wallace B. 
Murrill, Walter Ware 



Grad., A. & S. 

Fr., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Grad., A. & S. 



Soph 
Soph 
Jun., 
Jun., 
Soph 
Soph 
Soph 
Fr., 



Cameron 
Huntington 

New Martinsville 

Morgantown 

Elm Grove 

Charleston 

Erie, Pa. 

Charleston 

Camden-on-Gauley 

Webster Springs 

Camden-on-Gauley 

Clarksburg 

Terra Alta 

Washington, N. C. 

Morgantown 

Confluence, Pa. 

Havaco 

Morgantown 

Wheeling 

Madison 

Washington 

Morgantown 

Grafton 

Philippi 

Montrose 

Grafton 

Huntington 



., A.B. 
, A.B. 

A.B. 

A.B. 

., B.S.Ch.E. 
., B.S.C.E. 
., A.B. 
B.S.E.E. 



Sen., A.B. 
2d Yr. Med 

Soph., 

Soph., 

Soph., 

Fr., A 

Sen., 

Soph 



A.B. 
A.B. 
B.S.E.E. 
B. 

B.S.C.E. 
A.B. 



Fr., A.B. 
3d Yr Law 
Sen., B.S.H.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
1st Yr. Law 

3d Yr. Law 
Fr., B.S.M.E. 

1st Yr. Phar. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., B.S.E.M. 
Jun., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.M.E. 
Jun., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., B.S.H.E. 
Sen., B.S.E.E. 
3d Yr. Law 
Jun., B.S.Agr. 
Soph., B.S.E.E. 
Fr., B.S.E.E. 
Soph., B.S.Ch.E. 
Fr., A.B. 
*Fr., A.B. 
2d Yr. Med. 
Jun., B.S.Agr. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., B.S.Ch.E. 



416 



West Virginia University 



Murrin, Clarence Bernard 
Murrin, Julian Francis 
Musgrave, Raymond Frederick 
Mustard, Elizabeth Barnes 
Myers, Brayton Omar 
Myers, Carl Edward 
Myers, Frederick Arthur 
Myers, Lillian Catherine 
Myers, Mans ell Dumont 
Myers, Reed Folk 

A.B., West Virginia University, 

Myers, Sarah Catharine 

Nabors, Russell Milton 
Nale Ida Urania 
Nate, Leah May 
Nale, Naomi 
Nale, Ruth Leyman 
Nanna, Iillian Betoney 
Naples, Louis Anthony 
Nardacci, Nicholas 
Naylor, Clara Merle 
Naylor, Melvin Wiltshire 
Neel, Elizabeth Brownifield 
Neff, Gordon Clinton 
Nefflen, Bertha 
Neill, Joseph Underwood 
Neill, Virginia Louise 
Nelson, 'Roy Ezekiel 
Nestor, John Wesley 
Newell, Merl August 
Newman, Charles Albert 
Newman, Leonard Selby 
Newman, Percy Paul 
Nicastro, Thomas, Jr. 
Nichols, Carl Wayne 
Nichols, David Creel 
Nichols, Mildred Camille 
Nickison, Donald William 
Nicodemus, Charles Ried 
Niedermeyer, Agnes Katherine 
Niedermeyer, Helen Louise 
Nilan, George Cornelius 
Noble, Harold Lanslott 
Nolting, John Paul, Jr. 
Norman, Robert Gail 
Noyes, James Bradford 
Nugent, Edward Lawrence 
Nuhfer, William Leonard 



Oakes, Robert Gambrill 
Odland, Theodore Eugene 

M.S., University of Minnesota, 

O'Farrell, John Joseph 
O'Farrell, William Thomas 
Oldham, George Malcolm 
Oliker, Aaron Earl 
O'Loughlin, Joseph Eugene 



Parkersburg 


Fr., A.B. 


Parkersburg 


Fr., A.B. 


Point Pleasant 


Fr., A.B. 


Bluefield 


Fr., A.B. 


Wheeling 


1st Yr. Med. 


Montgomery 


Soph., A.B. 


Stoffel 


Fr., A.B. 


Cumberland, Md. 


Fr., A.B. 


M'cMechen 


Soph., A.B. 


Shepherdstown 


Grad., A. & S. 


1923. 




Core 


Sen., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Sen., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Jun., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Jun., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Soph., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Jun., A.B. 


Roderfield 


Fr., A.B. 


Jeannette, Pa. 


Soph., A.B. 


Youngstown, Ohio 


1st Yr. Med. 


Grafton 


*Fr., A.B. 


Elm Grove 


Jun., BjS.E.E. 


Morgantown 


Soph., A.B. 


Charleston 


Fr., B.S.E.E. 


Elkins 


Sen., A.B. 


Greensboro, Pa. 


Jun., B.S.E.E. 


Cairo 


Fr., A.B. 


Independence 


Grad. Ehg'g. 


Parsons 


Fr., B.S.Ch.E. 


Chester 


2d Yr. Med. 


Moundsville 


2d Yr. Law 


Morgantown 


Soph., B.'S.Agr. 


Clarksburg 


Fr., A.B. 


Montgomery 


*Fr., A.B. 


Clarksburg 


Fr., A.B. 


Clarksburg 


Fr., A.B. 


Elm Grove 


Fr., A.B. 


Wheeling 


Fr., A.B. 


Fairmont 


Fr., B.S.C.E. 


i Wheeling 


Soph., B.S.H.E. 


Wheeling 


Soph., A.B. 


Hurricane 


Fr., A.B. 


Grafton 


Jun., A.B. 


Clarksburg 


*Fr., B.S.E.E. 


Weston 


2d Yr. Phar. 


Wheeling 


Fr., A.B. 


Crown Hill 


Soph., B.S.E.E. 


Parkersburg 


Soph., B.S.E.E. 


Wellsburg 


Fr., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Grad., Agr. 



1920. 

White Sulphur Spg. Fr., B.iS.E.E. 
White Sulphur Spg. Fr., BjS.E.E. 
Elm Grove Soph., B.,S.M.E. 

Clarksburg Soph., A.B. 

New Martinsville last Yr. Phar. 



List of Students 



417 



Ormston, Brady William 
Osborn, Alexander Bland 
Osborne, Richard Arnold 
Osmond, John Baines 
Otey, Cosby Millard 
Ott, Marion Jane 
Ott, Maxwell Page 
Overbey, Joseph Lee 
Owens, John (Samuel 
Owens, Sidney James 

Paine, James Persons 
Painter, Marvin Leslie 
Paletz, Reuben Robert 
Palmer, Bessie Mae 
Palmer, Kenneth Robert 
Palmer, Neva Mae 
Park, Clermont Dixon 
Park, George 
Parker, Leston Eugene 
Parks, Carlton Langfitt 
Parks, Dorothy Catherina 
Parrack, Luther Deets 
Parriott, Fred Kimple 
Parsons, Daniel Randolph 
Parsons, Gerald Ernest 
Parsons, Landis Homer 
Patrick, Edwin Fox 
Patton, Jessie 
Paul, Ross Edwin 
Payne, William Burbridge 
Pearcy, Ethel 

Pearlman, Leonard Lawrence 
Pease, Horatio Thomas 

A.B., West Virginia University, 

Peirce, Grier Hartsell 
Pell, Robert 

Pell, Edward Norval, Jr. 
Perine, Howard 
Perrone, Joseph Addison 
Perry, Graves Hubbard 
Perry, James Leonard 
Perry, Wilbur Charles 
Peters, Frank Ellsworth 

B.S., Washington and Jefferson 

Peters, Herman Garrison 
Pettit, Ilah Frances 
Pfleger, Philip Arthur 
Phelps, Helen Mary 
Phillips, George Erastus 
Phillips, George Erskine 
Phillips, George Fred 
Phillips, Hayward Stewart 
Phillips, John McKinley 

B.S., Waynesburg College, 1923. 

Phillips, Nellie Elizabeth 
Phipps, Edithe Rothwell 
Pickens, John Daniel 



New Cumberland 


Soph., A.B. 


Clarksburg 


Fr., B.iS.C.E. 


Davis 


Jun., B.S.E.E. 


Berkeley Springs 


Jun., BjS.Ch.E 


Crumpler 


Fr., B.S.C.E. 


Lewisburg 


*Fr., B.S.H.E. 


Lewis'burg 


Jun., B.S.Agr. 


Huntington 


Soph., A.B. 


Montgomery 


Fr., A.B. 


Apollo, Pa. 


Fr., B.S.E.M. 


Charleston 


Fr., B.S.E.E. 


Arthur 


Soph., A.B. 


Camden, N. J. 


*Fr., A.B. 


Bridgeport 


Sen., A.B. 


Wheeling 


Sen., B.S.C.E. 


Pine Grove 


Soph., A.B. 


Parkersburg 


*Fr., A.B. 


Blacksville 


1st Yr. Med. 


Dalton, Mass. 


Fr., A.B. 


Fairmont 


Soph., B.S.E.E 


Elizabeth 


Jun., A.B. 


Terra Alta 


Fr., A.B. 


Moundsville 


Soph., A.B. 


Beverly 


Fr., B.S.Agr. 


Keyser 


Jun., B.S.C.E. 


Charleston 


Fr., A.B. 


Charleston 


Soph., A.B. 


Gap Mills 


Jun., A.B. 


Harrisburg, Pa. 


Fr., A.B. 


Welch 


Soph., A.B. 


Clarksburg 


Jun., A.B. 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 


Soph., A.B. 


Point Marion, Pa. 


Grad., A. & S. 


1922. 




Huntington 


Jun., B.S.E.M. 


Morgantown 


Fr., B.-S.E.E. 


Wheeling 


2d Yr. Med. 


West Union 


*Fr., B.S.Agr. 


Braddock, Pa. 


1st Yr. Med. 


Charleston 


*Fr., A.B. 


Talcott 


Soph., A.B. 


Huntington 


2d Yr. Law 


Moundsville 


1st Yr. Med. 


College, 1924. 




Union 


Soph., A.B. 


Hopemont 


Fr., A.B. 


Chicago, 111. 


2d Yr. Law 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Hinton 


Fr., B.S.E.E. 


Fayetteville 


Sen., A.B. 


St. George 


Fr., A.B. 


Hall 


Jun., A.B. 


Waynesburg, Pa. 


2d Yr. Law 


Morgantown 


Soph., A.B. 


Fayetteville 


Jun., A.B. 


Clarksburg 


Fr., A.B. 



418 



West Virginia University 



Pickens, Pearl 


Morgantown 


Sen., A.B. 


Pickering, Margaret Direxa 


Huntington 


Soph., B.S.H.E. 


Pierce, Garleton Custer, Jr. 


Kingwood 


Fr., A.B. 


Pierpoint, John Marshall 


Alma 


Fr., B.S.Agr. 


Pierpont, Paul Kenneth 


Fairmont 


Sen., B.S.M.E. 


Pierson, Ovy Ord 


Frametown 


*Fr., A.B. 


Pike, Charles Henry, Jr. 


Morgantown 


Soph., B.S.E.E. 


Pilson, Nell Brown Lee 


Charleston 


Fr., B.S.M.E. 


Pinkney, Harry Dixon 


Beckley 


Sen., B.;S.E.M. 


Pinsky, Abraham 


Bellaire, Ohio 


3d Yr. Law 


Piper, William Charles 


Wheeling 


Soph., A.B. 


Pitsenberger, Ada Morris 


Parkers'burg 


Jun., A.B. 


Pitsenberger, Charles Ezra 


Pool 


Sen., B.S.E.E. 


Pitsenberger, Isaac Irvin 


Pool 


Jun., B.S.Agr. 


Pletcher, Frank Moss 


Cameron 


Jun., B.S.M.E. 


Pletcher, Robert Oliver 


Cameron 


Soph., B,S.E.E. 


Politoske, Edward John 


Mannington 


Sen., B.S.M.E. 


Pope, Otis Alston 


Rpckville, Md. 


Soph., B.S.Agr. 


Porter, George Worth 


Littleton 


Soph., A.B. 


Porterfield, Donald Kennedy 


Bedington 


Fr., B.S.E.E. 


Porterfield, Harold Francis 


Bluefield 


Sen., A.B. 


Posten, Hale Judson 


Morgantown 


2d Yr. Law 


A.B., West Virginia University, 


1924. 




Powell, James Worley 


Morgantown 


Sen., A.B. 


Powell, Margaret Lila 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Powell, Mary Elizabeth 


New Cumberland 


Fr., A.B. 


Powell, Rupert Wendell 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Power, Francis Ray 


Martinsburg 


Sen., A.B. 


Power, Ray Clyde 


Follansibee 


Soph., A.B. 


Powers, Margaret Virginia 


Cameron 


Soph., A.B. 


Powers, Pauline Gwendolyn 


Cameron 


Fr., A.B. 


Pownall, Wilhelmina High 


Keyser 


Soph., A.B. 


Pracht, Henry Walters 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 


1st Yr. Med. 


Prather, Clarence Benton 


Morgantown 


Soph., B.S.E.E. 


Preese, Joseph Robert 


Monaca, Pa. 


Fr., A.B. 


Preiser, Philip 


Charleston 


Sen., A.B. 


Preis's, Alice Pauline 


Grafton 


Fr., A.B. 


Prettyman, Joseph Earnest 


Morgantown 


Sen., B.S.Agr. 


Price, Blanche Elizabeth 


Morgantown 


Grad., A. & S. 


A.B., West Virginia University, 


1917. 




Price, Chauncey Milton 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Price, Fred Burke 


Morgantown 


Sop'h., B.-S.Agr. 


Price, Paul Holland 


Morgantown 


Grad., A. & S. 


A.B., West Virginia University, 


1923. 




Price, Virginia Erwin 


New Cumberland 


Sen., A.B. 


Price, Vivian Swift 


Morgantown 


Night Class 


Priest, John Mason 


Morgantown 


Sen., A.B. 


Putnam, Alfred Rondol 


Fairmont 


Soph., A.B. 


Pyle, Elizabeth Stemple 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Pyle, Frederic Ray 


Morgantown 


1st Yr. Law 


Pyle, Hilda Mae 


Morgantown 


Soph., A.B. 


Pyle, Trella Pauline 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Pyles, Gyle Bliss 


Seebert 


Fr., BJS.E.E. 


Quarles, Charles Walthall 


Weston 


Sen., A.B. 


Quihlan, John James Nelson 


Huntington 


2d Yr. Law 


Quinones, Ramon Maldonado 


Caguas, P. R. 


1st Yr. Med. 



List of Students 



419 



Raemsch, Lawrence Edwin 
Ralsten, Mathew Murrill 
Ralston, James Gilbert 
Ramirez, Rafael Santos 
Ramsay, Harry Jones 
Ramsey',' Frank Burt 
Randolph, Byron Benedum 
Rangeley, Joseph Ware 
Ransom, Elaine King 
Ransone, Margaret 
Rapking, Aaron Henry 



Elkins 

Beckley 

Weston 

Caguas, P. R. 

Mount Pleasant, Pa 

Mt. Nebo 

Clarksburg 

Bluefield 

Park Ridge, 111 

Hampton, Va. 

Buckhannon 



B.D., Garrett Biblical Institute, 1914. 



Rardin, William Harrison 
Ratcliff, John Drury 
Ratcliffe, Roy Raymond 
Ratrie, John Stewart 
Rawlins, Helen Mortlock 
Ray, Charles Aubrey 
Ream, Mary Eleanor 
Reay, Virginia Dent 



Gallipolis, Ohio 

Huntington 

Clarksburg 

Sistersville 

Moss Point, Miss. 

Charleston 

Morgantown 

Mor°:antown 



Reddinsrton, Lawrence Edward Charleston 



Reed, "Charlotte Hellice 
Reed, Edith Lucile 
Reed, Hazel Eleanor 
Reed, John Joseph 
Reed, Margaret Evlyn 
Reed, Martha Frances 
Reed, Philirj Jefferys 
Reed, William Taylor 
Reed, William Wayne 
Reeder, Jacob Harvey 
Reese, Isabel Hall 
Rega, Romeo Bernard 
Reger, Scott Nicholas 
Rehm, Eugene 
Rehm, Robert Edmundson 
Reiner, Mary Olive 
Repair, Ruby Onnetta 
Reps, Russell Paul 
Reuter, Herman Louis 
Rexroad, Margaret Floe 
Reynolds, Cornelius Hilleary 
Heynolds, Eleanor Willard 
Reynolds Francis Marion, Jr. 
Reynolds, Hunter Love 
Reynolds. Lester 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1923. 

Reynolds, Thomas Ernest McMechen 

Rhodes, Phyllis Spencer 

Rice, Lacy Isaac Berkeley Springs 

Rice, Ralph Leslie Perkeley Springs 

Richards, Marion Esther Weston 

Richardson, Edwin Van Shinnston 

B.S.Agr., West Virginia University, 1915. 

Richardson, Hila Appleton Morgantown 

Richardson, Pleas Marlinton 

Richardson, Richard Ralph Charleston 

Richmond, David Hinton Huntington 



Williamstown 

Morgantown 

Mannington 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

MorgantowTi 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Monessen, Pa. 

Mt. Pleasant, Pa. 

Morgantown 

Richwood 

Wheeling 

Morgantown 

Parsons 

Parkersburg 

Hepzibah 

Morgantown 

Keyser 

Grafton 

Keyser 

Huntington 

Keyser 



Jun. 
Sen., 
Sen., 
Sen., 
Sen., 



Sen., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Sen., A.B. 
2d Yr. Med. 
.Jun., A.B. 
Sen., B.S.M.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
*Fr., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Grad., A. & S. 

1st Yr. Law 
Sen., B.S.E.M. 
Fr., A.B. 
Jun., B.S.C.E. 
Jun., A.B. 
Soph., B.S.E.M. 
Fr., A.B. 

A.B. 

B.S.C.E. 

B.S.H.E. 

B.S.H.E. 

A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.H.E. 
Fr., A.B. 
Sen., A.B. 
Jun., B.S.E.E. 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Jun., B.S.C.E. 
Jun., A.B. 
Soph., B.S.C.E. 
Fr., B.S.C.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
"Soph., B.S.Agr. 
Soph., B.S.H.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Sen., B.S.E.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
2d Yr. Law 

Jun., B.S.Agr. 
Jun., A.B. 
3d Yr. Law 
Sen., A.B. 
Sen., B.S.H.E. 
Grad., Agr. 

Soon., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.E.E. 
Soph., B.S.M.E. 



420 



West Virginia University 



Rickey, John Whittam 
Ridde'll, George William, Jr. 
Riddle, Paul Orville 
Ridenour, Harold Richmond 
Ridgeway. Emma May 
Ridgway, Louise Nellie 
Riggle, Hannah Gail 
Riheldaffer, William Howard 
Riley, Chester Loris 
Riley, Walter Joseph 
Rincon, Victor 
Rinehart, John Albert 
Rinehart, William Burrell 
Risher, Coe Byron 
Ritzinger, Augustus William 
Roach, John Virgil 
Roach, Pearle Lucinda 
Robb, Alexander Laing 
Robb, Francis Belmont 
Robb, Helen Madeline 
Robbins, Harry Esau 
Roberts, Anne Louise 
Roberts, Charles Em-mitt 
Roberts, Ethel 
Roberts, Glen Wallace 
Roberts, Hazel Van Dyke 

A.B., West Virginia University, 

Roberts, Ruth iSelina 
Roberts, Walter Moody 
Robertson, Harold Brooks 
Robertson, Walter Arthur 
Robey, Frances Elizabeth 
Robinson, Anthony Hall 
Robinson, Fleece Kinnaird 
Robinson, Paul Donald 
Robinson, Ruby Lillian 
Robinson, Wardner Clay 

A.B., Salem College. 

Robison, Charles Ernest 
Roby, Maude Brown 
Roca, Julio Caesar 
Rocawich, Mary Marguerite 
Rodes, Margaret Ware 
Roesch, Lydia 
Rogers, Alma Sophia 
Rogers, Cephas 
Rogers, Erlo Lester 
Rogers, Marion George 
Rogers, Mary Belle 
Rogers, Rhoda Ellen 
Rohrbaugh, Alvan Fortunatus 
Roles, Oscar 

Romesburg, Charles Koontz 
Romesburg, Robert Presley 
Rose, Arthur Reid 
Rose.. Katherine Hale 
Rosenberg, Morton George 



Moundsville 

Weston 

Cameron 

Princeton 

Ridgeway 

Morgantown 

Middlebourne 

Fairmont 

Romney 

Weston 

San Lorenzo, P. R. 

Everson 

Clarksburg 

Morgantown 

Buckhannon 

New Cumberland 

New Cumberland 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Richwood 

Elizabeth 

Morgantown 

Monessen, Pa. 

Elizabeth 

Elizabeth 

1924. 

Chester 

Elizabeth 

Clarksburg 

Clarksburg 

Fairmont 

Freemansburg 

Danville, Ky. 

Smithfield, Pa. 

Lumberport 

Blandville 

Huntington 

Mount Hope 

Yauco, P. R. 

Thomas 

Huntington 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Linn 

Buckhannon 

Jane Lew 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Camden 

Bluefield 

Charleston 

Charleston 

Morgantown 

Parkersburg 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 



3d Yr. Law 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., BJS.E.E. 
1st Yr. Phar. 
Jun., A.B. 
Soph., B.S.H.E, 
Sen., B.S.H.E. 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.E.E. 
1st Yr. Med. 
2d Yr. Med. 
Jun., B.S.C.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.C.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
Sen., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Sen., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Sen., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.C.E. 
Grad., A. & S. 

Soph., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Sen., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Sen., BjS.E.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.M.E. 
Fr., B.S.H.E. 
1st Yr. Law 

Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
2d Yr. Med. 
Soph., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Fr., BjS.C.E. 
Jun., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 



List of Students 



421 



Rosier, Robert Fairmont 

Ross, Charles Philip Charleston 

Ross, garrison Morton Goff Clarksburg 

Ross, Kelcel Milbur Buckhannon 

A.B., West Virginia Wesleyan College. 192«. 

Ross, Luke Burdette Cameron 

Ross, Robert Houston Cameron 

Roth, Clarence Edward Benwood 

Rothlisberger, Floyd Frederick New Martinsville 



Roush, Dallas Samuel 
Roush, Edward Herold 
Rowland, Dorothy 
Rowland, Edward Thomas 
Rubin, Abraham Creighton 
Rubin, Herman Edward 
Rule, Wertie Louise 
Runner, Delmar Gaston 
Runnion, Louise Florence 
Rupert, Elizabeth Rebecca 
Rupert, Harter Miller 
Russell, Arthur Lawrence 
Russell, Charlotte Mason 
Russell, Glen Alexander 
Russell, Madelyn 
Russell, Willard Dale 
Ryan, Clarence Daniel 

Saari, George John 
Sack, Irving Abner 
Saffel, Beulah 
Sample, Lloyd Erie 
Sampselle, Jack Sheppard 
Sanders, John Yernon 
Sandusky, Norris Hiram 
Sargeant, Harold Frederick 
Saum, Harold Jefferson 



Huntington 

Huntington 

Grafton 

Weirton 

Huntington 

Charleston 

Wyatt 

Morgantown 

Clarksburg 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Fairmont 

Fairmont 

Athens, Ohio 

Sistersville 

Athens, Ohio 

Mannington 

Weirton 

Elkins 

Elkins 

Fairmont 

Williamson 

Morgantown 

Parkersburg 

Fairmont 

Buckhannon 



A.B., West Virginia Wesleyan College, 1923. 



Savage, William Lee 
Savastone, John Nicholas 
Savich, Oscar 
Sayre, Everett 
Schachter, Eugene Joel 
Schafer, Benton Delmont 
Schambra, William Philip 
Scrtenk, Robert Edward 
Schlens, Fred 
Schlossberg, Louis 



Charleston 

Holliday's Cove 

Copen 

Ripley 

North Braddock, 

Morgantown 

Wheeling 

Wheeling 

Morgantown 

Huntington 



Schmeichel, Arthur Louis Paul Morgantown 



Schnopp, Jessie May 
Schnopp, Walter Clinton 
Scholl, Francis George 
Schoolnie, Jacob Wolfe 
Schrader, Harry Charles 
Schramm, John William 
Schroeder, Clarence F., Jr. 

A.B., West Virginia University, 

Schwartz, Ferdinand Francis 
Schwartz, Rose Gloria 



Hazelton 

Morgantown 

Wheeling 

Fairmont 

Morgantown 

Piedmont 

Grafton 

1923. 

Cleveland, Ohio 
Morgantown 



Sen., B.S.E.E. 
Jun., A.B. 
Special Law 
1st Yr. Law 

Fr., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Sen., B.S.Agr. 
Sen., B.S.E.E. 
Soph., B.S.M.E. 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
3d Yr. Law 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.H.E. 
Jun., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.H.E. 
Soph., B.S.M.E. 
3d Yr. Law 
Fr., A.B. 
1st Yr. Med. 
Fr., A.B. 
1st Yr. Med. 
*Fr., A.B. 

Jun., B.S.C.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
1st Yr. Phar. 
Soph., B.S.E.M. 
2d Yr. Law 

Fr., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.E.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
Pa. 2d Yr. Med. 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.Ch.E. 
Fr., A.B. 
Sen., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Soph., BJS.E.E. 
Special H. E. 
Sen., B.S.Agr. 
Special Eng'g. 
Soph.. A.B. 
Fr., B.S.M.E. 
Soph., B.S.E.E. 
1st Yr. Law 

Sen., A.B. 
2d Yr. Phar. 



422 



West Virginia University 



Scott, Albert B., Jr. 


Morgantown 


Jun., A.B. 


Scott, Alfred Beverly 


Morgaritown 


Sen., B.S.C.E. 


Seaibright, Virginia Henry 


Roney's Point 


Sen., A.B. 


Seaman, Anna The'lma 


Morgantown 


Sen., B.S.H.E. 


Selbe, Virginia 


St. Albans 


Fr., B.S.H.E. 


Seligman, iSidney Hyman 


Northfork 


Soph., A.B. 


Sellars, Frances Oavins 


Morgantown 


Fr., B.S.H.E. 


Sellers, Eugene Brownfield 


Morgantown 


Sen., A.B. 


Sellers, Virginia Hampton 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Sellers, William Lester 


Middlefbourne 


*Fr., A.B. 


Setron, Joseph Louis 


Morgantown 


Sen., B.S.E.M. 


Shaffer, Holly Miletis 


Clendenin 


Grad., A. & S. 


A.B., Marshall College, 1922. 






Sharer, Paul Nolble 


Independence 


Sen., B.S.Agr. 


Shaffer, Hubert Adams 


Parsons 


Soph., A.B. 


Shaffer, James Adam 


Morgantown 


Fr., B.S.M.E. 


Shaffer, James Harvey 


Morgantown 


Grad., Agr. 


B.S.Agr., West Virginia University, 1921. 




Shaffer, Margaret Augusta 


Morgantown 


Jun., A.B. 


Shaffer, Walter Elmer 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Shaid, Paul Henry Clay 


Elkins 


Soph., B.S.C.E. 


Shannon, Mayte Pearl 


Charleston 


Sen., A.B. 


Sharpies s, Constance Jane 


Martinsburg 


Sen., A.B. 


Shawver, John William 


Charleston 


Fr., A.B. 


Sheesley, George Maxwell 


Johnstown, Pa. 


Jun., A.B. 


Sheets, Paul Farris 


Bridgeport 


Jun., A.B. 


Shein, Maurice Bernard 


Huntington 


1st Yr. Phar. 


Shelton, Carl Fritz 


Logan 


Fr., A.B. 


Shelton, Joseph Egbert 


Moundsville 


Fr., A.B. 


Shinn, Leo Clovis 


Morgantown 


Jun., A.B. 


Shirey, Frederic Smith 


Blairsville, Pa. 


Fr., B.S.M.E. 


Shirey, Robert Elmer 


Bluefield 


Fr., A.B. 


ShoJbe, Paul Howard 


Petersburg, Va. 


B.,S.Eng'g. 


Shoher, Florence Evelyn 


Garrett, Pa. 


Jun., A.B. 


Shoup, Sarah Elizabeth 


Morgantown 


Sen., A.B. 


Showalter, Emmet M., Jr. 


Fairmont 


Fr., A.B. 


Shrewsbury, Ho'bart Graham 


Charleston 


Sen., B.S.C.E. 


Shriver, Elsie Ernestine 


Morgantown 


Soph., A.B. 


Shriver, John Prichard 


Burton 


Fr., A.B. 


Shriver, Leland Clarence 


Morgantown 


Sen., B.S.Ch.E. 


Shriver, Leroy Coburn 


Morgantown 


Soph., A.B. 


Shriver, Ross Chalfant 


Morgantown 


Soph., B.,S.Ch.E 


Shriver, Willard Evert 


Hedges ville 


Fr., A.B. 


Shugart, Gervis Gardner 


Harpers Ferry 


Jun., A.B. 


Shultz, John Percil 


Morgantown 


Jun., A.B. 


Shuttelworth, Jessie Edith 


Morgantown 


Fr., A.B. 


Sidell, Alonzo Russell 


New Martinsville 


Jun., A.B. 


Sidell, Rhea Mabel 


New Martinsville 


Sen., B.SJH.E. 


Sigmon, Walton Marion 


Westerly 


Soph., B.:S.Ch.E, 


Sigwart, Harry Joseph 


Morp-antown 


Soph., A.B. 


Simmons, Ora Leonard 


Franklin 


Fr., A.B. 


Simmons, William Leonard 


Spencer 


Fr., A.B. 


Simpson, Irene Stella 


Morgantown 


Soph., A.B. 


Simpson, Marjorie Jean 


Parsons 


Fr., B.S.H.E. 


Simpson, Stanley Hamilton 


Morgantown 


*Fr., A.B. 


Simpson, William Elbert 


West Union 


Jun., B.S.Agr. 


Sim's, Mary Madeline 


Fayetteville 


Fr., A.B. 



List of Students 



423 



Sine, Hiram Kent 
Sinsel, Rupert Alston 
Sizer, Kent Kane 
Skiles, Ada Frances 
Slaven, Garnet Cosby 
Sleboda, James Andrew 
Sleeth, Bailey 
Slifkin, Anne Sarah 
Smith, Clair 

Smith, Dorothy Elizabeth 
Smith, Edwin Garrison 
Smith, Elizabeth Maud 
Smith, Erlyn Leslie 
Smith, George Andrew 
Smith, Gertrude Elisabeth 
Smith, Hattie May 
Smith, Herman Huber 
Smith, Irvm Lawrence 
Smith, John Blackshere 
Smith, Katherine Louise 
Smith, Melvin Clyde 
Smith, Mona Mildred 
Smith, Millard Filmore 
Smith, Paul Hyatt 
Smith, Robert Davis 
Smith, Robert Van Meter 
Smith, Rose Gertrude 
Smith, Thomas Carson 
Smith, Virginia Lee 
Smith, Willis Edward 
Snider, Elsie Kilbreth 
Snodgrass, Kenneth Leroy 
Snodgrass, Kennis Ketterer 
Snodgrass, Pearl 
Snyder, Arthur Gail 



Blacksville 
Grafton 
Clarksburg 
Sabraton 
Oak Hill 
Stotesbury 
Linn 
Bluefield 
Morgantown 
Grafton 
Wadestown 
Albright 
Morgantown 
Wellsburg 
Morgantown 
Flemington 
Brown 

Middlebourne 
Clarksburg 
Fairmont 
■Wheeling 
Morgantown 
Elm Grove 
West Union 
Jersey City, N. , 
Petersburg 
Morgantown 
Blairsville, Pa. 
Morgantown 
Morgantown 
Keyser 

Holliday's Cove 
Mannington 
SmitMeld 
Sabraton 



B.S.Agr., West Virginia University, 1924. 



Snyder, Bess Virginia 

Snyder, Dorothy Caroline 

Snyder, Harriett Elizabeth 

Snyder, Henry Provance, Jr. 

Snyder, Harry Lambright, Jr. 



A.B., West Virginia University, 1923. 



Sabraton 
Ma son town 
Morgantown 
Uniontown, Pa. 
Shepherdstown 



Snyder, John Edgar 

Snyder, Robert Gibson 

Sobolak, Julius William 

Solenberger, Charles Frederick Martinsburg 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1923. 

Solof, Richard 
Solomon, Charles 
Sommerville, Howard Hoy 
Sorrent, John Baptist 
Sowers, Frank Freeman 
Sparks, Mattie Josephine 
Spaulding, Floyd 
Spaur, Klayde Beatrice 



Morgantown 
Weston 
Weir ton 



Charleston 
Windber, Pa. 
Sand Fork 
Holden 
Landgraff 
Lincoln, 111. 
Crum 
Grafton 



Jun 
Fr., 
Fr., 
*Fr 
s 



A.B., West Virginia University, 1923. 



Speicher. George Mitchell 



Terra Alta 



A.B., Davis and Elkins College, 1923. 



Sen., A.B. 
1st Yr. Law 
*Fr., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Jun., B.S.C.E. 
Fr., A.B. 

B.S.Agr. 

A.B. 

A.B. 
A.B. 
en., B.S.M.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
Jun., B.S.E.E. 
Jun., B.S.C.E. 
Fr., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Soph., B.S.E.E. 
Sen., A.B. 
Sen., A.B. 
Soph.. A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Sen., B.S.Agr. 
Soph., A.B. 
Special Law 
Soph., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Soph., B.S.E.M. 
Sen., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Sen., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
1st Yr. Law 
Sen.. A.B. 
Grad., Agr. 

Soph., B.S.H.E. 
Jun., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
3d Yr. Law 

Sen., B.S.C.E. 
2d Yr. Phar. 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.Ch.E. 

Fr., A.B. 
2d Yr. Med. 
Jun., A.B. 
1st Yr. Law 

2d Yr. Med. 
Sen., A.B. 
Voc. Agr. 
Grad., A. & S. 

Grad., A. & S. 



424 



West Virginia University 



Speicher, Katherine Lavinia 
Speiden, Henry Withers, Jr. 
Spencer, Fay Woodburn 
Spencer, James Devore 
Spencer, Paul Rufus 
Sperling, Mary Jane 
Spragg, John Carroll 
Springston, Jarrett Newton 
Spurgeon, Lulu Mabel 
Squires, Eva Grey 
Staats, Beverly Waugh 
Staats, Katharine 
Staats, Roydiee 
Stallman, Louis Horace 
Stalnaker, Earsle Doyle 
Stalnaker, Lillian 
Stanley, John Robert 
Stanley, Laiban Phelps 
Stanley, Robert Julian 
Stareher, Glenn Raymond 
Stark, Lewis Glenn 

B.S., University of Missouri, 1924 

Starkey, Archie Lemuel 
Stathers, Hugh .Sterling 
Stealey, Carline 
Steele, Charles Lee 
Steele, Janres Hammond 
Steele, John Lorentz 
Steele, William Donald 
SteemBergen, John Daniel 
Stegiall, Ralph (Shirley 
Stein, George ^Alvin 
Steimbicker, Paul Frederick 
Stemple, Ernestine Elizabeth 
Stemple, Fritz John 
Stemple, Godfrey Anderson 
Stemple, Isabel Catherine 
Stemple, Tyreeca Elizabeth 
Stemple, Vera Maude 
Stephens, Dorothy Evelyn 
Stephens, Mathilda Aldridge 
Stephenson, Virginia Mae 
S'terbutcel, Julia 
Sterbutcel, Rosalie 
Sterling, Robert Bruce 
Stevens, Edith 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1921 
A.M., West Virginia University, 19'2i3. 

Stevens, Edna Moro-antown 

Stevens, Guy Morgantown 

Stevenson, Charles Alexander Morgantown 

Stewart, James Kennedy Wheeling 

Stewart, Kermit Darling Morgantown 

Stewart, Merrie Marguerite Morgantown 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1921. 

Stewart, Thomas Nelson Morgantown 

Stickler, Charles Lester Sanger 

Stilwell, Mary Helen Moundsville 



Terra Alta 

Bluefield 

Morgantown 

Mannington 

Denver, Colo. 

Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

Huntington 

Huntineton 

Morgantown 

Flatwoods 

Charleston 

Charleston 

Ripley 

New York, N. Y. 

Philippi 

Parsons 

Fairmont 

Kleen Koal 

St. Marys 

Weston 

West Line, Mo. 

Wallace 

Buckhannon 

Fairmont 

McMechen 

Bluefield 

Morgantown 

Benwood 

Point Pleasant 

Amherstdale 

Wheeling 

Wheeling 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Aurora 

Amboy 

Morgantown 

Aurora 

Morgantown 

Martinshurg 

Clarksburg 

Wheeling 

Wheeling 

Uniontown, Pa. 

Morgantown 



Fr. 

Sen., 

Sen., 

Jun., 

Sen., 

Jun., 

Fr. 

Jun., 



A.B. 

, B.S.C.E. 

, A.B. 

, A.B. 
A.B. 
A.B. 
B.S.C.E. 
A.B. 
Night Class 
*Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
1st Yr. Med. 
Fr., A.B. 
Sen., A.B. 
Sen., A.B. 
Fr., BjS.E.M. 
1st Yr. Med. 
Sen., A.B. 
*Fr., BJS.Agr. 
Grad., Agr. 

2d Yr. Med. 
1st Yr. Phar. 
Sen., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
3d Yr. Law 
Soph., A.B. 
Sen., B..S.Agr. 
Fr., B.S.E.M. 
Sen., B.S.Ch.E. 
Sen., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.E.E. 

A.B. 

A.B. 
B.S.H.E. 

A.B. 
A.B. 
Soph., B.S.H.E. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Grad., A. & S. 



Sen., B.S.H.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Soph., B.S.E.E. 
Grad., A. & S. 

Sen., A.B. 
Sen., B.S.Agr. 
Fr., A.B. 



Jun. 
Sen. 
Fr., 
Jun. 
Fr., 



List of Students 



425 



Stine, Emmett 


New Martinsville 


Soph., A.B. 


Stinnette, Gaynes Pierre 


McAlpin 


Fr., A.B. 


Stockdale, Charles El'sworth 


Morgantown 


Grad., Agr. 


B.S.Agr., West Virginia University, 1916. 




Stoner, Louis Douglas 


Whipple 


2d Yr. Med. 


Stout, Alexander 


Clarksburg 


Sen., A.B. 


Stout, Charles Elden 


Parkersburg 


Fr., B.S.M.E. 


Stout, Thurman Allen 


Clarksburg 


Fr., B.S.C.E. 


Strader, Ralph Bishop 


Clarksburg 


Fr., B.S.C.E. 


Straight, Beryl Silas 


Lowesville 


Fr., B.S.Agr. 


Straight, Joseph J. 


Rivesville 


Sen., B.S.Agr. 


Strain, Glada Elizabeth 


Sisters ville 


Fr., A.B. 


Straton, Emma Geraldean 


Williamson 


Fr., B.S.H.E. 


Straw, Arthur Brooks 


Swandale 


Fr., A.B. 


Straw, Harry Gordon 


Swandale 


*Fr., A.B. 


Street, Lawrence Park 


Belington 


Jun., B.S.C.E. 


Strickler, Thomas Gilmore, Jr 


. Pennsboro 


Sen., A.B. 


Strickling, Lessie 


Wellsiburg 


Soph., B.S.H.E. 


Strieby, Ruth 


Elkins 


Sen., A.B. 


Strosnider, Gladyse Virginia 


West Union 


Fr., B.S.H.E. 


Strosnider, John Crum 


Williamson 


1st Yr. Phar. 


Strosnider, Mabel 


Clarksburg 


Jun., A.B. 


Strother, Beulah Sommerville 


West Milford 


Fr., B.S.H.E. 


Strother, James Alexander, Jr. Welch 


Fr., A.B. 


Strother, Walter Dennis 


West Milford 


Grad., A. & S. 


B.S.Phar., University of Michigan. 




Strouss.. Adella Elizabeth 


Morgantown 


Soph., B.S.H.E. 


Stuart, Susie Walkup 


Sinks Grove 


Sen., B.S.H.E. 


Stuck, William Bay, Jr. 


Grafton 


3d Yr., Phar. 


Stuckey, Forrest Noble 


Martinsburg 


Sen., A.B. 


Stull, William Prather 


Princeton 


Soph., A.B. 


Stultz, Miriam Augusta 


Huntington 


Fr., B.S.H.E. 


Stump, Eugene Curtis 


Charleston 


Soph., B.S.Ch.E, 


Stump, Mary Virginia 


Romney 


Sen., B.S.H.E. 


Sturgis, William Joseph 


Masontown 


Grad., Agr. 


B.S.Agr., West Virginia University, 1919. 




Sturgiss, Margaret 


Morgantown 


Sen., A.B. 


Sturm, Joseph Arthur 


Enterprise 


Sen., B.S.Agr. 


Suder, Anthony Francis 


Thomas 


1st Yr. Law 


Suffoletta, Daniel 


Midland, Pa. 


Soph., A.B. 


Sullivan, Homer William 


Charleston 


Fr., A.B. 


Summers, Fred Lindley, Jr. 


Parkersburg 


Soph., A.B. 


Summers, Gladys Georgia 


Lockwood 


Soph., A.B. 


Summers, Paul Otis 


Clendennin 


Soph., A.B. 


Summers, Roy Roosevelt 


Clendennin 


2d Yr. Med. 


Suter, Marie 


Glendale 


Soph., A.B. 


Sutphin, Glenn Truman 


Beckley 


Soph., A.B. 


Sutton, Neil 


William stown 


Fr., A.B. 


Swecker, Flora Jane 


Century 


Grad., A. & S. 


A.B., West Virginia University, 


1923. 




Sweeney, Anne Wilson 


Williamstown 


Sen., A.B. 


Sweeney, Virginia Redd 


Williamstown 


Sen., A.B. 


Swiger, Clyde Forrest 


Clarksburg 


Fr., A.B. 


Swindler, Allen Eugene 


Clarksburg 


Fr., A.B. 


Swisher, John Hugh 


Sutton 


Soph.. A.B. 


Sybert, Genevieve Virginia 


Moundsville 


Fr., B.S.H.E. 



426 



West Virginia University 



Tabor, Estel'le Baker 

A.B., Marshall College, 1923. 

Tagliavia, Anthony 
Talbott, Frances Adaline 
Talibott, Richard Howe, Jr. 
Talbott, Richard Kenneth 
Tallman, C'harles Cameron 
Tallman, Franklin Pierce 
Tarleton, Arban Calvin 
Tarr, John Clarence 
Tasker, Maud Elizabeth 
Taylor, Harry Nicholas 
Taylor, Harry Reeves 

A.B., West Virginia University, 

Taylor, Harry Rudkin 
Taylor, Henry Myers 
Taylor, Linn Arden 

B.S.Agr., West Virginia Undvers 

Taylor, Mabel Ruth 
Taylor, Malcolm Edgar 
Tchinski, Adam Louis 
Tebay, Howard" Amos 
Teel, George Elliott 
Tennant, Raymond John J. 
Tennant, Rex Burl 
Thayer, Charles Oliver 
Thayer, John M. 
Thayer, Richard Samsell 
Thel, Henry Charles 
Thobbs, Eula Elizabeth 
Thomas, Claire Lenila 
Thomas, Grant Jackson 
Thomas, Paul Gibson 
Thomas, Trevor Roosevelt 
Thompson, Albert John 
Thompson, Benjamin Frank 
Thompson, Carl Truman 
Thompson, Gilbert 
Thompson, Henry Howard 
Thompson, Lottie May 
Thompson, Nell 
Thompson, Velma Julia 
Thompson, William Gault 
Thornberry, Elizabeth Rachel 
Thornhill, Louise Massie 
Thurber, Ethel Milroy 
Tierney, James Aloysius, Jr. 
Tillis, Garnett Marie 
Timblin, Harold E. 
Timmons, Daisy Ella 

A.B., West Virginia University, 

Tinivell, John 
Tissue, William Abraham 
Titley, Luther Rowe 
Tobias, Zenada Roberta 
Tolley, Norman Rudolph 
Tomlinson, Eddie Myron 
Tomlinson, Iva Belle 



Morgantown 


Grad., A. & S. 


"Brooklyn, N. Y. 


1st Yr. Med. 


Clarksburg 


Fr., A.B. 


Elkins 


Soph., B.S.M.E. 


Philippi 


Soph., A.B. 


Beech Hill 


3d Yr. Law 


Beech Hill 


Jun., B.S.E.M. 


Fairmont 


Jun., B.S.M.E. 


Wells'burg 


Fr., A.B. 


Rice's Landing, Pa, 


, Soph., B.S.H.E. 


Parkersburg 


Jun., A.B. 


Keyser 


2d Yr. Law 


1924. 




Clendenin 


2d Yr. Law 


Beech Bootom 


Sen., B.S.Agr. 


Masontown 


Grad., A. & S. 


ity, 1922. 




Morgantown 


Soph., A.B. 


Clarksburg 


Soph., B.S.M.E 


Fairmont 


Soph., A.B. 


Parkersburg 


Sen., B.S.Agr. 


Oak Hill 


2d Yr. Phar. 


Morgantown 


Sen., B.S.E.E. 


Shinnston 


2d Yr. Phar. 


Morgantown 


*Fr., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Soph., B.S.E.E. 


Grafton 


Fr., B.S.E.E. 


Morgantown 


2d Yr. Med. 


Wilcoe 


Fr., A.B. 


Charleston 


Soph., A.B. 


Oak Hill 


Fr., A.B. 


Huntington 


Fr., B.S.E.E. 


M on ess en, Pa. 


Soph., A.B. 


Davis 


Fr., B.S.M.E. 


Davis 


Sen., B.S.Agr. 


Morgantown 


Sen., A.B. 


Beckley 


Fr., B.S.E.E. 


Thomas 


1st Yr. Phar. 


Morgantown 


Soph., A.B. 


Middlebourne 


Fr., A.B. 


Morgantown 


Sen., A.B. 


Mt. Hope 


Soph., A.B. 


West Mitford 


Soph., B.S.H.E. 


Bluefield 


Jun., A.B. 


Wheeling 


Fr., A.B. 


Weston 


Fr., A.B. 


Arbuckle 


Fr., B.S.H.E. 


Wheeling 


Fr., B,S.M.E. 


Triadelphia 


Grad., A. & S. 


1916. 




Morgantown 


Fr., B.S.Ch.E. 


Mt. Hope 


Jun., A.B. 


Denver, Col. 


Soph., A.B. 


Clearfield, Pa. 


Fr., A.B. 


Lost Creek 


Soph., A.B. 


Mt. Lookout 


Sen., A.B. 


Mt. Lookout 


Soph., A.B. 



List of Students 



427 



Tompkins, Thomas Blandford 
Toney, Thelma Fay 
Toothman, James Edwin 
Topper, Paul Freola 
Torin, David Irving 
Torry, Gail Mildred 
Townley, Harry Eugene 

LL.B., Cumberland University, 

Townley, Icye Lee 
Townsend, Thomas Hillis 
Trautwein, Henry Jacob 
Travis, £.lla Marjorie 
Treweek, John Spargo 
Trotter, James Francis 
Trotter, John Heermans 
Trotter, Lorentz Steele 

A.B., West Virginia University, 

Trump, Elizabeth Melvin 
Trump, John Sheldon 
Tucker, John Wyland 

A.B., West Virginia University, 

Tuckwiller, Patrick Alexander 
Turner. Robert Graham 

A.B., Lawrence College, 1920. 
M.S., Iowa State University, 1922 

Turner, Wallace Raymond 



St. Albans 

Mt. Hope 

Hundred 

Thomas 

Weirton 

Morgantown 

Charleston 

1924. 

Charleston 

Charleston 

Wheeling 

Point Marion, Pa. 

Wheeling 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

1920. 

Kearneysville 
Oak Hill 
Morgantown 

1923. 

Lewisburg 
Morgantown 



Parkersburg 



Fr., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 

1st Yr. Phar. 
Soph., A.B. 
1st Yr. Med. 
Sen., A.B. 
Special Law 

Soph., B.S.H.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.Ch.E. 
Soph., A.B. 

B.S.M.E. 

A.B. 

A.B. 

, A. & S. 



Sen. 
Sen., 
Jun, 
Grad 



Sen., A.B. 
Soph, A.B. 
Grad., A. & S. 

1st Yr. Med. 
Grad., A. & S. 

Soph., A.B. 



Umstead, Thistle Elizabeth 
Underwood, Thomas Miller 
Ungerleider, Harold Harrison 
Uribe, Jose 
Utterback, Harry 

Van Gilder, Elmer French 

B.S., West Virginia University, 

Van Horn, Karl Lane 
Van Horn, Verma Virginia 
Van Kirk, Robert William 
Van Meter, Wesley 
Vannoy, Ivan Francis 
Vannoy, Janet Pauline 
Van Voorhis, Ruth 
Van Zandt, Mildred 
Varner, Robert David 
Vaughn,, Edwin Owen 
Vaught, Stephen Kissling 
Veilines, Wesley Elmore 
Venable, Robert Vance 
Vermillion, Janice Evelyn 
Via, Robert Everett 
Vieweg, Emma Dorothea 
Villano, Julius 
Villers, Frederick L. 
Virden, Harry Paul 
Vogel, David Manuel 
Vogel, Ruth Martha Marie 

A.B., Maryland College. 

Volk, Bessie Mildred 
Vollenweider, John Albert 



New Martinsville 
Morgantown 
Wheeling 

Medellin, Colombia 
Morgantown 

Fairmont 

1912. 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Wake Forest 

Huntington 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Pt. Marion, Pa. 

McMechen 

Willow Bend 

Pt. Pleasant 

Hinton 

Charleston 

Welch 

White Sulphur Spgs 

Morgantown 

Piedmont 

Clarksburg 

Middlebourne 

New York, N. Y. 

Cumberland, Md. 

Cumberland, Md. 
Baltimore, Md. 



*Fr, A.B. 
Jun., B.S.M.E. 
1st Yr. Phar. 
Soph., B.'S.E.M. 
Fr., A.B. 

Grad., A. & S. 

Soph., A.B. 
Sen., A.B. 
2d Yr. Phar. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph, B.S.E.E. 
Jun, A.B. 
Jun, A.B. 
Sen, A.B. 
*Fr„ A.B. 
1st Yr. Med. 
Fr, A.B. 
Soph, B.S.E.E. 
Soph, B.S.E.M. 
Fr, A.B. 
Sen, B.S.As:r. 
Fr, B.S.H.E. 
Special, A. & S. 
Jun, B.S.Ch.E. 
2d Yr. Phar. 
Fr, A.B. 
Grad, A. & S. 

Soph, B.S.H.E. 
Grad, A. & S. 



428 



West Virginia University 



Waddell, Margaret Lynne Brandonville 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1908. 

Wade, Bryan Llewellyn Morgantown 

B.S.Agr., West Virginia University, 1923. 

Wade, Georgia Chorpening Morgantown 
Wade, James Lawrance 



Grad., A. &. S. 
Grad., Agr. 



Wade, Jesse Edward 
Wade, John Alexander 
Wade, Rebecca Estra 
Wadsworth, Arden 
Waggoner, Sylvia 
Wagner, Clyde Earl 

A.B., Defiance College, 1920. 

Wagner, Fred Henry 
Walden, George Washington 
Waldo, William Bernard 
Walker, Andrew 
Walker, Myrtle Estelle 
Walker, Raymond Clarence 
Wall, Lawrence Lester 
Wallace, Harry Alvin 
Wallace, Martha Travis 
Wallach, Robert 
Wallrabenstein, Roy A. 
Walls, Russell Roosevelt 
Walter, Austin Jacob 
Walters, Adam Everette 
Walters, Nelle 
Wamsley, Delia Mae 
Wamsley, Janet F. 
Ward, Freda Helen 
Ward, Ithra Kemper 
Warder, Francis Lucas 
Warder, Hugh Robert 
Ware, Paul Blackburn 



Parkersburg 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Adamston 

Harrisville 

Morgantown 

Wheeling 

Griffithsville 

Charleston 

Macdonald 

Wells'burg 

Williamson 

Charleston 

Charleston 

Morgantown 

New York, N. Y. 

Wheeling 

Morgantown 

Elm Grove 

Morgantown 

Mt. Hope 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Elkins 

Wallace 

Grafton 

Grafton 

Philippi 



A.B., West Virginia University, 1924. 

Warman, Simon Clemmer Weston 

Warman, Wilton Merle Morgantown 

Warniek, Patrick Jennings _ Williamson 

Washington, William Calvin Morgantown 

Wass, Dewey Schley Harrisville 

Waters, John Robert, Jr. Elkins 

Waters, Mildred Ann Elkins 

Watkins, Charles Abraham Morgantown 

Watkins, David Buekhannon 

Watson, Albert Thurman, Jr. Fairmont 

Watson, Catherine Gertrude Parkersburg 

Watson, Pauline Philippi 

Watson, Robert Lamb Fairmont 

Watson, Willis Burton Masontown 

Waugh, Bertha Grafton 



B.Ped., West Virginia Wesleyan, 1915. 



Waugh, Gladys 'Snyder 
Way, George Henry 
Weaver, Henry Francis 
Weaver, Mary McKinney 



Morgantown 
Wheeling 
Morgantown 
Morgantown 



Jun.. 

Fr., 

Jun.. 

Jun.. 

Sen.. 

Fr., 

Jun., 



A.B. 
A.B. 

A.B. 

A.B. 

A.B. 
B.S.C.E. 

B.S.H.E. 



A.B., West Virginia University, 1924. 



Webb, James Edwin 



Wellsburg 



Grad., A. & S. 

Fr., B.S.C.E. 
2d Yr. Med. 
Fr., A.B. 
*Fr., A.B. 
Soph., B.S.H.E. 
*Fr., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.E.M. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Sen., B.S.Agr. 
Sen., A.B. 
*Fr„ B.S.H.E. 
*Fr., B.S.H.E. 
Fr., B.S.H.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
3d Yr. Law 
Soph., A.B. 
2d Yr. Law 

Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Sen., A.B. 
*Fr., A.B. 
Sen., A.B. 
*Fr., A.B. 
Special Law 
2d Yr. Med. 
*Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Sen., A.B. 

Sen., A.B. 
Soph., B.S.Ch.E. 
Fr., A.B. 
Grad., A. & S. 

Soph., A.B. 



List of Students 



429 



Weber, Edward Fitzhugh 
Weber, Glen Chisholm 
Weber, John Carl 
Weckesser, Sylvia 
Weekley, Pauline Virginia 
Weekly, Lillian 
Weese, Samuel Josephus 
Weiler, Howard George 
Weisberg, Mark Manny 
Welch, Albert Thornton 
Welch, Ellithorpe Mae 
Welch, Julia Bates 
Welch, Sylvia 
Welch, William Arthur 
Welch, William Hamilton 
Wells, Dana 
Wells, Samuel Robert 
Welton, Wright Montgomery 
Weser, Don Francis 
West, John Thomas 

B.S., West Virginia University, 190 
A.M.. West Virginia University, 1923. 

Westfall, Oshel Perry Spencer 

Westover, Kyle Chester Morgantown 

B.S.Agr., New Hampshire College, 1917. 

Wetzel, Columbus Lon Clarksburg 

Wever, Elizabeth Snodgrass Martinsburg 
Wharton, Willa 
White, Frank Luther 
White James Horn 



Hinton 

St. Marys 

Weston 

Doylestown, Ohio 

Philippi 

Highland 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Bronx, N. Y. 

Winfield 

Morgantown 

Parkersburg 

Pennsboro 

Grafton 

Fairmont 

Morgantown 

New Martinsville 

Piedmont 

New England 

Morgantown 



New Martinsville 

Hundred 

Rich wood 



A.B., West Virginia University, 1924. 



White, Lisle Krozier 
White, Lorna Doone 
White, Lyle Frazier 
White, Mary Jane 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1918. 

White, Orville Dewey Mor°-antown 

B.S.Agr., West Virginia University, 1922. 

Whitlatch, Hayward Harris Pennsboro 

Whittaker, Berniee Marie 
Whitten, John Lamar, Jr. 
Whitten, Othniel Edward 
Wieda, Margaret Katherine 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1924. 

Wightman, Ernest Thomas Pittsburgh, Pa. 

BS., Pennsylvania State College, 1917. 

Wilber, Kenneth Roland 
Wilcox, Maurice Kenneth 
Wilderman, Ethel Phyllis 
Wildman, Irvin Compton 
Wiles, George Rogers C, Jr. 
Wiles, John Charles 
Wilfong, Harry Dean 
Wilhelm, Charles Philip 

M.S., University of Maryland, 1922. 

Wilhelm, Thelma Beatrice Cameron 

Wilkinson, Bernard Waldo Shinnston 

Willhide, Victor Cole Grafton 

Williams, Charles Early St. Marys 



Clarksburg 
Morgantown 
Williamson 
Morgantown 



Terra Alta 
Huntington 
Huntington 
Moundsville 



Gauley Mills 

West Union 

Piedmont 

Charleston 

Charleston 

Charleston 

Glenville 

Kingwood 



Fr., A.B. 
3d Yr., Phar. 
Fr., B.S.E.E. 
Fr., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Soph., B.S.H.E. 
Fr., B.S.Agr. 
2d Yr. Med. 
1st Yr. Phar. 
Voc. Agr. 
Sen., B.S.H.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.H.E. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., B.S.E.E. 
Fr., A.B. 
1st Yr. Med. 
Sen., A.B. 
Soph., B.S.C.E. 
Grad., A. & S. 



Soph., 
Grad., 



B.S.Agr. 

Agr. 



3d Yr. Law 
Fr., A.B. 
*Fr., B.S.H.E. 
Sen., B.S.Ch.E. 
2d Yr. Law 

Soph., B.S.H.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
1st Yr. Law 
Grad., A. & S. 

Grad., Agr. 

Fr., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
2d Yr. Law 
2d Yr. Law 
Grad., A. & S. 

Grad., Agr. 

Soph., A.B. 
Sen., A.B. 
*Fr., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Sen., A.B. 
1st Yr. Law 

Jun., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Sen., B.S.E.M. 



430 



West Virginia University 



Williams, Cornelia May 
Williams, Doris Elizabeth 
Williams, George Edward 
Williams, George Thomas 
Williams, Helen Martha 
Williams, Joseph, Jr. 
Williams, Leonard Gray 
William's, Robert Emmett 
Williams, Thomas Griffith 
Williams, vfilliam Andrew 
Williams, William Forrest 
Williamson, Charles Alfred 
Williamson, Donald Byer 
Williamson, Franklin Eudell 
Williamson, Odas Delphia 
Willis, Haymond Charles 
Willman, Homer Dale 
Wilson, Edward Stanley 
Wilson, Eva Margaret 
Wilson, Frank ■Ausbin 

A.B., Ohio Wesleyan University, 

Wilson, Georgia 
Wilson, Henry Lawrence 
Wilson, Hugh Cunningham 
Wilson, Johnathan Hollis 
Wilson, Kathleen Virginia 
Wilson, Louis Heazelton 
Wilson, Lucy Myrl 
Wilson, Marshall Barr 
Wilson, Philip Clarence 
Wilson, Virginia 
Wimer, Ralph Patterson 
Winter, Gladys Norma 
Winters, Mary Beulah 
Wirt, Richard MoCosh 
Wise, Carl Richard 
Wise, HerBert Bennett 
Wise", Thomas Reuben 
Wiseman, Marrs 
Withers, Lelia 
Witt, Edward Tempest 
Wolfe, Ethel Gwendolyn 
Wolfe, Karl Morgan 
Wolfe, Lucy Malinda 
Wolfe, Rose Jeane 

A.B., West Virginia University, 

Wolfe, Slidell Brown 
Wolfe, Walter Hardman 
Wolpert, Milton 
Wood, Charles Adolphus, Jr. 
Wood, John Edmund 

A.B., Denison University, 1924. 

Wood, Mack Espy 
Wood, Ruth Augusta 
Wood, iStrauss Roger 

A.B., Bethany College, 1919. 

Woodburn, Dorothy Mary 
Wooddell, Edith Marguerite 



Morgantown 

St. Marys 

Macdonald 

Moorefield 

Morgantown 

St. Marys 

Morgantown 

Middlebourne 

Welch 

Morgantown 

Bellepoint 

Connellsville, Pa. 

Wilkinsiburg, Pa. 

Kenova 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Clendenin 

Marlinton 

Belington 

Walkersville 

1923. 

Bluefield 

Taplin 

Wheeling 

Blaine 

Morgantown 

Clarksburg 

Pennsiboro 

Toll Gate 

Spencer 

Harrisville 

Hendricks 

St. Albans 

Elm Grove 

Morgantown 

Charleston 

Charleston 

Fairmont 

Fayetteville 

Grafton 

Northfork 

Pt. Pleasant 

Kingwood 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

1924. 

Kingwood 

Morgantown 

Charleston 

Charleston 

Huntington 

Charleston 

Morgantown 

Reader 

Parkers'burg 
Webster Springs 



Sen., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Special Eng'g. 
Pr., B.S.Agr. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
2d Yr. Law 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., B.S.E.E. 
Voc. Agr. 
Fr., B.S.C.E. 
Fr., B.S.C.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
Sen., B.S.H.E. 
1st Yr. Law 
Fr., B.S.C.E. 
Fr., A.B. 
Sen., A.B. 
Grad., A. & S. 

*Fr., B.S.H.E. 
Jun., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.E.E. 
Sen., A.B. 
Sen., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Jr., B.S.H.E. 
Soph., B.S.Ch.E. 
Sen., A.B. 
Sen., B.S.H.E. 
Jun., A.B. 
Jun., B.S.H.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
Soph., B.S.C.E. 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., BjS.E.E. 
Soph., B.S.C.E. 
Jun., A.B. 
Sen., B.S.E.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
Sen., B.S.E.E. 
Sen., A.B. 
Grad., A. & S. 

Fr., BjS.E.E. 
Fr., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.C.E. 
1st Yr. Law 



Soph., A.B. 
Sen., A.B. 
Grad., A. & 

Jun., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 



S. 



List of Students 



431 



Wooddell, William Hart Webster Springs 

Woodford, Alberta Louise Huntington 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1913. 

Woodford, Clarence Howe Clarksburg 

Woodford, Edward Blanchard Philippi 

Woodford, Helen Virginia Philippi 

Woodroe, Elizabeth Newcomb Charleston 

Woodroe, William May Charleston 

Woodrum, Harold Browning Ronceverte 

Woods, Phala Beaver 

Woodville, Ernestine Grey Lansing 

Woodville, Eugenia Davis Lansing 

Woofter, Carey DeKalb 

A.B., West Virginia University, 1924 

Worden, Leo Francis 
Workman, Ira Vincent 
Workman, Lucy Dee 
Wotring, Robert William 
Wotring, Ruth Lana 
Wright, Elden Edward 
Wright, Ethel Fae 
Wright, Florence Anna 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1916, 

Wright, Harry Alford 
Wright, Meryl Donald 
Wright, Russell Eshmul 
Wunschel, William Frederick 
Wyckoff, Everett Bailey 
Wylie, Ward 
Wysong, William Prentiss 



Soph. 
Grad. 



A.B. 

A. & 



S. 



Yates, George Sinsel 
Yeager, Genevieve Grace 
Yeager,, William Russell 
Yorke, Evelyn Hughes 
Yost, Katherine 
Young, Clarence Morris 
Young, Joseph Lamar 
Young, Louis Yoh-ing 

E.M., Colorado School of Mines, 

Young, Ulysses Grant, Jr. 



Davis 

Morgantown 

Ceredo 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Cameron 

Cameron 

Matoaka 

Morgantown 

Monongah 

Wheeling 

Grafton 

Glace 

Webster Sfprings 

Pennsboro 
Marlinton 
Parkersburg 
Morgantown 
Fairmont 
Clendenin 
Mounds ville 
Swatow, China 

1923. 

Buckhannon 



A.B., West Virginia Wesleyan College, 1923. 



Zapata, Miguel 
Zearley, Joy 

A.B., West Virginia University, 

Zeh, Helen Louise 
Zeller, Charles Adam 
Zevely, John Grant 
Ziler, Philip Ward 
Zimmer, George William, Jr. 
Zimmerman, Frances Olivia 
Zinn, Ralph Howard 
Zippay, David John 
Zirkle, Burman B. 



Mayaguez, P. R. 
Morgantown 

1920. 

Wheeling 

Morgantown 

Morgantown 

Elkins 

Wheeling 

Blueneld 

Morgantown 

Charleroi, Pa. 

Brown 



Jun., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
1st Yr. Law 
Fr., B.S.C.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Grad., A. & S. 

Sen., B.S.E.E. 
Soph., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Jun., B.S.E.M. 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., B.S.Ch.E. 
Sen., A.B. 
Grad., A. & S. 

Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Sen., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
1st Yr. Med. 
Soph., A.B. 

Soph., A.B. 
Soph., B.S.H.E. 
Fr., A.B. 
1st Yr. Law 
Fr., A.B. 
Fr., A.B. 
Sen., A.B. 
Grad., Ehg'g. 

2d Yr. Law 



Fr., A.B. 
Grad., A. & S. 

Fr., A.B. 
2d Yr. Med. 
Fr., A.B. 
Jun., A.B. 
Jun., B..S.C.E. 
Jun., A.B. 
2d Yr. Med. 
Fr., A.B. 
Soph., A.B. 



Students Enrolled in the Schools 



Adams, John Newmyer 
Amburg, Mary Esther 
Amos, Autumn 
Arnett, Mildred Elma 
Arrington, Mamie Patterson 

Baker, Charlotte Blair 
Baker, William B. 
Barlow, Earl William 
Barnes, Sarah Grace 
Barnett, Georgia Susan 
Barnhart, Celeste Ada 
Barnhart, Enod Flora 
Barr, Dorothy Carney 
Bartlett, Icie 
Bates, James Burlin 
Bayles, Carline McDonnell 
Beavers, Margaret Eloise 
Bennett, Gladys Marian 
Berry, Virginia Lee 
B'evington, Geraldine Margaret 
Bevington, Lorenzo Keller 
Billings, Jane Lull 
Birmingham, Mary Angela 
Bishop, Iva 
Blaine, Laura Mildred 
Blair, Bonita 
Blake, Charles Leo 
Bloom, Mildred Faustatine 
Bonner, Jo'hn William 
Bow-ditch, Richard Lyon 
Bowers, Marguerite 
Bowliby, Williard 
Boyd, Olga LeMoyne 
Biracey, Eliza Cathrine 
Brand, Dorothy Virginia 
Brown, Alice Josephine 
Brown, Carrie Alberta 
Brown, George Paris 
Brown, Mamie lone 
Brown, Mary Frances 
Brown, Wianda Esther 
Buckley, Ralph Barnett 
Bunch, Margaret 

Cain, Harry E. 
Campbell, Anna Elizabeth 
Carter, Ida Virginia 
Gather, Maude Minshall 
Cavendish, Grace Jones 
Chamlbers, Mabel Sarah 
Chancey, Mary Ellen 



Bethany 


Summer School 


Buckhannon 


Summer School 


Burnsville 


Music 


Morgantown 


Music 


Helen 


Summer 'School 


Morgantown 


Music 


Behngton 


Summer School 


Cleveland, Ohio 


Summer School 


Weston 


Summer School 


Parkersburg 


Summer School 


Woodruff 


Summer School 


Aleppo, Pa. 


Summer School 


Morgantown 


Music 


Philippi 


Summer School 


Center Point 


Summer School 


Morgantown 


Music 


Welch 


Summer School 


Morgantown 


Summer School 


Morgantown 


Summer School 


ret Morgantown 


Music 


Morgantown 


Music 


Tunkhannock, Pa. 


Music 


Cumberland, Md. 


Summer School 


Blaine 


Summer School 


Dormont, Pa. 


Music 


Morgantown 


Music 


Mounds ville 


Summer School 


Morgantown 


Summer School 


Wallace 


Summer School 


Milton, Mass. 


Summer School 


Carrollton, Mo. 


Summer School 


Morgan 4 )wn 


Music 


Morgantown 


Music 


Morgantown 


Music 


Morgantown 


Music 


Morgantown 


Music 


Wheeling 


Summer School 


Pineville 


Summer School 


Buckhannon 


Summer School 


Morgantown 


Music 


Heights 


Music 


Buckeye 


Summer School 


Huntington 


Summer School 


Fairmont 


Summer School 


Summers ville 


Summer School 


Elm Grove 


Music 


Morgantown 


Music 


Montgomery 


Summer School 


Bethany 


Summer School 


Poca 


Summer School 



List of Students 



433 



Chapman, Ruby Amice 
Chesrown, Harold 
Chidester, Floyd Earle 
Chittum, Mary Dille 
Clark, Bruce 
Clark, Helen Watson 
Clark, Humboldt Yokum 
Clawson, Nevada Arietta 
Clay, Earl Lewis 
Coffindaffer, Cora Ruth 
Coglan, Eleanor Virginia 
Cohen, Pauline Pearl 
Cole, Blanche 
Collett, Irene Marie 
Collins, Willa 
Conn, Jacob Kemp 
Conway, Joseph Rufus 
Cooper, Isabel 
Cooper, Margaret Louise 
Costolo, Conn 
Crawford, Emily Catherine 
Crouch, Mary Elizabeth 
Crow, John Randall 
Crowl, Helen Josephine 
Cullinan, Mary Agnes 
Cummings, Ferieda 
Cutlip, Joseph Regis 
Cypher, /Helen Anna 

D'Amico, Laura 

Daniels,, Minnie Lohr 

Darrall, Mary Leanna 

Daughenbaugh, Fay Katheryn 

Davies, Phillip J. 

Davis, James Foxworthy 

Davis, Lucretia 

Davis, Mary Alice 

Davis, Roberta Emma 

Davison, Nancy Mae 

Deitz, Delta 

Delli Gatti, Frank 

Delynn, Gladys 

Dennison, Katherine Frances 

Dent, Sara Jane 

Denton, Myrtle 

Dilgarde, Dorothy 

Dille, Lucile Beltzhoover 

Dornbush, Frank Donald 

Dougan, Josephine 

Dowling, Carl Leroy 

Duling, Hugo Bruce 

Dusenberry, Donald Joseph 

Duvall, Mary Adalyne 

Elder, Grayce Ernestine 
Elder, Mary Gladys 
Ellison, John Roland, Jr. 



Huntington 


Summer 


School 


McKees Rocks, Pa. 


Summer 


School 


Wireton, Pa. 


Music 




Morgantown 


Summer 


School 


Uniontown, Pa. 


Music 




Morgantown 


Music 




Hemlock 


Summer 


School 


Parkersburg 


Summer 


School 


Rougemont, N. C. 


Summer 


School 


Jane Lew 


Summer 


School 


Westernport, Md. 


Summer 


School 


Morgantown 


Music 




Morgantown 


Summer 


School 


Morgantowm 


Music 




Fairmont 


Music 




Point Morion, Pa. 


Summer School 


Morgantown 


Summer School 


Hinton 


Summer 


School 


Wellsburg 


Music 




Gans, Pa. 


Summer 


School 


Philippi 


Music 




Elkins 


Summer 


School 


Glen Easton 


Summer 


School 


Fairmont 


Music 




Dean 


Summer 


School 


Kingwood 


Music 




Morgantown 


Music 




Ypsilanti, Mich. 


Summer School 


Morgantown 


Music 




Parsons 


Summer 


School 


Mt. Pleasant, Pa. 


Summer 


School 


Thomas 


Summer 


School 


Morgantown 


Music 




Princeton 


Summer 


School 


Outcrop, Pa. 


Summer 


School 


Morgantown 


Music 




Homestead, Pa. 


Summer 


School 


Morgantown 


Music 




Richwood 


Summer 


School 


Fairmont 


Summer 


School 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 


Summer 


School 


Clarksburg 


Summer 


School 


Morgantown 


Music 




Corydon, Ky. 


Summer 


School 


Uniontown, Pa. 


Music 




Morgantown 


Music 




Bethany 


Summer School 


Morgantown 


Music 




Wellsville, Ohio 


Summer 


School 


Morgantown 


Summer 


School 


Morgantown 


Music 




Claysville, Pa. 


Summer 


School 


Morgantown 


Music 




Morgantown 


Music 




Suffolk, Va. 


Summer 


School 



434 



West Virginia University 



Emerson, Dorothy Esther 
Emerson, John Francis 
Everly, Helen Core 

Federer, Allie Gertrude 
Feclerer, Ralph West 
Ferguson, Milton Carr 
Fette, Bertha May 
Fiorentino, Elmer 
Fisher, Edna Mae 
Fleming, Elisabeth Robinson 
Fleming, Olive Marie 
Fling, Elsie Frances 
Fling, Fay 
Fordyce, Hazel 
Fordyce, Sanford Tennant 
Fowler, Mary Margaret 
Francis, Carl C. 
Frank, Anna Leona 
Freeland, Lora 
Inirbee, Ruth E'stelle 

Gamage, Harry George 
Garda, Peter 

Garfield, Blanche Allendena 
Gibbons, Teresa 
Gibson, Ercell Elizabeth 
Gibson, Inez 
Gibson, Loisibelle Baker 
Gilbert, Mary Brown 
Glover, Peter Luther 
Goddard, Hazel Mary 
Goodall, Chloe Lee 
Goodall, Gladys Goldie 
Goodrich, Cecile Pearl 
Gore, Alvin Belton 
Graffuis, Irene Johnson 
Greer, Joseph Marion, Jr. 
Gregg, Kenneth Carroll 
Gregg, Margaret Virginia 
Grimes, George 
Grose, Hester 
Grose, Lois Margaret 
Grove, Mayme Leatherman 
Groves, Huling 
Grulbbs, Alice Louise 

Hahn, Rose Minnie 
Hadden, Sara Mildred 
Hall, Fonda Valera 
Hammel, Helen Eliza 
Harold, Reatha Grace 
Haught, Edwin Pascal 
Hecker, Norma Marian 
Helphrey, Daniel Anderson 
Henderson, Virginia 
ITenry Elroy 
Hess, Eloise 



Morgantown 


Music 


Morgantown 


Music 


Morgantown 


Summer School 


Morgantown 


Music 


Morgantown 


Music 


Huntington 


Summer School 


Wheeling 


Summer School 


Elkins 


Music 


Sutton 


Music 


West Newton, Pa. 


Summer School 


Grantsville 


Music 


Morgantown 


Music 


Morgantown 


Music 


Fairview 


Summer School 


Fairview 


Summer School 


Sabraton 


Summer School 


Bethany 


Summer School 


Morgantown 


Music 


Morgantown 


Music 


Clarksburg 


Summer School 


Fairmont 


Summer School 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 


Music 


Morgantown 


Summer School 


New Martinsville 


Summer School 


Morgantown 


Music 


Hurricane 


Summer School 


MorR-antown 


Music 


Morgantown 


Music 


Morgantown 


Summer School 


Morgantown 


Music 


Charleston 


Summer School 


Charleston 


Summer School 


Mt. Morris, Pa. 


Music , 


Madison 


Summer School 


Fairmont 


Music 


Hillsboro 


Summer School 


Morgantown 


Music 


Morgantown 


Music 


Fairmont 


Slummer School 


Valley Fork 


Stammer School 


Wheeling 


Summer School 


Romney 


Summer School 


Deepwell 


Summer School 


Dendron, Va. 


Summer School 


Arcadia, Fla. 


Music 


Princeton 


Summer School 


Morgantown 


Music 


Mannimgton 


Music 


Morgantown 


Summer School 


Mannington 


Summer School 


Fairmont 


Music 


Utica, Ohio 


Summer School 


Richwood 


Music 


Morgantown 


Summer School 


Co wen 


Music 



List of Students 



435 



Higgins, Thomas Jefferson 
Hill, Elizabeth Florence 
Hill, Franklin Herman 
Hilleary, Ethel 
Hoard, Kathleen Sara 
Hoff, Mary Gertrude 
iloward, Lynn Ray 
Howard, Sylvia Ross 
Hughes, Cathryne Frances 
Hughes, Mildred Geraldine 
Hupp, Ethel 

Hutchins, John Catherine 
Hutchinson, Blanche Cook 

Jacobs, Grace Baldwin 
Jeffries, Garnet 
Jenkins, Nellie Byron 
Jobes, Nellie 
Johnson? Howard 
Johnston, Mary Pelley 
Johnston, Ruth Helene 
Johnston, Walton Bottimore 
Jones, Hayden Howel 
Jones, Hildred Blanco 

Kable, Louise Melville 
Kelley, Rose Ann 
Kelton, Lucy Stedman 
Kemper, Margaret Graham 
Kennedy, Henry Robert Roger 
Kenney, Charles Edwin 
Kindeliberger, Caroline Isabel 
King, Marjorie Adair 
Knott, Dewey Schley 
Kramer, Emma Gertrude 
Krepps, James Henry 

Lakenan, May 
Laporte, Daniel James 
Lash, Viola Belle 
Lawrence, Faith 
Law-son, Minerva Douglas 
Lazzell, Flora Adelia 
Lee, Laura Frances 
Levine, Harry Alfred 
Lewis, Martha Jane 
Limpert, Walter Earl 
Litsinger, George Alfred 
Lockard. William Abram 
Lough, Sara Ellen 
Lowry, Esther Isabel 
Lowther, Harriett Ruby 
Lowther, Katharine Persis 
Lowther, Nadine 
Loy, Bernard Cecil 
Loy, Melvin Parsons 
Lusebrink, Hazel Charlotte 



Washington, D. C. 


Summer School 


Morgantown 


Summer 


School 


Middlebourne 


Summer 


School 


Deer Park, Md. 


Summer 


School 


Morgantown 


Music 




Smithfield 


Music 




Clarksburg 


Summer 


School 


Clarksburg 


Summer 


School 


Morgantown 


Music 




Morgantown 


Music 




Cameron 


Summer 


School 


Morgantown 


Music 




Morgantown 


Summer 


School 


Morgantown 


Summer 


School 


Uniontown, Pa. 


Music 




Morgantown 


Music 




Pullman 


Summer 


School 


Sandyville 


Summer 


School 


Morgantown 


Music 




Morgantown 


Summer 


School 


Bluefield 


Summer 


School 


Morgantown 


Music 




Eden, Md. 


Summer 


School 


Charles Town 


Summer 


School 


Salem 


Summer 


School 


Columbus, Ohio 


Summer 


School 


Lynnwood, Va. 


Summer 


School 


Point Marion, Pa. 


Music 




Clifty 


Summer 


School 


Wheeling 


Music 




Morgantown 


Music 




Elkins 


Summer 


School 


So. jjirown?ville, Pa. Summer 


School 


Morgantown 


Summer 


School 


Morgantown 


Summer 


School 


Adelaide, Pa. 


Summer 


School 


Buckhannon 


Summer 


School 


Morgantown 


Music 




Elkins 


Music 




Morgantown 


Music 




Morgantown 


Music 




Morgantown 


Music 




Morgantown 


Music 




Clarksburg 


Summer 


School 


Hinton 


Summer 


School 


Point Marion, Pa. 


Summer 


School 


Buckhannon 


Summer 


School 


Huntington 


Summer 


School 


Mannington 


Music 




Morgantown 


Music 




Clarksburg 


Summer 


School 


Chelyan 


Summer 


School 


S. Charleston 


Summer 


School 


Morgantown 


Music 





436 



West Virginia University 



Madden, Margaret 
Manger, John Arthur 
Mannfcig, Anna Mae 
Manown, J: Ross 
Marsh, Maude Ethel 
Martin, Charles Beasley 
Maxwell, May Wilson 
McClun£, Hazel Dunbar 
MeComas, Eupha Lee 
McCoy, Margaret Elizabeth 
MoDaniel, Floyd 
McDonald, Rexford Glenn 
McKee, Alice J. 
McKinney, Robert Myers 
McVey, Howard Rodgers 
Meredith, Kate 
Milam, Otis Huffman 
Miller, Harriet Jane 
Mitchell, Henry Clay 
Moore, Lucille Holden 
Morris, Edna Leyman 
Moyers, Kennie Allen 
Mullen, Malcolm Preston 
Murphy, Irene Gertrude 
Myers, Ruth Allan 

Nicholson, Harry 

O'Dea, Bernadette 
O'Farrell, Mary Catherine 
Olsey, Theodore James 
Orr, Mary Martilla 
Oxley, Sweetland 

Pagenhardt, Amy Marie 
Parker, Joseph Wiley 
Parker, Ruth Fairfax 
Patterson, James Howard 
Patterson, Laurence George 
Penn, Raymond Arthur 
Philipson, Lillian Glueck 
Poland, Alice Hazel 
Powell, Nettie 
Powell, Thomas E. 
Price, Ocea May 
Pritchard, Ernest Markwood 
Prunty, Esther Jane 
Prunty Mildred Morine 

Pyles, Martha Emaiine Delila 
Randolph, Maye E. 
Rash, Emily Armorette 
Reed, Clara Ernestine 
Reed, Elizabeth Estelle 
Richards, Laura Bradley 
Richard's, Margaret Dickey 
Roach, Jessie Mabel 
Roark, George Wheeler 



Morgantown 


Music 


Baltimore, Md. 


Summer School 


Cameron 


Summer School 


Morgantown 


Music 


Bristol 


Summer School 


Concord, Va. 


Summer School 


Elkins 


Music 


Sinks Grove 


Summer School 


Matoaka 


Summer School 


Parkersiburg 


Music 


Oceana 


Summer School 


Peterstown 


Summer School 


Morgantown 


Music 


Woodbine, Md. 


Summer School 


Lewi'sburg 


Summer School 


Morgantown 


Summer School 


Barraekville 


Summer School 


Morgantown 


Music 


Wheeling 


Summer School 


Wallace 


Music 


Morgantown 


Music 


Franklin 


Summer [School 


Bunn, N. C. 


Summer (School 


Morgantown 


Summer iSchool 


Morgantown 


Music 


Adam'ston 


Summer School 


Littleton 


Summer School 


Marlinton 


Summer School 


Bethany 


Summer School 


Morgantown 


Summer School 


Huntington 


Summer School 


Westernport, Md. 


Summer School 


Kelford, N. C. 


Summer School 


Morgantown 


Music 


Morgantown 


Summer School 


Hopedale, Ohio 


Summer School 


Powell, Ohio 


Summer School 


Morgantown 


Summer School 


Piedmont 


Summer School 


Parkersiburg 


Summer School 


Parkers/burg 


Summer School 


Morgantown 


Music 


West Union 


Summer School 


Morgantown 


Music 


Morgantown 


Music 


Matoaka 


Summer School 


Williamson 


Summer iSchool 


Gallagher 


Summer School 


Morgantown 


Music 


Morgantown 


Music 


Fairmont 


Music 


Fairmont 


Music 


Wolf Summ it 


Summer School 


Altavista, Va. 


Summer School 



List of Students 



437 



Roberts, Edith Elizabeth 
Roberts, Jacob Earle 
Robinson, Clara Lenore 
Robinson, Harry Grayden 
Robinson, Merriem 
Rogers, Elsie Virginia 
Rogers, Genevieve 
Rogers, Minnie Virginia 
Rogers, Nettie Lorayne 
Rotunno, Lucille Adeline 
Rowley, Laura Vee 

Sacco, Carmine 
Sanders, Sara Frances 
Scranage, Mary Rector 
Sedwick, Earle Jacob 
Shallenberger, Laura Braun 
Shober, Veda Elizabeth 
Shoup, Jane Summerson 
Shriver, Pearle Coburn 
Shriver, Ruth Beulah 
Shriver, Verella May 
Shuttleworth, Mildred Rose 
Shuttleworth, Helen Miriam 
Sigwart, Alice Sophia 
Simpson, Mildred 
Slater, Sara 
Slawter, Harry 
Smith, Margaret Elizabeth 
Smith, Margaret Maude 
Smith, Marguerite Elizabeth 
Smith, Mildred Alma 
Snyder, Suzan Evaleen 
Spargo, Caroline 
Staley, Mary Pansy 
Steele, Martha Pauline 
Sterling, Mabel Virginia 
Stewart, Garnet Ruth 
Stewart, William Jennings 
Stiles, Dennis 
Stout, Pauline 
Strader, Leslie Hermson 
Straight, Herschel Bryan 
Strobel, George Elwood 
Summerson, Thelma Elizabeth 
Sumpstine, Wilbur 
Swartz, Lakey Eloise 

Taylor, Claude Baker 

Taylor, Dorothy 

Taylor, Ok Nina 

Thomas, Ethel Mae 

Thompson, Mary Ruth 

Tibbs, Ruth 

Titterington. Arvilla HotchkissLogan 

Toothman, Homer Clinton 

Toothman, Ocie Mabel 



Morgantown 


Music 




Point Marion, Pa. 


Summer 


School 


Morgantown 


Summer 


School 


Philippi 


Summer 


School 


West Newton, Pa. 


Music 




Monessen, Pa. 


Music 




Morgantown 


Music 




Morgantown 


Music 




Brown 


Summer 


School 


Morgantown 


Music 




Shinnston 


Summer 


School 


Morgantown 


Music 




Morgantown 


Music 




Grafton 


Summer 


School 


Blacksville 


Summer 


School 


Latrobe, Pa. 


Summer 


School 


Garrett, Pa. 


Summer 


School 


Morgantown 


Summer 


School 


Morgantown 


Music 




Morgantown 


Music 




Morgantown 


Summer School 


Fairmont 


Summer 


School 


Nutter Fort 


Summer 


School 


Morgantown 


Music 




Morgantown 


Music 




Moreantown 


Music 




Bridgeport 


Summer 


School 


Morgantown 


Music 




Fairmont 


Summer 


School 


Morgantown 


Saimmer 


School 


Monessen, Pa. 


Music 




Bayard 


Summer 


School 


Wheeling 


Summer 


School 


Kenova 


Summer 


School 


Stouts Mills 


Summer 


School 


Dilliner, Pa. 


Music 




Morgantown 


Music 




Salem 


Summer 


School 


Morgantown 


Music 




Bridgeport 


Summer 


School 


Morgantown 


Sr^nmer 


School 


Rivesville 


Summer 


School 


Cameron 


Summer 


School 


Portsmouth, Va. 


Music 




Somerset, Pa. 


Summer 


School 


Hendricks 


Summer 


School 


Wayne 


Summer 


School 


Morgantown 


Music 




Hurricane 


Summer 


School 


Bruceton Mills 


Summer 


School 


Morgantown 


Summer 


School 


Morgantown 


Music 




sLogan 


Summer School 


Fairmont 


Summer 


School 


Fairmont 


Music 





438 



West Virginia University 



Trotter, Georgia Ellen 
Tyre, Lela Mae 

Ulrich, Harriet Edna 

Van Deren, Sarah Margaret 

Warren, Josephine Bean 
Waters, Lela 
Watkins, Anne Elise 
Watson, Dorothy Elizabeth 
Watson, Lucille 
Weaver, Charles Walter 
Welling, Edna Rachael 
White, Lucille Page 
White, Stanley Ray 
Whitman, Mary Atkins 
Wiles, Myrle 
Wilkes, Edythe Sylvia 
Williams, Edith Eugenia 
Williams, Harriett 
Williams, Mary Margaret 
Willison, Clara Elizabeth 
Wilson, Frank Ausbin 
Wilson, Harry Inskip 
Wilson, James William 
Wilson, Varina Maree 
Winter, Rupert Edward 
Wolfe, Marshall Richard 
Wood, Nellie Ash 
Woofter, Mary Bush 

Yost, Orin Ross 

Zeh, Pansy Wilcox 
Zimmerman, Flora Felton 



Marysville, Wash. 


Music 


Elkins 


Summer School 


Wheeling 


Music 


Danville 


Summer School 


Clay 


Summer School 


Morgantown 


Summer School 


Buckhannon 


Summer School 


Morgantown 


Summer School 


Albright 


Summer School 


Emory, Va. 


Summer School 


McMechen 


Summer School 


Clarksiburg 


Summer School 


Morgantown 


Summer School 


Beckley 


Summer School 


Morgantown 


Music 


Morgantown 


Music 


Morgantown 


Music 


Morgantown 


Music 


Morgantown 


Music 


Oakland, Md. 


Summer 'School 


Walkers ville 


Summer 'School 


Blaine 


Summer School 


Weston 


Summer School 


Hinton 


Summer School 
Summer School 


Shinnston 


Morgantown 


Summer School 


Reader 


Stammer School 


Salem 


Music 


Kim'ball 


Summer School 


Morgantown 


Music 


Morgantown 


Sumner School 



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INDEX 



Absences, 36, 315. 

Accredited preparatory schools, 32, 56. 
Address list of faculty and staff, 375. 
Administration, Officers of, 5. 
Admission to the University, 32, 50. 
Admlission, Requirements for 

Cdlilege of Agriculture, 241. 

College of Arts & Sciences, 103. 

College of Engineering, 186. 

College of Law, 277. 

Course in Pharmacy, 316. 

Course in Public Health, 175. 

Degree course in Home Economics, 265. 

School of Medicine, 300. 

School of Music, 327. 

Summer School, 3,50. 
Advanced standing, 35, 187, 242, 280. 
Agricultural Education, 92, 108, 250 . 
Agriculture : 

College of, 229. 

Experiment station, 18, 232, 236. 

Extension division, 20, 234. 

Entrance credit in, 241. 

Courses in 249. 

Summer courses in 242. 
Agronomy, 92, 108, 252. 
Aid for students, 46. 
Alpha Delta Pi Sorority Prizes, 47. 
Alpha Zeta, 42. 
Alumni secretary, 42. 

American Association of University Pro- 
fessors, 42. 
American history, 145. 

American Institute of Electrical Engi- 
neers, 184. 
American Institute of Mining and Metal- 
lurgical Engineers, 184. 
American Society of Civil Engineers, 184. 
American Society of Mechanical Engi- 
neers, 184. 
Anatomy, 96, 297, 304. 
Animal Husbandry, 93, 108, 253. 
Armory, 358. 
Assistant professors, 10. 
Assistants, 15. 
Associate professors, 9. 
Arts and Sciences, College of, 97. 
Athletic board of control, 22. 
Athletics, 29. 

Bachelor's degrees, 39, 104, 188, 242, 277, 

301, 318, 330. 
Bacteriology, 110, 298, 305, 312, 324. 
Band Music, 359. 
Bar examinations, 282. 
Boarding and rooming places, 46, 351. 
Botany, 65, 109, 324. 
Brown Prize, The James F., 48, 285. 
Bryan Prize, 47, 285. 
Buildings, 27, 180, 239, 276, 296. 
Business administration, 96, 120. 

Cadet band, 359. 

Cadet corps, 355. 

Cafeteria, 351. 

Calendar, 4. 

Campus, map of, 24. 

Certificates in music, 327. 

Certificates for teachers, 49, 245. 

Chemical engineering, 89, 111, 200, 223. 

Chemistry, 66, 111, 323. 

Chi Omega Sorority Prize, 47. 



Chorus singing, 326. 

Christian associations, 41. 

Civil engineering, 190. 

Class officer, 62, 243, 266. 

Coal mining, 192, 215. 

Combined courses in two colleges, 105, 204, 

247, 280, 301. 
Committees : 

of University faculty, 22. 

of Agricultural faculty, 235. 

of Engineering faculty, 179. 
Composition and rhetoric, 129. 
Concerts and recitals, 326. 
Conditional admission, 34, 301. 
Conditions, 37. 
Control, Board of, 3. 
Convocation, 41. 
Council of Administration, 5. 
Courses of Instruction : 

College of Arts and Sciences, 108. 

College of Agriculture, 249. 

College of Engineering, 208. 

College of Law, 290. 

In home economics, 268. 

Open to graduates, 65. 

School of Music, 322. 

School of Medicine, 304, 321. 

Courts, Student Club, 284. 
Credits, 32, 35, 242. 
Curricula : 

In agriculture, 243. 

In engineering, 188-205. 

In home economics, 266. 

In medicine, 302. 

In music, 331. 

In pharmacy, 317. 

In public health, 176. 

Dairy husbandry, 93, 255. 
Dean of Women, 45. 
Dean of Men, 45. 
Degrees : 

General regulations concerning, 39. 

Graduate, 61. 

In the College of Arts and Sciences, 104. 

In the College of Agriculture, 242. 

In the College of Engineering, 188. 

In the College of Law, 281. 

In Home Economics, 265. 

In the School of Music, 330. 

Conifer-red in 1924, 361. 
Demonstration fruit grading and packing 

plant, 240. 
Diplomas in music, 327. 
Discipline, 41. 
Dispensary, 297, 313. 
Drawing, 208. 

Economics and sociology, 69, 117. 

Education, Board of, 3. 

Education, 71, 124. 

Elective courses, 106, 245, 205, 247, 248, 

319. 
Electrical engineering, 88, 127, 194, 212. 
Embryology, 297. 
Engineering and Mechanic Arts : 

College of, 177. 

Experiment station, 227. 

Graduate work in, 64, 207. 

Supplementary summer term in, 206. 
Engineering Society, 184, 222. 
English, 50, 73, 127. 



Index 



English language and literature. 130. 

English history, 144. 

Enrollment, summary of, 439. 

Ensemble, 336. 

Entomology, 93, 135, 256. 

Entrance credit, 32. 

Entrance requirements. See admission. 

Equipment: 

In the College of Agriculture, 239. 

In the College of Engineering, 180. 

In home economics, 264. 

In the School of Music, 325. 

In the School of Medicin.% 296, 311. 
European history, 142. 
Examinations, 37, 287. 
Experiment station, Agricultural, 18, 232, 

236. 
Experimental engineering, 218, 228. 
Expenses, 31, 45, 185, 286. 
Extension courses : 

In agriculture, 272. 

In College of Arts and Sciences, 107. 

In industrial education, 227. 

In mining, 227. 

Faculty : 

Alphabetical list of, 375. 

College of Agriculture, 229. 

College of Arts and Sciences, 97. 

College of Engineering, 177. 

College of Law, 275. 

Department of Pharmacy, 309. 

Division of Military Science, 355. 

School of Medicine, 295. 

School of Music, 325. 

Summer School, 343. 

University, 6. 
Failure in course, 37. 
Farm economics, 94, 136, 257. 
Farm Mechanics, 258. 
Farm, Reymann Memorial, 238. 
Farm, University, 239. 
Fees, See Tuition. 
Foods, 269. 

Foundation of University, 24. 
French, 53, 85, 168. 

Fruit grading and packing plant, 240. 
Funds, 27. 

Gas engineering, 87, 218. 

General information, 41. 

Genetics, 94, 258. 

Geology and mineralogy, 75, 136, 198. 

German, 53, 76, 139. 

Governing Boards, 3. 

Government of University, 26. 

Grading, system of, 37, 287. 

Graduate courses and degrees, 40, 61, 207. 

Greek, 52, 140. 

Health service, Student, 30, 297. 
High school certificates, 49. 
High schools, List of, 56. 
Histology, 297. 

History of the University, 25. 
History, 53, 76, 142. 
Home economics, 149, 264. 
Honor societies, 42. 
Horticulture, 94, 149, 259. 
Hydraulic engineering, 88, 220. 

Industrial education, 202, 226. 

Instruction, Staff of, 6. 

Instructors, 12. 

Inter-fraternity scholastic trophies, 48. 



Journalism, 106, 134, 251. 
Journalism, Agricultural, 108. 

Laboratories, 28, 180, 239, 297, 311. 

Latin, 52, 79, 150. 

Law, College of, 275. 

Law, Coursss in, 290. 

Law, Library, 277. 

Law Quarterly, West Virginia, 284. 

Library, 27, 299, 313. 

Library methods, 152. 

Library staff, 21. 

Location of University, 25. 

Machine design and construction, 152, 208. 

Major subjects, 104. 

Mathematics, 54, 80, 153. 

Matriculation, 35. 

Maximum and minimum work, 35. 

Mechanical drawing and machine design, 

208. 
Mechanical engineering, 192. 
Mechanics, 157, 214. 

Medical library and reading room, 299. 
Medical service, 30, 297, 313. 
Medical building, 296. 
Medicine, Course in, 302. 
Medicine, School of, 295. 
Metallurgy, 89, 111, 200, 223. 
Mid-semester reports, 37. 
Military Science and Tactics, Division of, 

355. 
Military Science: 

Courses of instruction in, 359. 

Required training in, 29, 356. 

Special rewards for excellence in, 358. 

State law regarding, 356. 
Mineralogy, 136. 

Mining engineering, 157, 196, 198, 215, 227. 
Mining, Summer course in, 227. 
Mowrey Memorial Prize, 48, 285. 
Music : 

Tuition in, 330. 

Courses in, 157. 

In Summer school, 342, 353. 

Instructors in, 317. 

School of, 325. 

Requirements for graduation in, 327. 

Theory of, 340. 

History of, 341. 

Officers of the University, 5. 
Oil and gas engineering, 198. 
Organizations and societies, 43. 

Pathology, 298, 305. 
Pharmaceutical Association, 314. 
Pharmacist's register, 314. 
Pharmacy: 

Curriculum in, 317. 

Courses in, 321. 

Department of, 309. 

Laboratories of, 311. 

Requirements for practice of, 310. 
Pharmacognosy, 311. 
Pharmacology, 298, 306, 312. 
Phi Beta Kaiia Society, 42. 
Philosophy, 82, 158. 

Physical education for women, 29, 160. 
Physical diagnosis, 308. 
Physics, 83, 161. 

Physiological chemistry, 298, 307, 313. 
Physiology, 298, 306, 312, 324. 
Plant pathology, 95, 165, 261. 



Index 



Piano, 328, 333. 

Pipe organ, 328, 337. 

Political science, 79, 148. 

Pomology, 259. 

Poultry husbandry, 95, 165. 266. 

Practical observation, Facilities for, 183. 

Practice and procedure in law, Courses in, 

288. 
Pre-legal course in College of Arts and 

Sciences, 279. 
Pre-medical course in College of Arts and 

Sciences, 302. 
Preparatory schools, 56. 
Prizes, 47, 284. 
Professional degrees in engineering, 64, 

207. 
Professors, 6, 42. 
Psychology, 82, 158. 
Public health, Course in, 175. 
Public school music, 329, 337. 
Public speaking, 166. 
Publications, Student, 44. 
Publications, University, 43. 



Sociology, 70, 121. 

Soils, 96, 172. 263. 

Spanish, 85. 170. 

Special students, 34, 187, 279. 

Staff of instruction, 6. 

Standing committees, 22. 

Steam and gas engineering, 87, 218. 

Structural engineering, 88, 220. 

Student aid, 46. 

Student assistants, 16. 

Student government association, Women's, 

44. 
Student publications, 44. 
Students, List of, 387. 

Substitution for required courses, 35, 189. 
Summer Courses : 

In engineering, 206, 222. 

In agriculture. 242. 

In mining, 227. 
Summer School, 343. 
Surgery, Introductory, 308. 
Surveying, 217. 
Suspension, 37. 



Railway and highway engineering, 217. 

Recommendation of teachers, 48. 

Reports of grades, 37. 

Reserve Officers Training Corps, 29, 354. 

Residence requirements, 40. 

Reymann Memorial Farm, 238. 

Rhetoric, 129. 

Road engineering, 217. 

Romance languages and literature, 85, 168. 

Rooms and boarding places, 46, 351. 

Sanitary engineering, 220. 
Schedule of Courses : 

B.Mus. Course, 320. 

B.S.Agr. Course, 241. 

B.S.C.E. Course, 191. 

B.S.M.E. Course, 193. 

B.S.E.E. Course, 195. 

B.S.E.M. Course, 197, 199. 

B.S.Chem.E. Course, 201. 

B.S.H.E. Course, 255. 

B.S.Pharm. Course, 318. 

Industrial education, 203. 

Medicine, 302. 

Ph.C. Course, 317. 
Summer School, 343. 
School in Mining, Summer, 227. 
School of Music, 325. 
Science Entrance credits in, 55. 
Sigma Xi Club, 42. 
Social life of students, 44. 
Societies, 46. 



Tau Beta Pi, 42, 184. 
Tax Commission Prize, 47, 285. 
Teacher's Bureau, 49. 
Teacher's Certificates, 49, 245. 
Textiles and clothing, 269. 
Theses, 64. 189. 

Tuition, Rates of, 31, 185, 286, 
342, 350. 



299, 314, 



University : 

Location and history of, 25. 
Government and organization of, 26. 

Vegetable gardening, 260. 
Veterinary science, 263. 
Violin. 328, 335. 
Vocational Education, 227. 
Voice, 328, 332. 

Withdrawal from University, 36. 

West Virginia Law Quarterly, 284. 

Women, Dean of, 45. 

Women's Hall, 45. 

Women's student government association, 

44. 
Work done in absence, Credit for, 38, 187, 

207. 

Y. M. C. A., 41. 
Y. W. C. A., 41. 

Zoology, 86, 172. 






21 

1925-1926